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The room in which my 6month old sleeps is becoming a bit cold during the cold days. There isnt any heating in his room. We have a permanent solution for this, but that route is not a fast one, so that isnt really an option right now.

I'd like to make his room a bit warmer. I dont need summer temps, a good warm sleeping bag/sack1 goes a long way, but he's getting too cold and I like to solve that. I cant come up with a (cheap-ish, remember: there will be a proper solution) solution for this.

  • I currently have a basic electric heater (600w) running, but its a bit loud and I really dont trust those things. It also requires the whole room to come to temp. The small one I have now does have a sortof decent thermostat, so it does turn itself off.
  • I checked IR panels, but those aren't recommended for people who cant communicate that its too warm. My little guy falls in that group, so no go.
  • There are heated pads you can place under the sheets2, but as not all the milk stays inside the infant, I dont like the idea of placing one of those in his bed.
  • I thought about some heated mat and place it under his crib, radiating from below, but I'm not a fan of those either. If something goes wrong, I have zero time to do something about that.
  • A heated jug would work, but for the first 2, maybe 3 hours.
  • An extra warm blanket: We have those, but he likes to kick his feet, so that doesnt work for the night.

So, how would you solve this? I'm having difficulty deciding wether I'm too paranoid. I just really dont like leaving heating elements like the unattended with a baby and I'm hoping that there is another solution I didnt think of.

PS: The 'Similar questions' suggest heating for a diaper change. While that might be a nice bonus, its not the main focus, its to get him warm thoughout the night.


Edit: I've bought a thermometer, its 17°C (62.6F). According to multiple sources, about 18C is no problem and since he has no issues with temperature, I'm guessing there is no problem here.
The reason we thought it was too cold is because the floor is quite cold, colder than the room. We adults walk on it and conclude its cold, but he in his crib is air only.

Edit2: The night started at 18°C (64.4F), but the morning was 15°C(59F).


1 Is that the right name? Random example
2 Ditto, Random example

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    for example (1), I've seen it as "sleep sack", with "sleeping bag" being more like this
    – Esther
    Oct 20, 2023 at 16:20

3 Answers 3

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How cold is the room? I'm asking because many parents think that infants need a warmer room than they actually need (in other words most infants tend to overheat rather than feel cold). Babies can sleep in a 14°C/57°F room with a long sleeved cotton body suit and a sleepsuit, inside a 3.5 TOG sleeveless sleeping bag. If you shop around for a sleeping bag, you'll see that many have a TOG guide on the packaging with recommended TOGs and clothing for different room temperature ranges.

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  • I did not actually measure it, but I dont think it was far off of 14C (exceptional cold wind, from a cold winddirection which doesnt occur often). I'll go check the suit if there is more info. He was definitally cold though, cold arms/legs/nose/ear.
    – Martijn
    Oct 22, 2023 at 8:39
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    @Martijn Cold hands are not necessarily a reason to worry, they can occur even if the child is perfectly comfortable. You get a better estimate when you touch the back of the neck or the rump.
    – Stephie
    Oct 22, 2023 at 9:12
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    @Martijn - One of my grandchildren was in the NICU for a while, so their parents were quite worried about taking her home. Their Neonatologist told them, "Cold hands, warm feet" was the goal. So, cool hands with the child in a sleep sac was not a problem at all. Legs shouldn't be cold. Oct 22, 2023 at 22:47
  • We have m boy in a cold bedroom, at that age he was in a 3.5tog baby sleep sack(with arms out), long onesie and a vest. We also had a thermometer in there so we could tell the temperature.
    – R Davies
    Oct 23, 2023 at 7:54
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In Scandinavia we use thin wool sleeping suits, and wool socks, and a cap if necessary.

This enables the infant to sleep comfortably in a colder room.

After that, a sleeping sack can help.

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A night light temperature thermometer like Tommy teepee or grobaby is a useful thing to have. My husband is always hot and I am always cold, I do not trust myself. I do trust temperature thermometers :)

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