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Most of the western websites suggest to keep the room temperature at around 20 or 22.

But where I live, the max temperature during the summer is often around 40 degree Celcius, and even at night it is above 28.

Majority of the population here cannot afford an air-conditioner and manage with a fan, but the babies manage to do okay.

So are these temperature recommendations more suitable for babies in western nations or is it universal? I am just wondering if I should somehow shift to a different house and invest in an air-conditioner. (My current house has an old traditional roofing of the area which has way too many gaps - probably for ventilations)

I really appreciate your help.

THank you.


Maybe this isn't has to do with many other factors, however, In Indian Union where I live, nations like Kerala and Tamil Nadu which experience higher average temperature has better infant mortality rate compared to states with significantly cooler average temperature such as Uttarakhand and Uttar Pradesh.

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    As you have noted, babies are born there and don't die, so clearly they are guidelines, not absolutes. Babies have similar needs no matter where they're born. If you are concerned enough to consider relocating, you should be asking your baby's doctor about this. On the internet, you're asking for a complete stranger's opinion, and a newborn is in some ways a fragile human being.
    – anongoodnurse
    Apr 17 at 14:42

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https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/climate-change-heat-and-health

"Aim to keep your living space cool. Check the room temperature between 08:00 and 10:00, at 13:00 and at night after 22:00. Ideally, the room temperature should be kept below 32 °C during the day and 24 °C during the night. This is especially important for infants or people who are over 60 years of age or have chronic health conditions."

The above article gives ideal room temperatures for day and night, which you can use to evaluate your current home to see how your room temperatures compare.


https://www.popularmechanics.com/home/interior-projects/a21272176/energy-saving-house-cool/

3 Energy-Saving Ways To Keep Your House Cooler This Summer Using two principles and a little ingenuity, you can cool your house for not much more than the cost of a couple of box fans.

The above article has a couple good pictures of how air movement through a home can help keep the house cool. It's possible that the air circulation you have in your current home is helping keep your home cool.

The article also shows how to build a simple air conditioner with parts that are generally easy to find and intended to be inexpensive.


https://www.scarymommy.com/scandinavian-babies-nap-outside-cold-weather

Why Scandinavian Babies Nap Outside In Cold Weather

I've included this article to show that what is considered reasonable for children and temperatures varies quite a bit, so, while the first article has temperatures for day and night, it could be that those values are the "ideal" temperatures.

For example, any nighttime temperature that's 32C or below, even if it doesn't get down to 24C, may be very reasonable for your location. Maybe your daytime temperature is 34C, and that 2C difference isn't a problem for your child.


Personally, at 20C, unless I'm moving around quite a bit, I get cold, and 22C is only slightly more comfortable. In my experience it's only men who like room temperature to be at 20C.

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