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My son completed 22 months and not talking with us. My wife stays at home to take care of him. Right now he says some 15-20 alphabets, 4 colors. We usually show him TV during lunch and dinner (60 minutes/day). He does not pay attention to our words. When I try to talk to him, he speaks gibberish or color he likes. He does not say, mommy or daddy. He does not point things when he wants something, we walks there and cries if he can not get it. Sometimes he does not turn back when we call his name. We are trying so hard to make him listen to our words (20 common words), but it's not helping. At 18 months our pediatrician suggested SLP, but we thought we could teach him. At this point, I feel like we failed in our job. I called SLP last week and got an appointment for the assessment. Usually, my wife feeds, cleans and changes his diaper. His physical development has been good. This has been more stress on me than my work for past couple of months. I would really appreciate any suggestions to improve his speaking skills.

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    This is a little broad. We do understand your concern and frustration, though. "At 18 months our pediatrician suggested SLP, but we thought we could teach him. At this point, I feel like we failed in our job. I called SLP last week and got an appointment for the assessment." I think this is a very good step (SLP = Speech-Language Pathologist.) He needs at least a good hearing assessment and you need some guidance. – anongoodnurse Apr 16 '18 at 12:50
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You are doing the right thing in getting professional evaluations. You are just going to have to wait for that. It's almost certain that neither of you did anything 'wrong' in parenting, but if something is wrong, you need professional guidance. And if nothing is wrong, then the appointment will tell you that.

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The snapshots guidelines (https://pedscases.com/sites/default/files/SNAPSHOTS_Developmental_Milestones_Chart_UPDATED_Aug_2014.pdf) indicate a red flag if single words are not reached by 15 months and two word pairings by 24 months, irrespective of the sex of the child. They also indicate that parental concern is reason in itself to see a professional. As such, seeing a SLP is a good course of action.

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