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My daughter is 3 years old and adopted. I've had her for 2 years now. When I got her she was crying non stop, now she will talk and laugh with everyone she meets.

I bought my little girl the newest iPad air 6 months ago to help her learn abc's and numbers and to entertain her when I'm busy, but it's gotten to the point where she can't go to sleep without her tablet, and she will be watching it even when I fall asleep then she's grumpy in the morning, if I take it she wont stop screaming.

Are tablets good for a child's brain? Are they harmful? I have heard of the radiation theory about brain damage from mobile phones but I do not know how accurate it is. I am concerned that the tablet may emit radiation that will harm my child's brain.

My question is twofold: Is the tablet good/bad for her developing brain and how can I take it from her without her screaming?

closed as unclear what you're asking by anongoodnurse Apr 3 '18 at 17:09

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Hi and welcome to the site. This is a Q&A site (not a forum for discussion, with which you might be more familiar.) As such, questions must be clear. If your question is, "are electronics safe for preschoolers", the body of your question invites a lot of opinion (you need not say why you're asking unless it's pertinent), and you need to specify what you mean by 'safe'. If you want to know how to wean her off her Ipad (which is implied), that's a different question. Please edit your post, and again, welcome. We're here to help (if we can.) :) – anongoodnurse Apr 3 '18 at 17:14
  • I'll update my question – hello moto Apr 3 '18 at 17:45
  • Your title says "Are electronics safe for kids?" but then you specifically ask about "radiation". Are you wondering if they are safe in general, or ONLY if the "radiation" has any merit? I ask because I think there are several other reasons why they would not be considered "safe" for young children. Oh, the current age of your kiddo would probably be helpful too. – BunnyKnitter Apr 4 '18 at 16:45
  • Am i wrong when i say this, when you wrap some copper around a piece of iron and hook it up to the negative post on a battery terminal, electrons come splurging out right, it's not until you give those electrons something positive to look forward to, that they start – hello moto Apr 5 '18 at 1:38
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    @hellomoto what you are talking about is a simple wire carrying current. This is not specific to phones, microwaves or tablets. By your definition, every single device that uses electricity to run emits "radiation" (and to be fair, even light is considered a form of "radiation"). I think normally "microwave radiation" is the concern from microwaves and something about cell signals is the concern from phones. You may find more specific information about the radiation thing by asking on the Skeptics SE. I'll take a crack at editing your question, feel free to roll it back. – BunnyKnitter Apr 5 '18 at 15:31
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Screen time before bed is a very bad idea. It will impair sleep, for adults and children. There are a ton of resources about this online, here is just one:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5390665/

I would want to see a lot of good research before believing that a screen is effective at teaching a preschooler anything.

If you need to use a tablet during the day for a breather, fine, but stop doing it at night, and I wouldn't be telling myself that I was doing a world of educational good by using one, because that likely is not true, no matter what the people selling the software want you to think.

I have no idea what on earth you mean by "radiation theory", but no, radiation from a tablet is hardly going to physically damage a kid's brain.

Some of the information contained in this post requires additional references. Please edit to add citations to reliable sources that support the assertions made here. Unsourced material may be disputed or deleted.

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    If you have no idea what the OP means about 'radiation theory", then you're conclusion is a guess. Also, I think this answer is unnecessarily hostile in tone, but it may be just the way I'm reading it, if so, apologies. Maybe just adding support for your statements will soften it considerably. – anongoodnurse Apr 3 '18 at 17:07

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