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My son is 5 years old and he is facing challenges with reading and spellings. He is able to identify and read letters like, a,p,p,l,e but not complete word i.e. apple mostly.

He is very good with visual things like identifying patterns, matching objects etc. and he is good even with numbers. He does not have a problem with speaking apart from a couple of letters like l and r, and he is improving his speaking greatly.

Please suggest me what things I can do to improve his readings and spellings? Also please suggest any apps that could be of help, as I understand e is good with visuals.

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    A friend of mine mentioned the same problem with his son. And the solution? One day something snaped in the little fellow brain and he jumped into the stage where he could identify whole word. Hopefully, your son will be the same case. – Divisadero Jan 18 '18 at 16:16
  • Explain to the child that the latin alphabet is phonetic, in the sense that words yield a specific sound. – user2497 Jan 20 '18 at 5:28
  • Have you considered an eye test, he may need glasses? – Neil Meyer Jan 20 '18 at 12:08
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This does not sound like a reading problem, but more like an unclear understanding of how learning to read works, which is understandable considering that learning to read is a very complex process. I experienced the exact same thing at that point with my own son, now six, who just started reading shortly before his 6th birthday and after a long period of what you are describing.

As long as he is in school (kindergarten, preschool?), my advice is to be patient, supportive, keep reading to/with him, and stay in close touch with his teacher(s). They should be able to give you a very good breakdown of his progress, where he stands in respect to developmental milestones, and what you can/should do to support him (and what not to do).

Learning more about what is age and developmentally appropriate will help you better understand where your son stands.

An example of such information:

Kindergarten (Age 5)

Kids usually begin to:

  • understand rhyming and play rhyming games
  • match some spoken and written words
  • understand that print is read from left to right, top to bottom
  • write some letters and numbers
  • recognize some familiar words
  • predict what will happen next in a story
  • retell stories that have been read to them

Source

There is not enough information to make a conclusion, but from what you have provided, your son may be well on track to reading in a timely manner.

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Read. A lot.

Seriously, read with him. Point at the words and read them one at a time. Teach him phonetics and how to sound out words.

Read. Read. Read.

You only get really good at something by practicing. So practice it. Read with him. Read to him. Let him read.

Did I mention you should read with him?

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