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My two toddlers (age 2 and 4) both snore during sleeping (usually at night). Is it too young for them to be snoring sleepers?

  1. What could be medical conditions?
  2. What are the preventive measures if it is a symptom to future potential health failure?

Did I feed inappropriate food which make them snore? Sleeping positions are also tried but I am open for suggestions. Their pillows are relatively low 2.5 to 3.5 cm. Late night sleeping and late morning wake up is one of the sleeping patterns. Breastfeeding is intermittent during night sleep.

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My son used to snore a lot, but we'd only take him to the doctor when he had a cold so the doctor never saw him when he was "healthy."

Eventually a doctor did hear him breath when he was healthy and ended up diagnosing him with oversized adenoids. His adenoids made it hard for him to breath at night, so he would snore. More importantly, they reduced the oxygen levels he'd get while sleeping, leading to sleep apnea. Furthermore, they blocked his Eustachian tubes leading to reduced hearing.

So, snoring might be nothing or it might be something.

IMHO: Get some data (how often, low long, sick at the time, etc...), possibly record them snoring on your phone and see a doctor,

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    My 2 year old daughter had the same problem. Her regular GP doctor kept saying she would get over it, and prescribing antibiotics. Finally I took her to my allergist who took one look in her throat and said "get her to an ENT specialist at the hospital". They scheduled her for surgery the next day. That night I watched her sleep and realized that she was sleeping contorted with her head thrown back so she could breathe, her adenoids were so swollen. A week after her tonsillectomy she was sleeping soundlessly and comfortably and she has never had any problems afterwards. – Francine DeGrood Taylor Feb 20 '17 at 20:29
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    @FrancineDeGroodTaylor - My son's adenoids were "the size of a lemon" according to the surgeon. There is a risk they'll grow back, but I think this abates by the age of 8 or so. – dave Feb 21 '17 at 2:09
  • My 2 years old son has a similar problem, only it's with his throat tonsils. Surgery is already scheduled. Instead of completely removing them, they're going to reduce the size of the tonsils so they still act as a barrier against infections, while leaving enough room for proper breathing. It's a rather common surgery in pediatrics. – walen Feb 21 '17 at 14:37
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Have you tried wedging the mattress? You put something under the mattress/over the box spring (if you have one), at the head end so that the child's head is raised. It could be allergies or adenoids, but many people and animals snore.

Asking your doctor can't hurt, but I would not worry about it enough to make a special trip unless you can't sleep, or unless you think it could be apnea.

LINK Dr Sears

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