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My son is 2 weeks old and is sleeping through the night. I bottle feed. I give him 4oz. During the day he will sleep after his bottle only 4 to 5 hrs, but at night he will sleep all night. For example last time I gave him a bottle at 8pm and now its 5am.

Is it ok to let him sleep all night like he does or should I wake up up for every feeding? Should I give him more then 4oz because after his bottle at 5am he is acting like he is still hungry?

This is my first child I could use some help...

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    How is his size? How much is he eating the rest of the day? – Joe Jun 22 '15 at 15:39
  • Regarding the amount of milk at each feeding; you should give him as much as he'll drink. If he seems hungry after drinking the 4 oz (about 120 ml, IIRC?), try to give him more. Generally, babies self-regulate the amount of milk they drink. – Silje Ljosland Bakke Jun 26 '15 at 8:23
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Ask your doctor. When babies are very young, they might not wake up when they need to to feed, and fasting through the night could be dangerous.

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    This is a good answer. My son was 4 weeks premature, and while not needing special care, we were instructed to wake him every 3 hours to feed him. I really think it depends on the circumstances, and for babies this young, general advice is not really useful. – Ida Nov 11 '15 at 0:29
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It really depends on the baby. Most seasoned parents would likely let the baby sleep and not disturb the baby. The reasoning being, 'If the baby were truly hungry, he would wake up.' Even adults wake up from hunger. Also, sleep is extremely precious to both parent and child. So by breaking the baby's sleep, you're screwing up a 'good thing' for both parties.

However, you really have to gauge based on your baby's growth and development. If you feel your baby is growing and thriving, then don't wake him up. But if you feel that baby could use the extra calories, either because of slowed growth, or low birth weight, or various other reasons, then you should definitely wake the baby up.

Formula fed babies tend to stay full for longer because its considered to be 'heavier' than breastmilk.

Last point would be to do what feels right to you. If you're waking up to change diapers anyway, or are unable to get adequate rest because you are worried about the baby not having eaten in several hours, then feed him.

If none of the above concerns are relevant, then rejoice in having a good sleeper and feeder on your hands and sleep the night away!

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