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One of the books I'm reading, "Your Baby Week by Week" by Simone Cave and Dr Caroline Fertleman, states in week 6: "As your baby becomes more sociable, he'll start to resist falling asleep because he'd rather stay awake and play. So instead of dropping off to sleep (...), your baby will actually fight sleep because he's excited about his newly discovered world."

As my baby sleep extremely little during the day, I was surprised to read this paragraph as I was suspecting that he's already resisting falling asleep during daytime.

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    As Ida said, they're all different. Don't take the advise in any book as a literal assurance. New parents are a huge market, so anyone with a PhD can write whatever they want but as you will find as you grow with your baby, even you will become an expert. We all could write a book about it. My kids resisted sleep since the second they were born. – Kai Qing Apr 2 '15 at 22:57
  • @KaiQing And mine resisted waking! We had to poke and prod him to wake up enough to eat. Now, he resists sleeps and naps, but also resists waking from them! – user11394 Apr 3 '15 at 3:05
  • @creationedge - Oh I know that all too well. You can try to time their naps and bedtime and for the most part it works. But every now and then they fall asleep about 6pm and you know it's either let them sleep and they wake up at 3am or battle the waking process and hope they get back down before midnight. Mine are 2 and 4. I get the best of both nightmares. – Kai Qing Apr 6 '15 at 20:41
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In my un-professional opinion, every baby is very different, and sleeps different.

I have 2 kids, and what it took to make them sleep as an infant was different, and how much they want to sleep is different.

Always remember those milestones, behaviors and so forth are averages, not about specific babies.

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The goal is to discover a napping pattern that works for your baby, or perhaps I should say, to gently coax your baby into a napping pattern. Obviously, in the early weeks, the pattern is no pattern! But as your baby gets a little bit older, patterning starts to become possible. This is a first step in a little one's maturation process, the process of learning self-regulation.

If you have any questions about this along the way, please write again.

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