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seen Apr 2 at 22:46

Oct
29
comment How do I teach my child to express his frustration?
Thank you for the alone corner idea. We do need a better place for timeouts, and this sounds like a better solution. His vocabulary is actually very good (several hundred words, uses sentences to request things). I do like the idea of questioning him about his emotions rather than putting words in his mouth ("I realize you're angry" doesn't help much).
Oct
27
revised How do I teach my child to express his frustration?
added 3 characters in body
Oct
27
comment How do I teach my child to express his frustration?
I'm a youth coach, I have some knowledge of concussions and the signs to look for. I hadn't thought it was quite this serious honestly, toddlers run their heads into things all the time accidentally. They're pretty sturdy. But the fact that he's much larger and faster than he's aware of does have me a bit more concerned about the consequences. Thank you for your response.
Oct
27
comment How do I teach my child to express his frustration?
Thanks for the advice. I'm still hoping to get some suggestions in the meantime.
Oct
27
revised How do I teach my child to express his frustration?
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Oct
26
awarded  Editor
Oct
26
revised How do I teach my child to express his frustration?
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Oct
26
awarded  Student
Oct
26
asked How do I teach my child to express his frustration?
Oct
19
awarded  Talkative
Oct
14
awarded  Supporter
Nov
17
comment Programming with a baby
@Jon - As I'm sure you know, the hardest part is that you finally find a rhythm and it changes the next week. My 14 month old moved his nap time an hour and all of a sudden I'm back to working late into the night. I'm lucky I adore both my job and my family, puts tiny frustrations in perspective.
Nov
17
comment Programming with a baby
@Jon, Not quite as clear as I'd like to the question. It's not sustainable. I get by, but there is a lot of added frustration on top of the normal parental frustrations. Everyone wants to get away from the house sometimes, and when you work from home and have an infant it's much harder to carve that time out. A designated full time caregiver gives you that opportunity to leave the house and be a normal human being here or there.
Nov
17
comment Programming with a baby
@Jon I'd say it depends on the person. I wouldn't recommend it long term for most people. My wife needs about 10 hours of sleep a night to feel good, I do well on about 6. Anything over 9 and I feel awful the next day. My wife teaches 18 hours this semester, she's cutting it back to 12 after this. It's just too hard on everyone as-is. We also have a lot of help around, I couldn't imagine handling it if it was just the two of us all the time.
Nov
16
answered Programming with a baby