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15

What I have found most effective is to teach them a coping mechanism, something active to do so they don't feel helpless, and give them plenty of time to employ it. For example: Okay, some water is coming. Close your eyes and mouth tightly so it won't get in! Kids often cry because they're scared of water getting in their mouth, which sort of creates ...


10

We cured the same problem in my daughter, INSTANTLY, with a cheap pair of swimming goggles. I showed her what they were, what they are for - she pressed them to her face, and that was it. no going back! The same pair got her used to jumping in a swimming pool, and to learn to swim. Now she's nine years old, and an experienced scuba diver!


6

Ok, not from a professional, but from a parent's perspective: It seems you have built yourselves a nice battlefield with your son - I sense a power play and a lot of unnecessary tension. A vicious cycle. First step: Stop this right now. That means, no yelling, no fusing and, above all, no force feeding. Try to eliminate this battle ground completely. ...


4

48-50C (118-120F) should be fine as a max temperature, according to Baby Center. As a rule, you should always test the water on a sensitive part of your body, such as the inside of your wrist or elbow. The linked article mentions that babies generally like it cooler, but your experience may vary. My son actually preferred it warmer (to clarify - not "hot" ...


3

It's hard to tell from the info in your question whether this is a medical issue or a behavioral one, or a combination of the two. It's clear that force-feeding is backfiring and not getting the desired result. We've followed the advice of Ellyn Satter on The Division of Responsibility for Feeding Kids, and it's worked well for our 1-year-old so far. ...


3

Every child is different, and the suggestions already posted are good ones. I would suggest one idea that I didn't see posted yet, which is to alternate between a bath and a shower with the drain open. My kids get somewhat fearful when the water is being poured from a cup or bowl, but for whatever reason they think the shower is funny. I started with just ...


3

With my oldest son, the problem was primarily the shampoo in the eyes (or the unsalinated water, but more often the shampoo specifically). What we do is keep his towel at hand, and as soon as we've poured water over his hair, he takes the towel and dries his eyes. This gives him some sense of control (similar to Thorin's mask idea). We also use a ...


3

This worked for my son: I let him wear a swim mask, and put his hand over his mouth when I washed his hair. Then, I let him hold the washcloth while I washed his face. Knowing he could pull the cloth away at any time helped him deal with having his face washed.


3

We took our 3 along to indoor pools (in the UK) from a very early age. Useful points we learned: kids that age get cold really fast, so make sure the kids pool is heated, or else watch for them getting cold and shivery: be ready with a fluffy towel and cuddles Initially just hold them in the water, then bounce them to make splashes to help them get used to ...


2

I would say bring some baby sunblocker. Even if you plan on being under an Umbrella. You can get burned even in the shade. Both my sons had alot of fun in the pool with me and their mommy there. They just didn't like it when everyone else was making alot of noise and splashing around.. But yes. for sure bring something for the sun! Also I wouldn't put her in ...


2

You don't want too low a temperature due to the possibility of legionnaires' disease. However, the hotter the water, the more quickly a burn will occur. Notably, children don't have quick reaction times to pain - they don't always jerk their hands away reflexively from a heat source. It can take less than 3 seconds to sustain a 3rd degree burn from 145F ...


2

It's sometimes better to use a "Monkey see, Monkey do" approach; I'm not sure if you have tried getting in the bath with her, and showing her that nothing happens to you when water goes over your face. My mom remembers that I used to have a terrible fear of water for a while, owing to an incident where I accidentally fell into the pool while playing tag, but ...


1

Great answers! My 2 years old daughter has a love/hate relationship with water, and she specially dislikes water pouring over her nose or mouth, which happened each time we washed her hair. What has worked of us is -as suggested by others- letting her take more control of the whole process, for instance, allowing her to pour water on herself with a toy ...


1

US CDC recommends 120F, which is 48.8 C http://www.cdc.gov/safechild/Burns/ Hotter temperatures are not much use for killing bacteria. Bacteria are dealt with by mechanical action or bactericides, not hot water. Warmer water might help with removal of dirt. Don't forget that hot water (and soap) can damage skin and that's likely to cause conditions where ...



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