Hot answers tagged

14

Not need a stroller: at around 2½ years of age. As soon as your daughter can walk adequate distances, the stroller is no longer technically needed. But of course the acceptable distance grows shorter when she's tired or in a bad mood. Even for you it can be very convenient for bringing along small amounts of necessary luggage. Not desire a stroller: at ...


13

I had taken a 'children camp carer` course a few years ago. They said there that while children can often walk a long distance - and are even willing to do it, they will suffer consequences of such strain in the evening or the day after. They supposedly may experience extreme tiredness, apathy, headaches, nausea and/or diarrhea. On the other hand, my ...


12

Unless she needs them to protect her feet, never. In the words of the AAP: "Style is the only reason for a baby to wear shoes at all until the child begins walking outdoors or is taken out in cold weather." First, the idea that her feet will get too big is somewhere between ignorant and harmful. Wearing correctly-sized shoes will not prevent foot growth. ...


12

Assuming your child's shoes fit well you will not cause foot problems by occasionally going on long hikes. (If her shoes are too tight, you might worsen problems like hammertoe, bunions, and so on, but the walking alone won't cause such problems and the real cause is the shoe.) Fatigue, blisters, and sore legs are temporary issues. The permanent changes you ...


12

I don't think you're going to find a list of 'age appropriate distances', because it's so variable by kid. My not-yet-three year old can sometimes walk two miles plus with no problem, while I suspect the average two to three year old cannot. From a physical point of view, the biggest dangers are short-term (exhaustion, dehydration), and long-term (damage ...


10

Put some toys on a sofa and maybe she will try to reach them from the floor, encouraging her to pull herself up. Or try to teach her to get off sofa or bed feet first. Having said that, I wouldn't worry about her not trying to stand up yet. Every kid has their own pace.


8

While a 13 month old may not be ready to stand or walk, they should be sitting and crawling. Crawling provides weight bearing through the upper legs and hips. Not crawling sometimes leads to later difficulties with sensory issues and some research has also shown later difficulty with reading/writing/visual convergence. There are several possible reasons ...


8

While falling and getting hurt are part of learning to walk. Here are a few tips that may help: She needs furniture without sharp edges to pull up on and help her balance. Keep a close eye on her to prevent her grabbing onto unsafe or unstable surfaces. A carpeted surface (short nap so it doesn't trip her) is a softer landing spot than ceramic tiles. Keep ...


8

You may have tried this already... get some toys/games that require her to stand up in order to play with them. One example would be a "music table" which has different buttons to push, levers to pull and things to spin around, each causing the toy to make different sounds and/or play music. In order to access each individual gizmo, she'll have to walk ...


7

At twelve months we put ours in the trolley seat - in fact even up to about 3 or 4 years old, as you really don't want the little ones tripping up shoppers with heavy bags etc. That said, when we did walk with them we would just say "holding hands or we need to carry you" and positively reinforcing that meant that pretty early on they would come to us to ...


7

Has she always been clumsy? I'm not a doctor, but the first thing that comes to my mind is a potential issue with her balance organs, in the ears. There are methods to test for that. There are simple physiotherapeutical manoeuvres to get rid of any disturbing material in all the loops of the ear, which might resolve it if that's the problem in the first ...


7

She is perhaps just not ready to stand yet. children develop at different rates, for instance I did not walk until I was 18 months old. It takes longer in some children for the neural structures which control balance and coordination to develop. I presume she is sitting and crawling? If so, it is probably just a matter of time and waiting for development ...


7

Our 11 month was similar to yours, and we encouraged her to walk. We didn't push her, just encouraged. My husband I would sit across from each other and have her walk between the two of us. We would gradually increase the distance between the two of us so she can work on her walking. The parent passing the child would hold onto the hip of the child for the ...


7

Watch her and catch her when you can, and comfort her when you don't. Learn how to judge the severity of the fall. Generally, if she cries, the fall isn't too bad. If she is groggy and does not respond, then you need to contact a doctor. Also carefully monitor the state of your child after a fall to make sure her condition returns to normal. If anything ...


6

From your description I'd say he's developing normally, so there's no reason to push things along. Also, the steps he's taking provide lots of balance training for him, so I can't think of anything that would be useful in terms of extra training. I think he's doing fine, and he'll be walking sooner than you think. And then you'll wish he couldn't! :-) You ...


6

If you have the funds, get a stroller that can accommodate both kids. In theory, you do not "need" a stroller for a child who walks well enough to keep up with you. In practice, it doesn't work that way, because toddlers and preschoolers get tired, and bored, and consequently difficult. Nothing ruins an afternoon out like an unhappy child. The common ...


6

If you absolutely must hold his hand (like crossing the street, or in the parking lot). Give him a choice, "Would you like to hold my hand, or be carried?". It gives him the sense of control and determination he is looking for but still gives you the peace of mind that you need that he is safe. If he says hands, but then still tries to get loose, he ...


6

The way we have been handling it is that we don't present him with a choice in the matter. If we're not in a hurry, we let him walk while holding his hand. However, if he starts heading in a direction that isn't where we want/need to go, we limit ourselves to very light tugs on his hand to indicate without pressuring him if he resists, coupled with verbal ...


5

At 12 months, even if he is a proficient walker (our son certainly was), expecting him to understand he needs to hold hands and go where you are going is a bit much. They want to explore the world and what fascinates them, they are too young to understand where you are going and why it's so important to go there directly or quickly or ever get there for that ...


5

You need to communicate to him that he has 2 choices. The first choice is to hold your hand. The second will depend on the situation and your own feelings, but something like: sit in the cart; sit on a naughty step; be carried (kicking and screaming!). If you get a tantrum then you need to ignore him or you'll encourage the behaviour. Additionally you can ...


5

I found this article that had helpful info related to this question here . Most interesting info includes: It takes most babies about 1,000 hours of practice from the time babies pull themselves upright to the time they can walk alone. The single most important requirement for walking: strong back muscles developed during tummy time while awake. ...


5

You might want to try a push-along walking toy or an activity table. Standing to play with water or sand will encourage her. Avoid any sit-in-walkers because there have been problems with them. Young children are at risk of achilles tendon damage; all children are at greater risk of accidents. ...


5

Anecdotally, we had entirely variable results with our 3. Our first probably got the worst of it, as once his sister turned up (when he was 2) he didn't really get any travel in the buggy, aside from a brief stint with a double offroad buggy... We used to take it everywhere with us until she was around 3 - as we like taking the kids for long walks, hikes ...


5

Well, I think it might be better if you could accept it, because she's just being a kid - I think you understand that, but it just pushes your buttons. My kids push my buttons, they like to throw books on the floor and then needle the books with their feet. I just pick the books up and die a little inside ;) To me the 'risk' you run, is her digging her ...


4

With our three we have noticed that every time they get clumsy they have a growth spurt, so much so that for the youngest one a day of clumsiness is enough warning for us to get the next size box of her elder sister's old clothes down from the attic in preparation. As their bodies undergo size changes it takes time for their brains to release accurate ...


4

The best thing to do is to stop trying to help, and stop anyone else who may be around from trying to help too. That doesn't mean don't engage with them or play with them but that they just don't need the distraction. Also fixating on it can become a problem. Stop being there to catch them, they're probably picking up from a parent that falling down is ...


4

Actually walking at six months is highly unusual, but "cruising", or walking holding on to furniture, is less so. The Denver II indicates that 25% of seven month olds can walk holding onto furniture (and while that test is controversial to use for diagnostic purposes, it can be useful to get a broad idea of when stages are likely to occur). My oldest ...


3

My little boy is 2 years old plus a few months, and since a while (3 months?) we don't use the trolley anymore. I could be a matter of life habits: we use our bikes when we go in the vicinity, and when we go further, by car, it is usually to places like lakes or mountains where trolleys are useless anyway, and then we bring a "baby-backpack". I also can ...


3

I have a 13 month old daughter who has been sitting perfectly since approximately 6 months, but she refuses to crawl, walk, or even stand either at furniture or with my support. She recently had her 1 year review with the health visitor who has advised me that this is nothing to worry about as long as she is developing appropriately in other ways (i.e., ...


3

Push walkers acctually delay walking. The child is not balancing on their own and instead of spening time crawling, which helps develope balance in a natural way, they are soending time relying on a push toy, wagon, or walker. The best way to encourage walking is to give your child lots of tummy time. Do not help them sit up, let them figure it out when they ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible