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26

First, let's talk about addiction. You say that you feel he is addicted, largely because he plays 25 hours a week, you "know that this type of video gaming is not healthy", and because it has adversely affected your relationship with him. Addiction, specifically in this case a behavioral addiction, is the continued repetition of a behavior despite adverse ...


18

As an avid gamer and software developer, I have never heard of a game called "Sauerbraten." I looked it up and apparently it is a first person shooter named after a German pot roast. It isn't a widely popular game created by a major video game company. It is an open-source community-made game. It also doesn't appear to be a very "good" game. Something else ...


9

I am a game developer, and probably guilty of over-exposing my two daughters to video games. I make an attempt to limit the amount of time they get with digital devices, but introduced them both to touch devices at a young age. (At least we don't have a TV in the house! I'm more against exposure to mass media advertising than screens per-se.) My older ...


5

Could you get something touchscreen for him? Our daughter loves playing video games on our phones and get Surface - she's a pro at Fruit Ninja and Angry Birds. She seems interested in playing games on our XBox One, but doesn't quite have the control figured out. Starting on the touchscreen might help him get the mechanics of playing games until the manual ...


5

I'm a fellow gamer, have been since I was 6 years old. I've played shooters when I was 8 (NES), violent bloody 3D shooters like Duke or Quake when I was 10, mature-language, violent and also bloody fallout when I was 12, and hundreds of various pegi-18 games after those. I'm not a murderer, I'm not particularily violent, I've never tortured an animal, etc ...


4

As a 23 year old son, that also play 25h/week, i must ask you: have you tried to invite him to do something together? like bowling, or anything that he likes? I ask you this, because i usually play games if im bored (understand that there are only few things that i really think that is interesting..), so, whenever my mom/dad ask me to go to a place that i ...


4

When it comes to video games, the main point to keep in mind is that they are not a baby sitter. Just like with artistic expression or physical sports, the important thing is keep engaged with them. If you don't enjoy the games themselves, just listen to the child. If they are having a hard time with a particular spot, just be there for moral support. All a ...


3

Your questions are very interesting ones indeed. And I admire your effort to share one of your passions with your child so early. I am a gamer myself and I'm planning how I'm going to approach my kids so as to not force my passion upon them (I'm the kind of person that can and will play almost anything, be it electronic or not). My advice has this main core ...


2

As a parent, you should pay attention to the ratings given to each game. The ESRB and PEGI are probably the best known. I do not know PEGI well, but I know the ESRB allows you to search by game name and you can see detailed descriptions explaining why that games has that rating.


2

As someone who once played video games a lot, I wish I hadn't played them quite as much. It's not the time spent playing games that I remember or have fond memories of (despite to this day having a strong nostalgia for some of the storylines etc. just as with a good film or book - but not the playing per se) Therefore now feeling like I don't have as many ...


2

I'm gonna tell you about my experience, not as a parent but as a teenager who spent a lot of time playing video games. Hope you'll find it helpful. During high school I spent most of my free time playing video games. And that was way more than 25h a week. Actually I could play more than that in a week-end. I don't think I was addicted, since when I had ...


2

We've found that giving the kids a 5 and 2 minute warning whenever the activity is changing helps make the transition much smoother. Doesn't matter if we are talking about swimming, playing outside, games or any number of other activities they just seem to be able to let go much easier when they know the change is imminent. For TV, we either allow them to ...


2

My experience with my son is that he built up to complex commands, mostly on his own. We started with a game like Lego Star Wars (which is great because of the co-op and drop-in/out features). Initially he could figure out running around and blasting things (two hands, one button), but had trouble with things like "using the force" which required using a ...


1

My children don't have touchscreen and enjoy video games, but we don't allow them very often (maybe once a week). I think we have started about one or two years ago, they would have been around 4 year old at that time. We have a Wii. We let them play with Animal crossing, where there is limited need for complicate controls (you can do many things, but you ...


1

Yes, you should limit video game time. I would assume your goal as a parent is to make your child self sufficient, and that you don't have plans to support your child forever. (Note: If you are independently wealthy and your children are going to inherit a substantial trust fund, this advice doesn't apply.) Video games as well as other forms of amusement ...



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