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7

The first thing is to find out why the child plays. As a pretty heavy gamer myself who has gone through a number of phases and reasons for getting lost in games, I know there can be many reasons why you get lost in a world of games. Once you know, here's some advice for three different kinds of players that I've been in the past: For the challenge When in ...


5

Appropriate? I'd say it's safe, has no small elements, isn't a choking hazard, is made of plastic and powered by low-voltage batteries, so even tasting it won't hurt. But should you buy one for your toddler? I'd say no. Consult these two articles from babycenter: tv watching guidlines for toddlers video games and toddlers While I understand what you ...


5

The Mayo Clinic says too much screen time is too much screen time, regardless of the device, the content, or the level of interaction. Our household has a "scale" of electronics time, depending on age. As the kid gets older, their time limits are tied somewhat to responsibilities -- they do their chores to earn additional time (privilege). There is also ...


5

The easiest way is probably to set a time limit lock using guided access. In Guided Access, which can have a different passcode lock than the main passcode lock, you go to the Time Limits section and enable that. The main downside is that it only allows them to be in one app - they can't swap apps. This is an iOS 8 feature, also, not sure if your iPod ...


5

I'd discuss this with your parents and then follow their lead. Props to you for stepping up to the plate and taking responsibility, but I don't think its actually your problem. All young children encounter scary stuff from time to time, and often will latch on to one particular thing as a focus for more generalised fear of darkness or strangeness. So its ...


3

7+ seems like a good age, but obviously that's regulated gaming. A CONSOLE IS NOT A CHILDMINDER. I got my first console (a Sega MegaDrive) at around that age. The great advantage of starting at about that time is that you're not dealing with "first exposure" in the middle of that critical 12-16 exam period, and you're not trying to combine a major shift in ...


3

It seems you had the right approach by giving warnings, maybe use some visual help with a timer for example ? That way he can know anytime what time he has left. I'm also thinking maybe 30 minutes might just be too short for him to enjoy the game at all ? I never played Minecraft so I couldn't tell... Being 9, you should be able to discuss the matter a bit ...


3

Screen time is something that should be limited for all children; at 0-2, it should be minimal or zero, as it does not support brain development in the same way that other kinds of (active) play do. It's similar to how you might learn a school subject. Method 1: Listen to a lecture, with an overhead/projector showing some slides. Method 2: Listen ...


3

Am I right to be concerned? I would say yes, most definitely. Kids can easily become lost in games for hours on end (I should know, I was one of them). I think my parents were thankful they had something to keep me occupied while they did.. whatever it was that they did while I was in my room. It was also something they could take away from me when I ...


3

My eleven year old was getting to the point that I would consider him addicted. He was either on the computer playing an online game or he was watching TV, which I considered even worse. At least there's some brain activity required for online gaming. If we asked him to do things (get ready for bed, bring your clothes down to be washed, come down to eat ...


2

Kids that age just like pressing buttons. Buy them a fake phone or computer and that will keep them busy for a while. A Gameboy is not only generally considered as unsafe for a 1-year old, but also your kid will get tired of it quickly like any other toy. (Let alone if he actually can operate it)


2

As the others already said, it's maybe too much...(and the fact that he probably will not know how to really play until he is 3/4/5) Nothing more to say... Beside that, here's a suggestion: When he really likes to press buttons/keys, maybe consider something like this: (only an example [it's an keyboard which can make animal noises and regular musical ...


2

Answer A Game Boy or similar is likely too much for a child of that age to handle on its own and therefore not an appriate toy for a toddler. Reasoning Consider firing up a game of Tetris: (If I recall correctly) You have to wait for the Nintendo Logo to move across the screen press any key select 1/2 players select mode a/b select a level All ...


2

The first step of getting out of any addiction is accepting the fact of being addicted. That's the hardest part. And it's behind him, apparently. Second step: get clean. In this case - make him not play at all. For, say, a week. How to help to complete this phase? provide alternative occupation - painting the fence, going to the movies, a family board ...


2

I think I have to agree with MINEMUN There are a lot of things about Minecraft that make it a really worthwhile game for kids to play, and the areas where most families run into problems are easily fixable. But there's really no getting around the fact that it's a game that requires parents to be involved if they want the experience to go ...


2

I'd say it depends on many things. It is definitely a good rule to make your kids finish homework before they play on their iPad, or play with their friends, or do really anything else. But I would say that you're looking at everything totally wrong if you say that these devices are just a waste of time for your kids, then go out and set ridiculous ...


1

It's sometimes hard to find common interests with your siblings. Denigrating their interests pretty much guarantees that they won't want to hang out with you. You are saying "What I want to do is important and what you want to do is not. That makes them feel like you are putting them down, and certainly isn't going to make them do what you want. If you ...


1

Back in my times I was out 24/7 and when I got back home I was too tired and went to bed... I don't even remember eating food, hell all I remember is hide and seek, tag and all other fun stuff we did back in my time! Ipad? Kids? That is a bad combination, have them go out more often. It's more healthy for them to be fighting each other than to play on their ...


1

Ex game addict from age of 14 to 18. Looking back at the reason why I played games so much is because I didn't enjoy life as much. Found life online to be more exciting than real life. Following reasons were to blame. Huge financial problems in family which caused both parents to work long hours and there was not enough money for me to be in various clubs ...



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