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17

No, there is no way to safely do what you describe. Please keep your children in their seatbelts and child seats at all times. I understand what you're trying to achieve, but even if you find a working solution, the risks are immense. Sitting upright with a relaxed head in a collision is safe. So to speak, if the head has already fallen forward before you ...


13

Based on my own recent experiences with international flights with a toddler: Duration: A 2-hour flight is rarely a problem; even in the worst scenario it's not long enough for you to lose your mind :-) I have no experience with longer flights with infants but I think 4 hours are still within reason, while 10 hours (transatlantic) could be a bigger ...


13

Yes, it's uncomfortable. No, it's not a concern. My personal experience (having traveled many thousands of km/miles in the summertime as a child) is that high temperatures while driving is not a serious concern. When you don't have A/C, then your best defense against heat is to be smart: Passengers will be thirsty. Bring lots of drinking water, but avoid ...


12

Buy a bunch of cheaps toy that the child has never played with. Bring something like a travel etch-a-sketch or some craft things that can be played repeatedly Ensure he has his midday nap, this usually knocks 2 - 3 hours off. Try and find other young children on the plane that they can talk to. This works like a miracle. Portable DVD player if there is no ...


12

Unless you're flight crew, frequent flyer or there's a solar storm, radiation is not a significant problem. The radiation comes from space in general and not significantly from the sun, so a night flight has pretty much the same radiation level. Physicians can assure pregnant women who are concerned about radiation risks during flight that, for casual ...


11

Personally, we always state up-front that we are bringing an infant even if the hotel doesn't explicitly offer any baby services and does not charge extra. I'd rather be open about it than having to justify "baby smuggling" later on. Of course we sometimes learn during booking that the rate increase is ridiculous, and then we simply don't complete the ...


11

Here are the best things you can do from my experience: 1) Do whatever you can to get bulk-head seats. These are the seats in the front of a compartment that have a bunch of extra space. This is great for when your child is awake and wants to walk around for a few minutes. It also allows you to stretch, stand with your child, and change diapers much easier ...


11

We just (yesterday!) came back from a 10 hour drive from Ontario, canada to MA, USA. It was myself, my husband, and our 1 year old. To go to Boston, we took everyone's suggestions and drove through the night. It may work for others, but it did NOT work for us. It was awful. We started at about 8 PM, and she fell asleep around 9 PM. All fine and dandy. ...


10

First off, this is not medical or legal advice, and no answer from a site like this should be relied upon; ask your pediatrician for the best advice. It is never safer for a child to sit in the front seat. (Similarly, it is never safer for an adult; the rear seat is simply safer in general.) The recommendations of child safety organizations are generally ...


10

I opted for the lavatory when we took my son on a plane. I should mention that I'm a pretty big guy: 6'3" or roughly 190cm. Standing in that lavatory, hunched over the rudimentary changing table... let's just say it wasn't fun. Or comfortable. Yet I'm not convinced in the seat would be any better, even if you ignore the issue of consideration for your ...


9

We recently took my 9-month-old niece to Europe. The flights were 6 hours for one leg and 2 hours for the other leg. We did not buy a seat for her - saving that expense was, after all, kind of the point of taking her to see the relatives now rather than later. As it was a full flight, they did not allow us to bring the umbrella stroller on board. This ...


9

The earliest plane trip I took with my first child was when he was about 2 months old. It lasted 4 hours and I did it solo (no co-parent)! Then when he was 9 months old, we did a trans-Atlantic crossing with my husband. My second son was 9 months old when we took them both on a trans-Pacific flight. That was long. :) They had a special bassinet with straps ...


9

We have taken several road trips that each were in the range of 700 to 1500 kilometers (per direction). Things that were helpful to us include: Have enough baby necessities on board. Think of diapers, wipes, baby food, and so on. Whatever is age-appropriate, just make absolutely sure you don't run out. Have a high-quality car-seat for the baby. This is the ...


8

When booking online, I indicate that I'll be bringing a child in the comments field. Those will generally be ignored until I'm at the hotel and then they can't tell me I didn't warn them. If you're booking by phone, ask for the rate first, make your reservation and when done, inform them that you'll have a small child but don't require extra equipment. If ...


8

When navigating subways and escalators with a toddler or older infant with good head, neck, and back control, you want a lightweight, compact umbrella stroller that you can quickly and easily fold closed and open, and a hinge, hook, or clasp that you can engage to keep it shut when carrying it closed. You can even carry your child and the folded up stroller ...


8

Try making it an exciting part of the vacation. "When we're visiting Fun Destination, we get to sleep in a hotel!" Don't focus exclusively on it, of course (who takes vacations just for the mattresses?), but get him used to the idea that it's part of the whole fun vacation experience. I don't know how typical my kids are in this respect, but they find all ...


7

In addition to @Squidly's answer, we found that it helped to let our son do what he wanted (within reason) and let him climb up the chair and crawl around. People generally didn't seem to mind and he was happy. Had we tried to "make him behave" (by which I mean, keep him in his chair) the flight would have been much, much worse. Also, book an overnight ...


7

I DO NOT recommend night driving--especially if your drive is in excess of ten hours. There are several reasons for this: If your initial drive-time is 10 hours, you should probably add another 2-4 hours of drive time with kids. So now your drive is between 12 and 14 hours. Even if you drive overnight, you are going to have to stop for fueling, food, ...


7

I just found a funny one :) i am 15 myself, so i know this one will be good :) WHO'S NEXT DOOR? If you are in a traffic queue making up stories about the people in the car nearby can be funny for a short while ie what their names are, what they do for a job, what their hobbies are, what pets they have, what their house is like etc etc. This tends to only ...


7

When I was pregnant, I talked with my pediatrician about traveling with my baby as early as 8 weeks. Here are some of his concerns (and some of my own) for traveling with a newborn: Airline Regulations: Some airlines require a doctor's note for a very young baby to fly. (For American Airlines, this age limit is 7 days or younger.) Airplane Germs: ...


7

Toddlers can be in the car for quite a long time, there's no set guideline - it depends on the child. As for routines that also depends on the child. I think what's happening is that your child is getting bored of long car trips. 3-5 hours is a long time for a child to be sitting without toys or entertainment. I'd suggest getting him some car friendly ...


6

Make sure you have something for them to suck on (pacifier, lollypop, gum if they can chew it) or their thumb - Just in case the pressure causes pain in their ears. My 7 year old has that happen about 50% of the time when we fly, and a piece of gum makes it better within a few minutes.


6

We haven't been to a Disney park, but we have experienced the Moomin World (in Finland) with our girls first time when they were 5.5 and 4, and it worked out perfectly. We could see they had a magical experience. I would say that children below 3-4 usually get tired too quickly to get much out of such a day trip, and sometime around 7 the magical era is ...


6

My daughter had a lot of fun at 2, but my son wasn't able to handle it well at the same age. For him, Disney at age 5 was the best thing ever.


6

I don't know how into books your oldest one is, but it might be time to start a new book or book series ;-) if he/she is into that sort of thing. Also...if your kids are at all prone to motion sickness, make sure you take some dramamine or something to help with that. As an added benefit, dramamine makes most people drowsy. I'm not advocating drugging ...


6

The card: I would make a few business-card-sized cards. Put one in a jacket pocket, one in a pants pocket, and one in his backpack. Hide one in his shoe if you're really worried. For more visibility, you could also give your son a lanyard with an ID card pocket and stick a card in that. I would laminate the cards to make them durable against water and ...


6

As requested, an addendum to Torben's answer as regards to cosmic radiation: The exposure due to cosmic radiation is actually about two chest X-ray images per flight, or 40 uSv, depending on flight height, latitude, and length. At 10000 flights, there would be definitely apparent effects, known as 'deterministic effects' because they can be traced directly ...


6

There might also be drawers and closet doors to open, and just maybe a hard corner on a table -- but generally, as GdD says, hotel rooms are pretty safe. I'm guessing the reason is a mix of insurance safety, and theft prevention. There simply isn't a lot to move around or pick up. The biggest problem is more likely the matter of the baby monitor's poor ...


6

What my husband and I have discovered recently is that your requirements can change significantly between child 1 and child 2. When we bought my car (6 years ago), it was a significant step up in size from my 4-door sedan to a full-size 2-row SUV. My son was born a year later. My daughter was born in July 2010 and my car, which obviously hasn't changed in ...


6

As DA01 mentions in his comments, autism is a gigantic spectrum. Strategies for how to deal with it vary widely - the person who could best answer this question would likely be the child's mother. It may be an uncomfortable question, but it's likely one that the child's mother is familiar with answering by now. If you're worried about coming across as ...



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