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21

Remember that quality is more important than quantity! I think it can be a bit easier to go overboard with toys for infants and toddlers, due to the volume you may receive from adult friends during baby showers and early birthday parties that may be more geared towards your family and friends than the baby's friends. Some toys naturally become favorites (a ...


16

To quote from The Future of Play Theory: A Multidisciplinary Inquiry into the Contributions of Brian Sutton-Smith: Findings from studies of war toys are diverse, if sparse. War toys have been found to enhance aggression (Sanson and Di Muccio, 1993; Turner and Goldsmith, 1976; Watson and Peng, 1992) reduce aggression (Bonte and Musgrove, ...


15

First of all, my advice is that you should avoid television and computers for now. He's too young to really benefit from it, and these things can train him to become even more impatient and shorten his attention span. I think this related question has several useful answers for you: How can I keep a 14 month old busy at some activity for longer than 3 ...


14

First off, I really like your motivation. My daughter is 6.5 months, and we don't have many toys for her (her toys could probably all fit in a grocery bag), but I am already thinking we have too many. I was talking to a friend of mine with 8 kids, and I think she has the right idea. She told me that she didn't go and buy special things for her kids to ...


12

Well, from my experience every new toy is the favorite toy. The interesting question is: how long? Much things and toys are interesting only for a short time and others will be used again and again. The more flexible they are (as Sarato describes in her answer What toys tend to be a child's favorite, and why? ), the longer they'll last - e. g. Duplo, ...


10

The main point is that kids crave and need stimulation and it's important for their development that they get it. So if they are not getting it from toys or from television they need to get it from somewhere. The best place to get that stimulation is from their parents. So if you don't use the alternative this can be a big task; it can be tiring and ...


10

I've had several favorite stuffed animals, and they all got very worn over the years. My mother did her very best in cosmetic surgery and that certainly extended their lifetime significantly. But in the end they all disintegrated, either because they were cuddled to death or because of that mice infestation in our garage back in the early 90's... By that ...


10

I liked what Beofett said in the How many toys are enough / too much thread. He suggested that the best toys are toys that you can create things with (crayons, legos, etc.). This held true for my brother and I as we were growing up-- while I only played with my easy bake oven for a few months, we played with our block set and legos for many years without ...


9

I decided to go and hunt down an answer for this because although so far we have managed to keep playdough in the kitchen, which has a wooden floor, it is bound to happen sometime. So, the official line from Hasbro is: “When attempting to remove PLAY-DOH compound do NOT use hot water or cleaning solutions of any kind. To remove PLAY-DOH compound from ...


9

Don't discount the restricting Lego to only one area! You really only have two options: keep the baby away from the Lego keep the Lego away from the baby Your 4 year old should understand the concept of tidying up, so if you let him play with small kits (which is probably best at first) then the pieces should all end up as part of the finished toy, which ...


9

There is actually some science behind those bright colors! Babies develop eyes, but not full sight in the womb - there isn't a lot to see in there. There is quite a series of steps in their visual development in the first year of baby's life. While baby can see color from birth, distinguishing between different tones of color is pretty difficult so colors ...


8

Whenever possible, throw them out. You can't, unfortunately always do that (well you can, if you're ready for the consequences of being responsible for ducky's untimely demise). I did this, which worked. Submerge the toy in a 70% solution of rubbing alcohol. Squeeze it quite a few times Repeat this process in hot (as you can tolerate) soapy water Repeat ...


8

I believe that the suggested age range is almost exclusively dictated by the risk of swallowing parts and other dangers. Generally, if my child has any kind of (safe) pleasure out of a toy, then I would not hesitate to let him play with it. Who cares if it's designed for a three-year-old? If my 2yo likes it, I won't stop him. (And it gives me a (false?) ...


8

Whether it causes resentment or not depends on how much say the child has in the matter. Kids often borrow their older sibling's clothing on their own. A lot of handing down happens even without parental intervention, as one child starts to grow out of something, they are more and more willing to lend it to their younger sibling, until it ends up de facto ...


8

I found quite a few scholarly, peer reviewed articles about play and gender-stereotyped toys through my university's library. For example, I found one article about child play assessment with male, female, neutral based toys. In the content of the study, work was drawn in that noted "female" toys exhibited traits such as being attractive, creative, or ...


7

There's no way you can make your child not like to play with toys, and no reason to try. You can't force these things, and your child will resent you for trying. If your child is playing with toys more that's his choice and you have to let him make it. He wants to become more independent, and that's a normal and good thing. If you want your child to ...


7

Penny Holland, who lectures in Early Childhood Studies at the University of North London, authored a 2000 study on the effects of a zero tolerance policy for war, weapon, and superhero play. Finding that studies that sought to find a causal connection between war and weapon play and aggression in children and later adulthood were unable to prove such a link ...


7

They make playzones (like baby gates but connected into a loop) that are designed to keep baby in. You could do this in reverse - use it to keep baby out - and make it a Lego zone. That way your older child can choose what room he wants to be in while he builds, baby can watch but not touch, and baby is free to explore the rest of the house. You could even ...


6

Our son started really getting into certain types of building toys around that age, wooden trains/tracks, duplos, and megablocks. Megablocks are easier to put together than duplos if you child is not dexterous enough for duplos yet. Spend as much time as you can doing physical (for him) things too, take walks together, or take a soft ball outside and show ...


6

There is a huge body of research out there into toy preferences, mostly dealing with gender and "gendered toys." I can find no studies on early toy preferences being predictive of later behavior, nor what makes a child pick particular toys. It is my experience (parent, preschool teacher) that toy preferences can be influenced by modeling from parents, ...


6

Sounds like he's a social kid with a lot of energy. How often does he go out to see other kids? How often does he get outside? My almost-three year old does play with toys, but he's honestly happier 'bouncing around' or outdoors. Kids are unique, and some tend more towards imaginative play with toys, while some tend towards social play. Overall, it ...


5

Part of the answer is around you creating an environment where this can happen - children learn directly from you and the environment. Take them to places where they can meet other kids - play parks, softplay etc You should interact with other parents to show a good example When at home, make sure you play with your child and interact with other adults and ...


5

I think it's a valid concern, but not very serious at this stage. One thing it's difficult to tell from the question is if your son's focused on Elmo when he's moving him out the way, or if he's focused on the instrument. If the latter, then over-excited grabbing at things is pretty normal and harmless for what is basically a bundle of instincts wrapped in ...


5

He can't share nicely with Elmo as Elmo won't take turns or offer an instrument when he is done with it. Instead, explain to your son every time he does it that Elmo is a toy and might break if you treat him this way. It is not about teaching sharing it is about teaching him to take care of his toys.


5

I find that I need to closely evaluate where my child is preforming (schools can help with this). Two of my children had excellent fine motor skills at a very young age and therefore were able to do some toys (such as beading) much earlier than recommended. As well, and possible more to the point, there is a law change about what is require at age three and ...


5

Do you have a kid's sized table? Something the four year old CAN do the legos on, but stand at so reaching higher towers and the like is possible. It works really well for the kids I baby sit. Small toys are played with only when an adult is watching and they are played with on the craft table. Then little brother can scoot around on the floor all he ...


5

Colours give more opportunity for language - "pass the blue block please!". Bright colours are appealing to some children. What's available tends to be good enough. There comes a point where further optimization is wasteful compared to other things you could be doing. Variety is probably good too. So a plain set might be fun as well as all the other ...


5

Steiner (or Waldorf) education emphasizes imaginative play. The idea with simple toys, in this case uncolored blocks, is that it requires more from the imagination. This is right brain development. The goal is to develop creativity. As others have pointed out, colors allow you the opportunity to use words to describe, to sort, and to build using patterns. ...


5

The overwhelming experience of parents is that individual children have strong preferences for certain kinds of toys, and that aside from a certain amount of overlap, these preferences tend to fall along gender stereotypes. That's not a politically correct idea, so people have spent time studying the idea, sure there must be some parental bias involved, and ...


4

4 things here 1) aesthetically speaking, i don't believe that a 6mo old baby can have too many toys. you don't know what they like, they don't know what they like. variety will let you discover that. 2) you will however see what they don't like; they simply won't play with it. you can easily focus the collection by identifying these things. do not hesitate ...



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