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9

Our Kindergarten, in Northeast US, required potty training to be complete - so the kids can go and take care of themselves. Kindergarten here begins at 5 years, in my area, so I would expect most kids be capale of doing this by themselves. In our DayCare when my son was 4 years he was expected to know most of this, and did pretty well with it, we did put ...


6

There is no easy answer or magical tricks that older/experienced parents are withholding from you. Its more of setting a positive and respectful environment for the trainee. Several months ago my 2.5 yr old was home for 5 wks with out daycare so I jumped on the chance for some toilet training. Having messed up a bit on her older brother a few years before I ...


6

I believe most kids around that age (ours included) think farts are a joy to be shared with everyone. The main thing we've focused on so far is that "farting is normal", and to make sure to say "excuse me" afterwards. Generally, the amount of laughter and attention he gives to it relates to how much laughter and attention we, his parents, have recently ...


6

My 4-year-old son has recently discovered the joys of farting, though we haven't had any embarrassing farting scenes in public yet. There is no middle-ground for 4-year-olds. It's sort of an all or nothing kind of thing which means either she's going to hold it in or it's probably going to be loud. It might be worth it to try teaching her to excuse ...


6

As part of the first time parent program through our hospital, we get partnered with other first time parents of similar aged children. My group consisted of 10 children all born within 3 weeks. Every one of those children was able to use the potty, wipe themselves clean, and wash up before they were four. From talking to teachers, they expect that skill ...


6

My daughter has the same problem. She's four and didn't potty train until this year. I highly recommend Dr. Sears Baby Book for this kind of stuff. Love him or hate him on co-sleeping etc. on basic behavior stuff he has some great advice. We tried some of the things in the book. Here's what's working for us. Breathe! Forget that they're 'too old' for this, ...


6

A few ideas/suggestions/questions: Have you spoken to a pediatrician about a physical issue? Does he watch you poop and then help you flush? He may be afraid, many children are, of allowing 'part of him' to be flushed away. Flush his poop down the toilet even from his diaper/underpants. Does he make any sign he is making? React to it FAST! Does he poop at ...


5

I've heard of a trick that worked with a certain kid years ago, but this kid avoided pooping because of a painful experience. Nevertheless, I'll describe it. The kid went to pee on the potty, but the parents also inserted fake rubber poop. Then there was a whole ritual of "wow, you pooped! look! that's great!" After that, the kid didn't refuse to try any ...


5

She might not be ready to potty train at just 2 years of age. According to WebMD: A child is considered toilet-trained when he or she knows that it is time to go to the bathroom and is able to climb onto and use the toilet with little help. In a study of children who started training between 22 and 30 months of age, boys were fully trained at an average ...


4

It seems to me that the other possible reasons for this behavior is: Your son does not like other people to see him doing his business or the result of it. He is attached to his potty and does not feel comfortable on others. I don't think you can do much about either except for discussing it with your son and letting him know that there is nothing wrong ...


4

One possible reason for such behaviour that wasn't mentioned here yet is that he might be enjoying this, while pooping in toilet might be "boring" to him. He is probably well aware that he shouldn't be doing it and that it's "a bad thing" so that's why he keep silent when you ask him why he's doing this. I would go and ask him "Do you enjoy doing this?" ...


4

There are many possibilities why your child has the response to the toilet. Something about sitting on it scares the child, or at least makes the child feel uncomfortable. If you think about what images or stories the child may have seen or heard you may figure out the source (if there is one). We found that having age-appropriate books about other toddlers ...


3

I started teaching my son when he turned 2 a couple of months ago. Take her to the "pottie" say every 30min in the beginning and every time she goes praise her for that. Encouraging her will want her to go more, because being praised makes her feel good. Also put some underwear on during the day and not nappies (only when she sleep you should put nappies ...


3

You should stop putting him in nappies immediately, or as soon as you are ready to toilet train ;-). At this point, he's probably pretty used to peeing in his diaper/nappy, it doesn't bother him...why be inconvenienced to stop playing to go walk to the bathroom when you've got a diaper? Peeing in underwear is much more uncomfortable for the child, as it ...


3

Some of the suggestions here are great ideas for a new trainee. However, this questioner is asking about a five year old and has been at it for a few years now. Take heart! Take a breath and realize it is unlikely your child is being purposefully difficult at this age and stage of the game. This answer is pointing out the possibility of encopresis, ...


3

I was like "what the heck could be going on!?" Until you said "autism".... Even if it's mild, this could be one of his antics, rituals etc... as odd as it may sound. I would have said make him do all the cleaning up of the mess etc. but I bet that would be hard with him. Rewarding like you are doing is a good idea. I've been working with Aspergers and ...


3

Ham and Bacon is on to something, I think. Given BBM's reply, I am offering this: You need to separate cause from solution; you can't attempt to solve the problem until you know what is actually causing it. Causes: Does your child only behave this way when he perceives a risk to lose toys or miss out on something? It seems reasonable that he's afraid of ...


3

Bribery! We bribed our toddler (just turned 3) with television, which he's normally not allowed to have. He also had conjunctivitis at the time, so he wasn't allowed to play with other children for fear of spreading the infection. So he had to stay home for at least three days with no other contact. Every time he wanted to watch an episode of his ...


3

As an addition to what already has been mentioned in other answers, there is a definite physical factor in play here too. Infants' arms simply are too short compared to their torso to reach down there well. Their arms grow long enough roughly around the age of 4, making them capable of cleaning themselves comfortably.


2

I posted the link to this question on facebook/twitter/G+ hoping some folks would come back here and answer the question. Several answered THERE instead, the best answer I think came from my mother, so I'm going to present it here on her behalf... though I notice she was answering "how" instead of "when". The consensus on "when" was "when they ask about it." ...


2

My son was out of nappies around 3 months before his 3rd birthday, and he certainly wasn't the earliest among his peers. It would seem to be the norm here in the UK for kids to be toilet trained by 3, and is usually a pre-requisite for attending nursery. He still asks for his bottom to be wiped every now and again though, and isn't great at washing his ...


2

I realize this was posted ages ago, but it struck me that your situation is somewhat similar to the one we experienced with my son when we returned to daycare after being potty-trained. Our son was perfectly potty-trained at home, but when we put him in daycare 3 days a week, he started having accidents. Granted, we didn't have any poo accidents, but we ...


2

Your child is starting to understand and that is good! As the parent of four children, I quickly learned that each child learns at their own pace...including the potty thing! The one thing we did that helped with our children was to take them to the store to buy "fun" undies (my daughter picked Barney...) All of my children responded with "I don't want to ...


2

The best way to get a toddler toilet trained is to encourage. Allow him in the room while you go. Another good way is sticker charts, get him to sit on the loo with clothes on and make a big fuss of it and work down to no clothes. Each time make a fuss and give him a sticker. Then get him to actually try and poo. Make a big fuss of it. He will like to please ...


1

Potty training is all about rewards, not punishment or pressure. Your child needs to want to use the potty, so you need to think about what will motivate him to do it. The reward needs to be immediate, not long term. I've found TV or using apps on a tablet to be the best motivators, when my children did a pee in the potty they got to watch a short program ...


1

You might look into a food intolerance (inability to digest), the most common being lactose intolerance. At this age (over 2) the digestive system is usually running fairly smoothly, as the child has had enough time to build a sufficient population of healthy bacteria. They are not "allergic", since there is no histamine reaction, and so is typically not a ...


1

Just a teensy addition of anecdata, but we went through something similiar with our daughter. Turns out she was both scared of pain (reading the books It Hurts When I Poop and Everyone Poops made a huge difference) and that not knowing what happens once the toilet is flushed scared her. We're in rural US on a septic system, so when we told her that her ...


1

You don't want to create a situation where a child is afraid to go on the potty, and the more pressure you put on the worse it will get. I'd back off potty training for now for 6 weeks or so and let your child calm down. If you are determined to continue then my advice would be to stop putting pressure on your child when it comes to pooing, in fact don't ...


1

My son is 2 months from his 5th birthday and just now started pooping in the potty. We have been frustrated for years, since he was 2 1/2. He started doing it around 3 and got a stomach virus which put us back at square one. Everyday he would poop his pants, he did not care that he did it either. I started putting the poop in the toilet and showing him to ...


1

Let him run around the house naked. This was how we potty trained mine. Make sure he knows what's expected, and then see if he poops on the floor, or makes it to the toilet.



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