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1

Three year olds are definitely old enough to understand 'real' versus 'imaginary/pretend'. My three year old has nightmares where a plane flies into his room fairly regularly; after the first few, I explained to him that it wasn't real, because a real plane can't fit in his room, and he clearly understands that now. Still has nightmares, but has a very ...


4

(What is it with toddlers and hot air balloons? Mine can't stand them either -- I think the floating blows his mind... what's holding it up in the air?!?) We frame the holiday in terms of playing pretend: "you get to dress-up and pretend you are something else!" I try to only have mildly scary things around, and also teach him it can be fun to be a little ...


0

I check on our kids every night before I go to bed, at which point I sometimes find them under the blanket, but have found various combinations and placings of blankets and children. They have been cold at times and lie sleeping curled up not under the blanket, and I tuck them in. However if they get too cold they will wake up and go back under the blanket. ...


0

I would say that he simply loves you and wants to participate in your activities at least by presence only. Later he will try to help. It seems, you do not trust much in him and are trying bad explanation instead of a good one. Of course, you are expecting the same distrust from his side. But now he trusts you much more than you trust him. If you want ...


2

My daughter is 2 and 3 months. We had been having problems with manual toothbrushes, so I was advised to use an electric one because they are more "fun" (I have never have an electric toothbrush so at first I did not get the fun part). I bought an electric toothbrush for her and it was an amazing experience. On the warnings at the back of the toothbrush it ...


0

Day time: I think, the best method is to wait for the child to be asleep . Make sure you dont take more than 30 minutes to " do it" Then check on.your toddler, again and sit beside him. Night: Also, to do it in night when the toddler, is sleeping heavily is the best time as you get lot of time & dont need to.hurry up. Closing the door (locking it) is ...


0

Not introducing natural spices and flavours will make your child picky - I'm 25 and exceptionally picky, which I put down to not having spice available (never mind encouraged) in my diet at a young age. Now I'm older, I love some of the blander flavours but simply can't handle others - there're too far out of my comfort zone and repulse me. Blaming my ...


1

My 2 year old loves to take baths. When we start getting freaky I run a bath & have my son jump in while we have sex in the room connected to the bathroom so I can make sure he is safe. This can give us up to forty five minutes sometimes :)


2

Another thing to keep in mind is that time and cause and effect are very fluid concepts (as NoAnswer said, abstract) in the minds of children. They don't, in general, understand the idea of "just a minute" or "in a moment." They have a need/want, and either it's satisfied or it isn't. They don't have a "progress bar." One thing I see a lot of first-time ...


-1

Moderation is very good. Once they reach a higher age like 5-6 offer it in moderation. I guess a rule of thumb is if they are too young to ask for it, then no. They don't need sweets impacting their early development and at that age the probably won't care anyway. Perhaps the best age to start is the age where they can somewhat understand the risks ...


0

When my son got a green pea stuck in his nose, I was told to come into ER to remove it. They said there was concern if it went further & he could aspirate it into lungs. The dr quickly removed it w/ a small wire loop. The next time it happened, a pinto bean, it actually fell lower in the nostril & he was able to blow it out before we got into car ...


0

If anything it is bad for the eyes. They are not meant for focusing on flat objects, 1-2 feet away, for extended periods. Our kids (5 and below) watch TV from at least 10-12 feet away. Those (kids/adults) who work on computers a lot should use reading glasses (+1 to +2 diopters) so as to reduce strain otherwise there is a good chance of Myopia. Generally ...


2

I agree with the other answers but want to add something: Up to a certain point in development children can't think abstract. If you leave the room, you're gone. Not like in "gone from the room" but like in "gone out of existence". The abstract thinking "I asked dad for something to drink, so he will go and fetch it and be right back with what I asked for" ...


1

This is perfectly normal, healthy behaviour for your child. He watches you in order to learn from you. Please don't do anything to make him feel this behaviour is in any way wrong. Simply go about your tasks with your little shadow in tow. Please don't take this the wrong way, but perhaps it would be worthwhile for you to try to understand your own apparent ...


7

From the moment a child begins to see beyond an arm's length, "stay curious" is their watchword. Parents are the first-born people to learn from, so they follow your example at all times. My toddler 16months old follows me to the toilet, sees me on the seat and smiles all the time. This happens at every toilet trip. Once, when I was to bath and I closed the ...


4

I think you're reading way too much into it. He's 2. He might be doing it because he likes to be with his father. He might be doing it because he's eager to continue with whatever he was waiting for you to do something for. He might just be habitually following people who are doing something for him because he's received positive reinforcement when ...


8

I would attribute his actions to "structural tension". Structural tension is the reason we still watch a movie even when we know what's going to happen next. Our mind is a constant prediction-machine. We're continually predicting what's going to happen next. This happens even when we're sleeping. When there is a constant sound in the background while we're ...


11

Both normal and sometimes rather annoying. Falls into the wide, wide category of things the Sears book calls "normal but bothersome toddler behaviour". When he's a bit older he'll be refusing to believe your explanations of things, that's a fun one too.


6

Our almost two year old does this, and I've never thought of it as a matter of trust (maybe I should!). I just think that when he's learnt how to do something, he's just saying and checking the procedure out of verification and the joy of knowing it. If we deviate from the procedure, he gets upset because he doesn't understand. While I'm happy with him ...


63

Children learn how to do things by imitating, so much of this is simple curiosity. ("How does the milk go in the bottle? Does it happen the same way every time? WOW.") But toddlers also start to realize they are independent and have some control over their world. I wouldn't perceive this as a lack of trust, necessarily. Rather, he is checking that you ...


5

Its not that he doesn't trust you. He may just be curious. My 12 month twins always crawl and try to see what I am doing. Young children and toddlers are wonderful creatures full of curiosity.


3

I think you.need to check this up with a doctor. Sometimes we may feel an urge to pee but only 2 or 3 drops come out, so she felt she peed whereas when u checked those drops must have dried or may be u were expecting a urine soaked panty so didn't realise that there were few drops . (Assuming this is not a medical reason) Another reason could be the ...


3

Assuming this isn't a medical issue (and for that, talk to your pediatrician!), I would wonder if this is one of three things: A need for attention. When you're wet, you get a lot of attention, right? Not all good attention, but sometimes any attention is desirable. A confusion of feelings. She's not wet, but she feels like she peed - like the muscles ...


3

This is a very good question. I think you might be able to find some product you can use year-round in many of the larger baby stores, like Babies-R-Us. During the months that the heaters are not working, there are corner cushions you can buy and self stick to corners. This is a picture of Prince Lionheart Cushiony Corner Guards: If you look at them, I ...


0

Is it inconceivable that she just dislikes the sound? The other answers are somewhat worrying in that they don't seem to consider the possibility that children like and dislike different things and something that is appealing to you may not be to them. I'm curious to know whether you think this in itself is a problem, or whether you're just worried that your ...


4

Most of the answers here appear to be about screen time, but it's also important to remember that YouTube is not designed to be a safe space for a child. For example, my son likes to watch Minecraft videos. Very often these have a very unsuitable adult voiceover, plus optional heavy metal soundtrack. Do you want some random teenager swearing and talking ...


2

The official recommendation from the American Academy of Pediatrics is: Limit entertainment screen time to less than one or two hours per day; in children under 2, discourage screen media exposure. "Entertainment screen time" is computers, tablets, phones, TV, etc. From: ...


3

Play with your kid, read good book for him, talk with him, teach him! The first thing we did while planning kids - we've thrown TV away. At all. We don't have a similar device at home. My daughter (5 yrs now) watches cartoons and programs that I choose for 15-30 minutes per day WITH ME on the screen using my laptop and projector. We speak about what we are ...


11

On the other hand ... I was making my living as a freelance graphic designer when my children were small (way pre-iPad), and was constantly reading warnings against letting children spend too much time on the computer. I read to them a great deal, and did other activities with them as a "stay-at-home mom." But since I was actually making my living at home, a ...


14

Beofett's answer is excellent, but I would like to add a few personal observations which were too long for a comment. Youtube, specifically, can be very hard to control. Our toddler (3.5 years) does get to watch stuff there, but you have to be vigilant. Examples: Looking at toys helicopters, easily browsed to real helicopters, then to some wartime ...


25

There is sufficient reason, imo, to be concerned. Research findings to date might suggest a correlation between television viewing and developmental problems, but they cannot show causality. Enough, in fact, that the American Academy of Pediatrics has issued a policy statement suggesting that children 2 and older be restricted to no more than 1 to 2 hours ...


-3

Go the Cold Turkey way and Never stay with the toddler.in.the bed till they fall asleep as.it may encourage their Attention seeking Behaviour. If this doesnt work, lock the child.in.his room and dont unlock till the next morning . ( but this is little harsh)


0

Lego Duplo are building blocks sized for toddlers, so I figured Lego probably publishes some Duplo games. Turns out they do! I found one and from there just clicked onward on the "related apps" that were listed.


1

I got the Discovery Animal Alphabet Video app for my 2-year old. There are several videos so that may help. I haven't tried the music yet but that may be another possibility. Pick music or videos that teach something and you are good to go. Aside from Mr. Pencil and playing with the pet it was all over her head until I discovered these. She never watches the ...


0

First off: Happy birthday to your son! 2 years old is a very interesting time for a child. By then, children have started to get a real grasp on the world surrounding them. They already interact with peers. In a few months your son is likely to start to become self-aware ("Bobby wants..." becomes "I want..."). Language and communication abilities are going ...


2

Getting used to sleeping in your own bed can be really tough for a child! If you try to do this completely and finally, cold turkey style, you're going to have a harder time of it. If you make it a slow change, it will be easier. It also sounds like your child has his own room, but also has a cot in your room? If that is true, I feel like that might give ...


1

my son was diagnosed with - 14 and -15 at 20 mos. he's been in glasses since then and it's essentially changed his life. I knew from very early on his vision was off - he wouldn't focus on me until I was very near, looked veryyy closely at everything, and has a mother with crap eye balls so I had a radar for it.. my pediatrician gave the 'go when I tell ...


0

Well my kids were good sleepers but I do have a suggestion, if he can jump from his cot, put the cot on the ground! Or get rails of some kind. Every kid is different but my son had an attachment to his binkie that was getting worse and worse, then we noticed that his front teeth had a gap, so we decided that he needed to end that. So I started telling ...



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