New answers tagged

0

You could spend a large part of each day with your infant strapped to your back while you pursue any one of hundreds of activities. I have seen young women with a baby in a front or back sling happily throwing pots, pruning plants, baking bread, hiking, shopping, and so forth. You could hand out flyers at the mall. Sacagawea Charbonneau explored a quarter ...


4

I work in a school and the way we deal with this type of behaviour is to remind the child that they must use "kind hands" when playing with their friends. We set clear rules that if "kind hands" aren't used the child will then be removed from playing with their friend for 5 minutes and have to sit in silence away from everyone. Then they are introduced back ...


0

Give the kid to the mother in law for a couple of hours per day, getting out of the house if necessary for some alone time. However, you will have to live with the mother in law taking care of the kid her way during those hours.


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Would part-time child care be an option? Even if its just a few hours a week, it would give you time to get away from the house, your baby and your mother-in-law. Also, if you can find something that involves getting out of the house on a regular basis, like a class, then you could rope your MIL in as a baby-sitter.


3

Your baby is a hobby! Your beautiful child is a commitment. At 15 months, you've been through the infant stage, one of the tougher ones. Your child is around the point where he'll/she'll be walking. This is the fun part! You're almost at the point where you can take your baby to the park. He'll want to take little walks outside, or get pushed in a buggy. ...


2

I 100% agree with all the posts above! A couple of things to add. First, I'm not going to advise regarding your disatisfaction with your mother-in-law because that's, like, a whole different issue. Second, it sounds like there's some stuff going on under the surface. Like, the lack of a hobby is a symptom of a larger issue at play. I don't play a therapist ...


1

Based on my experience Answering this as someone who decided to quit work and be a stay at home mum to raise my son. Leaving work can be frustrating especially when you know you're not used to being a stay at home mum. At first I thought I couldn't make it but I gathered courage by simply looking for a hobby like you've asked. In my situation, I did ...


4

I think the critical part to finding more time is to let go of the need to "just to look after your child". As parents we might think that doing constant activities with and for the child is our job, when in fact: The more we do (or toys do)… the less our child does the more our child thinks she needs us (or toys) to do for her the less ...


3

Part of the challenge here is to not just use the baby's sleeping time. At 15 months old you should be able to get time for something like reading many times through the day, as they no longer need you 24/7. Reading should be something you can pick up and do at any time - even if it's just a page - so make the most of when your baby is occupied with a toy ...


1

I found that switching to e-Books (e.g. through the Kindle, iBooks, or Kobo apps on your phone, or tabled, or through dedicated readers) helps a situation such as you describe a bit, in that when you have a moment of time, you can immediately pick up your book at the exact spot you stopped before.


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While some common sense care and supervision is always a good thing, Lego doesn't seem to be particularly dangerous. I coulnd't find any reliable information of a confirmed fatality with choking on Lego. There was a babysitter that claimed a child's severe injury to be Lego related but that seems more like defense (http://www.dallasnews.com/news/community-...


4

A friend of ours solved this by having a play pen, and putting the bigger kid in it. Of course he could climb out at any time, but in the pen his little brother couldn't get at his toys.


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There are two options. You could buy or make a cover, and this will work for a while, in your house. It will not however sort out the same problem when you visit other places, so a much better solution than child-proofing your house, is to house proof your child. Be with them when playing. Guide them. Tell them no when they try to play with things they ...


0

I used to be kind of like this. I was also in a daycare center, and I just didn't like the other kids... except one girl who made me laugh with funny faces and who I always looked for, as soon as I was dropped off there. Since I didn't see that girl that often, I suspect she was from another group of kids. I don't really know why I didn't like the kids. I ...


1

First we need to know why children tell lie. Because of Loss: if they feel that you can take something from them like their toys, room or you can stop them from going outside, playing with other children, eating ice cream or any kind of loss they may face Pain: If you can beat them or scold very harshly Embarrassment: Scolding in front of their friends, ...


5

I generally try to ignore the lie completely. Children have a slightly odd relationship with the truth, in that they still don't quite understand the barrier between fiction and reality. My script is generally this: Me: "Squiggles, why did you draw on the wall?" (Note: Never "did you", always "why did you") Squigs: "I didn't." Me: "Well then ...


3

Why ask if you knew it was her? At that age, their thought and speech isn't totally developed even if they look like it. Sometime they "lie" but what they are saying is "I wish I didn't". Your punishment might be wrong, try to look at "natural" punishment. In your example, if she drew on the wall, she should clean it up. "I see you drew on the wall, we draw ...


6

First off, don't treat truth telling as a special event, ie. something that deserves rewards beyond a simple "thank you for being honest". Telling the truth should be normal, expected behavior. If truth telling becomes something that is motivated by rewards, it will only last as long as the rewards do or as long as the rewards are sufficient motivators. (...


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Put a paper on the wall where she can draw. She obviously need it, and screaming when she lies about it, or punishing by removing toys when she tells the truth will not make your kid move forward


3

The right course of action really depends on the child. Each child has a different way they learn. There's no hard and fast rule that you can apply, but one thing is for sure: don't let your kid get away with lying. From my own personal experience, the fear of being punished for lying just led to me lying even more (even though I wasn't really punished that ...


2

Children will break things and break the rules from time to time. We have a simple rule system in our family: Make a mistake and immediately confess (ideally with an apology): Reduced consequences - you get a "bonus" for honesty. For small children, we used this as an occasion to emphasize the importance of being honest and to again explain the rules ...


-1

Or think of some creative ideas for books like ones with rising characters out of pages or personalized one. Especially for the toddler, he would be definitely interested in being a hero of his own book! I ordered one for my stepson last month from a site that customizes books using the customer's name, and he was so happy!


2

From the literature I've read, I believe sometimes after 2 or maybe closer to 3 years old. But don't worry, if the child understands when you talk to him, in any of the languages, that's a good sign he won't have major problems. There are some studies that say the speech can be delayed, but others do not agree. Here's one link that explains a few things ...


2

In Germany, the official recommendation is that newborns should not use a blanket during the first year. Instead, they should sleep: on their back in a sleeping bag in their own bed (though in the parent's room) on a firm mattress without anything else (blankets, toys, pillows) in the bed Source: Schlafempfehlungen für das 1. Lebensjahr, from the ...


0

Even the same thing was with my nephew as he was not much interested to ride the bike. One of our neighbor bought bike to ride for his son. Once my LO saw him riding a bike he was ready to ride along with the other kid. Children want to participate, especially when they see other children have so much fun.


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You have to make bed time seem like fun time. By the time your child becomes a teen they only want to sleep, I know because I am a teen. Let your child run wild until they get to tired and just go to be on their own. Camamille tea, a nice tea will help with sleep. If they don't want it make them drink it anyway Hospital Bed straps, they won't get up.


2

I have a daughter that is a "southpaw." We stated it up front to her teachers in school, and she hasn't had any problem. In our kids classroom, the scissors are ambidextrous. The hardest part for her is using her right hand to use a computer mouse. I think this is an okay thing to make her use her right hand for, since all computers she encounters (that ...


1

My Grandson got one at 2. He was interested but only for a few minutes at a time. Then Gramma brought up her bike. took off the pedals and rode with him. He did exactly as I did, no coaching - he just got it. He is 2.5 years old now and we can go for hour long bike rides. he on his balance bike, me on pedal bike. (I kept the pedals off for 2 weeks and we ...


2

It is a very common problem. I've been to plenty of houses that looked like the way you described yours. But I think the problem has several causes: 1) Too many accessible toys. The bulk of the toys needs to be in an area or closet where kids cannot get to. Kids love unpacking so they'd unpack whatever they can put their hands on. If the toys are out of ...



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