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When raising our baby, the changing table was one good place for practicing sound mimicry. I would make a sound, and she would try to imitate. We started with vowel sounds, then work on consonant sounds. Each time she figured out how to form her lips, teeth and tongue to make the sound correctly, I would respond with excitement and laughter. She loved it, ...


3

Your daughter is about the same age as my second son (also 20 months), and he is a very interesting case in this regard. He's demanded food that could be chewed since, no joke, 4 months old; no mash for him, only at least vaguely toothy food. But, he often doesn't chew still to this day - mashes it around and then tries to swallow, but doesn't properly ...


13

That particular irrational fear is common. Take her fears seriously, because they're real to her. Explaining that they are unfounded doesn't work, nor does smiling at or dismissing her fears. If you're reassuring and comforting, she'll learn one more reason to trust you with her feelings (really important) and that it's okay to feel afraid. Then you can work ...


-3

Sometimes it can indicate a silent seizure disorder called absent seizures and if the seizures are not treated the child can just descend into a condition that mimics autism when it's really just a seizure disorder! Staring spells help to differentiate !


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Hungry ? (She drinks her last bottle of milk around 8pm.) Could well be hungry. Offer her more milk (when she cries in the night) and see if it helps. Maybe teething? (every night, don't think so) Could be every night. Tried teething gel? Tried baby painkiller e.g. Calpol Infant? On a scale of 1 to 10 (where "1" is "I am mildly concerned ...


1

We simply didn't go to church, pray, or talk much about God in our home because, well, being atheists, God and religion aren't an issue we spend time on. Round about second grade, it came up with our oldest. She asked what church was, and why people went there. I think it was annoying that so many of her friends were unavailable on Sundays. We told her some ...


-1

I'd say, when they're old enough to properly understand religion if you explained it to them. When they're young, they aren't old enough to actually understand. They simply unquestioningly believe whatever is taught to them. I've got to ask, if you don't believe in God why would you be letting your child be raised with religion, only to have to explain at a ...


0

Your friend is completely out of line by not allowing your child to physically restrain the 2 year old to avoid being hit. This is a perfectly reasonable, non-aggressive response. If the 2 year old doesn't like it, then she will eventually learn that it is her hitting behavior which is causing this undesirable outcome (being restrained). Your friend is ...


1

Young children tend to sleep a lot more deeply than adults, so I don't think this is something you can teach them. Even if your child learns how to do this while she's awake, she most likely wont be able to do it in her sleep. We just try to always use very light (but warm) duvet's rather than much heavier blankets. This tends to help prevent them getting ...


1

I firmly believe that when a parent brings their child to a shared play area or play group, then they confer to the rest of the attending guardians the right to interact with that child. (I also believe that each attending guardian has a shared responsibility to ensure the safety of the children and the surrounding property.) In this case, if another child ...


1

One of the most important concerns for a young child is to not have the things they are using taken away from them. Allowing another kid to take your child's toy is not sending the message you need to share it sends the message you cannot be confident that I will protect your right to keep using the toy. You need to take the toy back from the other child ...


2

The other parent seems to have taken a cue from you.* You didn't say anything and let the her deal with it, which sends the message that it doesn't bother you on behalf of your son. And when that happens repeatedly, the simpler path for her to take was just let her child have the toy -- that way, it doesn't get stolen anymore and she doesn't have to ...


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Have you considered co sleeping? This way you dont have to worry about A hurting your younger baby B. Once your younger kid attains 3 years of age, you can shift him.in the same bedroom of A. So this way, they will have a playroom and a bedroom.


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This sounds like a pretty classic case of "night terrors", named not because the baby is terrified, but because he appears to be terrified. Typically, it is seen in preschoolers (as early as 5 month, but peaks at 3.5 years of age) occurs at the same time after falling asleep every night in the early part of sleep happens during deep non-REM sleep when ...


6

This situation is going to recur for years. Develop a long-term strategy for dealing with it based on what is best for your son, not necessarily what is fair. At this age, he's not going to learn any significant lesson from any behavior you choose as long as it's not frightening to him. There are plenty of reasons to stop someone from snatching a toy: value ...


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As a child, I experienced this frequently. It turned out to be night terrors which caused hyperventilating which worsened the night terrors and so on... One thing that my mother did with me was tell me to imagine myself falling asleep in a superman cloak which was impervious to everything. Children are incredibly susceptible to suggestion. I think this ...


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Answering my own question here: What worked was getting her to eat more. The main trick in doing that was to give her one thing at a time. in reverse order of desirability. So, if we had spaghetti and meatballs, we would first give her some vegetables to eat, then some meatballs and lastly the yummy creamy pasta. This way she would eat vegetables until ...


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Put a bell on their doorway.. or something noisy in the hall.. my kids were like ninjas..


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My wife and I largely resisted any of the corner guard things. It was simply not possible to cover every possible edged surface and in the end we just ended up covering none of them. We're approaching age two and no brain trauma or major blood loss so it seems to have worked out okay. If you're really feeling like you need a cover for those things when ...


0

To add to Ida's answer. We had the random luck to talk to someone who is a psychologist and she explained the "way he thinks" about me leaving. He's got used to me leaving for long periods so now every time I leave he thinks it will be that long He thinks that if he clings to me, I can't leave without him Whereas its extremely rare for mum to leave, ...


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My toddler is much younger, but I still take similar approach of explaining things to him. I try to explain everything I can to him (at this stage, it's helping to expand his vocabulary and understand of language.) I always try to explain things to children in a context they can understand, without condescending to them because of their age. You offered: ...


2

Our six year old daughter put on a Darth Vader costume, with mask, early in the month, and it completely freaked our two year old son out. She'd lift the mask up and he'd be fine, she'd put it down and he'd freak out again. We talked about how it was really her under there, and she was just pretending, but he had none of it. After a few minutes of this, ...


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my style has been to explain that there's really no such thing as ghosts or monsters, they're just stories and toys I think you're already doing it right. My wife's preference is to not even bother with theory, and just frame things in practical ways he understands: "The ghost lives in the shop with his ghost friends. It doesn't like sunlight and ...


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When we make scary things fun, they're no so scary any more. So we have a big party and learn to not be scared and eat candy.


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My oldest child was 4 the first time she went trick or treating. When she was 3, she stayed in with me and gave out the candy. She got the leftovers from the bowl when it is over. That was enough excitement for her and got her used to the idea. The next year, she went out with her younger brother (with Dad as escort). I never took my kids into those ...


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A few things to keep in mind: Kids go through phases of who they like 'the most'. That is normal, and you have to accept it. I can be hard - but it doesn't mean they don't like you at all. Your wife might see more crying since she is with him for more hours. (It sounds like she stays home with him) It can also be that your wife is correcting him when he ...


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Three year olds are definitely old enough to understand 'real' versus 'imaginary/pretend'. My three year old has nightmares where a plane flies into his room fairly regularly; after the first few, I explained to him that it wasn't real, because a real plane can't fit in his room, and he clearly understands that now. Still has nightmares, but has a very ...


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(What is it with toddlers and hot air balloons? Mine can't stand them either -- I think the floating blows his mind... what's holding it up in the air?!?) We frame the holiday in terms of playing pretend: "you get to dress-up and pretend you are something else!" I try to only have mildly scary things around, and also teach him it can be fun to be a little ...


0

I check on our kids every night before I go to bed, at which point I sometimes find them under the blanket, but have found various combinations and placings of blankets and children. They have been cold at times and lie sleeping curled up not under the blanket, and I tuck them in. However if they get too cold they will wake up and go back under the blanket. ...


0

I would say that he simply loves you and wants to participate in your activities at least by presence only. Later he will try to help. It seems, you do not trust much in him and are trying bad explanation instead of a good one. Of course, you are expecting the same distrust from his side. But now he trusts you much more than you trust him. If you want ...


2

My daughter is 2 and 3 months. We had been having problems with manual toothbrushes, so I was advised to use an electric one because they are more "fun" (I have never have an electric toothbrush so at first I did not get the fun part). I bought an electric toothbrush for her and it was an amazing experience. On the warnings at the back of the toothbrush it ...


0

Day time: I think, the best method is to wait for the child to be asleep . Make sure you dont take more than 30 minutes to " do it" Then check on.your toddler, again and sit beside him. Night: Also, to do it in night when the toddler, is sleeping heavily is the best time as you get lot of time & dont need to.hurry up. Closing the door (locking it) is ...


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Not introducing natural spices and flavours will make your child picky - I'm 25 and exceptionally picky, which I put down to not having spice available (never mind encouraged) in my diet at a young age. Now I'm older, I love some of the blander flavours but simply can't handle others - there're too far out of my comfort zone and repulse me. Blaming my ...


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My 2 year old loves to take baths. When we start getting freaky I run a bath & have my son jump in while we have sex in the room connected to the bathroom so I can make sure he is safe. This can give us up to forty five minutes sometimes :)


2

Another thing to keep in mind is that time and cause and effect are very fluid concepts (as NoAnswer said, abstract) in the minds of children. They don't, in general, understand the idea of "just a minute" or "in a moment." They have a need/want, and either it's satisfied or it isn't. They don't have a "progress bar." One thing I see a lot of first-time ...


-1

Moderation is very good. Once they reach a higher age like 5-6 offer it in moderation. I guess a rule of thumb is if they are too young to ask for it, then no. They don't need sweets impacting their early development and at that age the probably won't care anyway. Perhaps the best age to start is the age where they can somewhat understand the risks ...


0

When my son got a green pea stuck in his nose, I was told to come into ER to remove it. They said there was concern if it went further & he could aspirate it into lungs. The dr quickly removed it w/ a small wire loop. The next time it happened, a pinto bean, it actually fell lower in the nostril & he was able to blow it out before we got into car ...


0

If anything it is bad for the eyes. They are not meant for focusing on flat objects, 1-2 feet away, for extended periods. Our kids (5 and below) watch TV from at least 10-12 feet away. Those (kids/adults) who work on computers a lot should use reading glasses (+1 to +2 diopters) so as to reduce strain otherwise there is a good chance of Myopia. Generally ...


0

I agree with the other answers but want to add something: Up to a certain point in development children can't think abstract. If you leave the room, you're gone. Not like in "gone from the room" but like in "gone out of existence". The abstract thinking "I asked dad for something to drink, so he will go and fetch it and be right back with what I asked for" ...


1

This is perfectly normal, healthy behaviour for your child. He watches you in order to learn from you. Please don't do anything to make him feel this behaviour is in any way wrong. Simply go about your tasks with your little shadow in tow. Please don't take this the wrong way, but perhaps it would be worthwhile for you to try to understand your own apparent ...


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From the moment a child begins to see beyond an arm's length, "stay curious" is their watchword. Parents are the first-born people to learn from, so they follow your example at all times. My toddler 16months old follows me to the toilet, sees me on the seat and smiles all the time. This happens at every toilet trip. Once, when I was to bath and I closed the ...


5

I think you're reading way too much into it. He's 2. He might be doing it because he likes to be with his father. He might be doing it because he's eager to continue with whatever he was waiting for you to do something for. He might just be habitually following people who are doing something for him because he's received positive reinforcement when ...


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I would attribute his actions to "structural tension". Structural tension is the reason we still watch a movie even when we know what's going to happen next. Our mind is a constant prediction-machine. We're continually predicting what's going to happen next. This happens even when we're sleeping. When there is a constant sound in the background while we're ...


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Both normal and sometimes rather annoying. Falls into the wide, wide category of things the Sears book calls "normal but bothersome toddler behaviour". When he's a bit older he'll be refusing to believe your explanations of things, that's a fun one too.


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Our almost two year old does this, and I've never thought of it as a matter of trust (maybe I should!). I just think that when he's learnt how to do something, he's just saying and checking the procedure out of verification and the joy of knowing it. If we deviate from the procedure, he gets upset because he doesn't understand. While I'm happy with him ...


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Children learn how to do things by imitating, so much of this is simple curiosity. ("How does the milk go in the bottle? Does it happen the same way every time? WOW.") But toddlers also start to realize they are independent and have some control over their world. I wouldn't perceive this as a lack of trust, necessarily. Rather, he is checking that you ...


5

Its not that he doesn't trust you. He may just be curious. My 12 month twins always crawl and try to see what I am doing. Young children and toddlers are wonderful creatures full of curiosity.


3

I think you.need to check this up with a doctor. Sometimes we may feel an urge to pee but only 2 or 3 drops come out, so she felt she peed whereas when u checked those drops must have dried or may be u were expecting a urine soaked panty so didn't realise that there were few drops . (Assuming this is not a medical reason) Another reason could be the ...


3

Assuming this isn't a medical issue (and for that, talk to your pediatrician!), I would wonder if this is one of three things: A need for attention. When you're wet, you get a lot of attention, right? Not all good attention, but sometimes any attention is desirable. A confusion of feelings. She's not wet, but she feels like she peed - like the muscles ...


3

This is a very good question. I think you might be able to find some product you can use year-round in many of the larger baby stores, like Babies-R-Us. During the months that the heaters are not working, there are corner cushions you can buy and self stick to corners. This is a picture of Prince Lionheart Cushiony Corner Guards: If you look at them, I ...



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