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1

My older son, also age 3, is afraid to be alone and has had similar difficulties going to bed. I found that firmness and absolute consistency were the key. Otherwise, that small amount of random attention you give him (an extra snuggle, some extra conversation, etc) ends up being as addictive as a Las Vegas slot machine, and he'll keep pushing your buttons ...


2

It seems to me from your question that a few things could be going on. Is he not tired? If he is still taking naps, he may not need them any more, or his bedtime is too early. He might need less sleep than he used too. Does he have any choices? The second thing it sounds like could be going on is that he wants to run the show. I find that at 3 years, ...


1

Does he take naps during the day? That was the main problem here. We put him to bed in a normal manner 3 or 4 times, after that we just lay him in his bed and leave the room. All without talking or tucking him in. In my opinion the less attention you give him the better. He knows what is expected and eventualy it will get easier (in our case the problem ...


1

That's the schedule my 3 year old has been on the last year, except he wakes a bit earlier. Removing naps doesn't help, and moving to earlier wake-up doesn't make much of a difference either. What does help is going outside late in the day. We go almost every day on a walk to the park a block away from after dinner to dark. This is only possible in the ...


2

Your going to have to shift the schedule upwards and wake him earlier, either that or cut out the nap (when he is capable of skipping naps). My toddler goes to school only three days a week, and when she does she wakes up at 6:30am, she takes a nap anywhere from 12:30-1:30 till about 2 or 3. On those days she falls asleep by 8pm naturally, I could not ...


0

First of all, don't panic. A lot of hearing issues are correctable, and you've caught it relatively early. Even if it turns out to be a non-correctable hearing issue or a learning disability, it's not the end of the world. As you've already noticed, his condition, whatever it is, doesn't prevent him from communicating his needs, and doesn't prevent him ...


2

My child is the same way. She is 3 years old and was prescribed a -2.5 diopter pair of glasses for a -4.0 diopter evaluation. I have not been able to tell of any difference in her vision either. In fact, she used to watch the television from really close but since she got the glasses we don't let her watch as much but also enforce a certain distance; but ...


4

I suspect you would like your son to sleep earlier so you have some time with your spouse, or "me time", which I totally understand. A child isn't going to sleep if he/she isn't tired. Your boy's getting a good amount of sleep for his age, so cutting down on his sleep isn't the way to go, but adjusting the pattern can be done. Simply wake him up earlier, ...


1

#1, #2 and #7, three you haven't done, are what made the BIG difference for our little girl (2 years old). #8 really depends on your definition of criticising/punishing, but certainly whatever you do, don't be angry about it. We don't discipline for toiletting accidents. Toiletting is now entirely her responsibility. We assist her for aspects she cannot ...


2

There is absolutely nothing wrong with kids lining up cars, crying when things aren't the way they expect them, or being amused/intrigued by the reality of having a physical body. Seriously... try this experiment right now. Set your hand down on the table. Move a single finger up away from the table and concentrate on feeling how the nearby muscles pull ...


2

While on their own, most of the concerns you have are normal for toddlers. However, combined, they suggest he may have some form of Autism. It would probably be a good idea to consult his pediatrician and see about a screening. At 3, he's at a good age to get an accurate result, while still being early enough to have good results from any help/intervention ...


1

I suggest that you explore some fun things she can do inside or near the car. I tried and it worked for me. What I did, I made her familiar with my car (SUV). I let her participate in car wash(just for fun, not actual car wash) I play jingles, cartoon character voices, poems, TV ads in car stereo. I always stop car, after 1 or 2 hours ride, to get some ...


1

Drivers matter; so do the numbers of twists and turns. If she always seems to get sick at around the same time (15 minutes from your parents' house), it might be that it's a particularly winding route that's affecting her. You have a few options. I agree that giving her crackers (high starch, low fat) and a little non-fat liquid (i.e. no milk) before the ...


2

Probably there is no easy solution, but as a person who gets car sick pretty often I would suggest the following: Try different car if possible. Car (and driver) do make a difference. Try driving her often starting from short distances and slowly increasing the distance so she gets used to being in the car Try feeding her bread (or bagel, if available) - ...


2

According to this average height for 13 months old girl is 75.2 cm and average weight is 9.2 kg. So your baby's height seems pretty normal. However, at this age the growth trend is important. Your pediatrician should have a record of height/weight at different ages and compare it to what is considered to be normal.


4

I did a bit of searching on this one and it's particularly challenging because of the "under 2yo". The most common advice I found was to stop and let her out for awhile. (The MayoClinic seemed to have the most well-rounded advice.) The other common advice that related to your particular situation was letting in some air, but I'm guessing you've tried that ...


2

Twenty months is quite young to expect a child to be potty trained. It will happen when he's physiologically and developmentally ready, and there's not a lot you can do to move it forward, and good reasons not to try: frustration and icky messes on your part, tears and shame on his part, and a lot of conflict between you two to no purpose. If it isn't ...


3

I think you should wait a bit. Ideally, your child should come to see you right after soiling his diaper to get it changed. We tried very hard to potty-train my second daughter, but it only worked when she would come see us to get a diaper when she was naked and needed to pee. Before that moment, she wasn't ready. That was at about 30 months old, by the ...



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