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1

You might look into a food intolerance (inability to digest), the most common being lactose intolerance. At this age (over 2) the digestive system is usually running fairly smoothly, as the child has had enough time to build a sufficient population of healthy bacteria. They are not "allergic", since there is no histamine reaction, and so is typically not a ...


3

Short answer - Don't. USB sockets only output 5 volts and 3 amps, well below the line for if it could hurt anyone, including toddlers. There really isn't a need to spend more money on covers which aren't needed, the only concern would be if somehow your child worked out how to short the current on the charger, although this would usually require taking the ...


1

You could always try something like these USB Covers [Amazon].


-1

This may sound like a bad idea but after reading others do it and trying it, it does seem to work. You have them spend time without a diaper and pants (recommend outside now that its warm out). It teaches them the sensation of needing to go, followed by going and being able to actually see pee or poop come out.


9

Since toddlers (and babies) have been (and still are in various other cultures) potty trained this young and younger, apparently without a problem, The missing word here is some - some toddlers have been potty trained this young. Every child is different. Potty training combines two completely different developmental aspects: Physiological - ...


9

It would be problematic in the sense that short circuiting the pins may damage the USB charger. There are no health risks. At worst, the child will be subjected to 5 volts. The resulting 'shock' is not only harmless, it is not even noticable, roughly equivalent to replacing the batteries from the tv remote with your bare hands. If instead of poking the ...


1

Potty training is a different thing for every child. Some train at 18 or 20 months, but most train in the range of 2.5 to 3.5 years old. In order to train, you need two things: the awareness of when you need to go, and the ability and willingness to go on the toilet. The first of these is largely a physical trait; at some point, children learn when ...


4

She's not quite ready. Keep her in a nappy for the next few months. Do keep the potty around and encourage her to sit on it, and get used to it, but keep the nappies on for now. My toddler was the same. We were convinced that by some trick we'd make her understand the peeing thing. She didn't... then one day she just got it. I don't think it was anything we ...


5

The reason for childproofing power sockets is that they can provide dangerous (even lethal) amounts of current and/or voltage. Both US 110V and international 220V are not to be toyed with. In theory you don't need to childproof USB sockets because they only provide 5V. In practice you must check the power rating of those sockets because some USB chargers ...


6

I believe what you are asking about is water intoxication. To answer your question simply, yes, too much water, especially in a very short amount of time, can lower sodium levels for an 11 month old, an 11 year old, or pretty much anyone at any age. Babies younger than 6 months and athletes are the most vulnerable. Symptoms of water intoxication are (to ...


4

As the parent to a withholder (from 6 months to 2.5 years!) you have my sympathy, but I must stress to you that it's vital that you completely back off the pressure right now. She absolutely has to be 100% comfortable pooing first and foremost - and as inconvenient as it is if that is in her pants, THAT is where she needs to poo. Holding poo in can cause ...


2

One anecdote. A good friend of mine was brain surgeon on Boston Children's Hospital. He would go ballistic every time he saw gates at the top of the stairs. The number one reason for brain surgery on small kids that he saw was kids climbing the gate at the top and then falling down the stairs from a high vantage point head first. This was much much more of a ...


6

If you're worried your baby might fall on the stairs, then yes--definitely. Our daughter began climbing things (stairs, bookcases, etc.) at around eight months; we installed a gate at both ends of the stairs, to block them when we were on either floor. Each baby's different, but eventually they will climb. It's all part of learning to walk. It's good to let ...


1

My 1y little girl began climbing the stair when she learnt to crawl. When she learnt to walk, she began going upstairs in a mix of crawling/walking. She can goes all the way up, about 16 steps. When taught her to just climb the first and then sit on it, be it to eat, drink or play with something. She only tries to climb further when someone goes upstairs in ...


2

We did. We have 15 oak stairs and our adventurous son had no compunctions about climbing all the way to the gate at the top and bouncing up and down on it. Save yourself the gray hairs and throw a gate at the bottom. As he gets older and more conversant with his motor skills you can remove it.


1

It's important to distinguish lactose intolerance from dairy allergy. Lactose intolerance occurs when the body loses the ability to digest lactose. Someone with lactose intolerance can consume lactose-free dairy products (including hard cheeses) without trouble; lactose-containing dairy products will cause gastrointestinal upset, but no other problems. On ...


0

We did it this way: once done with bath/shower, we used to put her sitting on the washing machine (where we usually change her). One of us would talk to her, non-stop, and the other one would go about the business of cutting her hair telling her to be still: she was 16 to 24 months old at the time. We used to use very small and non-pointy scissors, to ...


1

We try to approach our transitions as intentionally and with as much advanced planning as possible, because they are tough, as you mentioned. We start with the following strategy: Make our child aware there will be an upcoming transition to do something else (eat, sleep, get in the car, etc), and explain why the next thing is important and what will be ...


0

I use the clippers (buy a fairly good set - like Wahl - as dull clippers hurt!) and have since my kids were ~12 months (both boys). It's pretty easy to do, and pretty quick, and it looks decent as long as you pay some attention to leaving some parts shorter/longer appropriately (I follow the directions that came with the clippers). They sit quietly for me ...


2

For us with an almost-four-year-old, giving a time limit helps. "We can do this for two more minutes, then we're going to do x. Okay?" And get them to acknowledge that, if possible. Then, a "one minute" warning. Then, we ask "Okay, time to do x. What do we have to do to do that?" And encourage them to explain the steps )"Put our shoes on?") Mostly, we just ...


8

The key for us is using a timer. We have a 'strong willed' almost-three year old, and he hates transitions (unless there's a big reward or somesuch). Big tantrums. However, we began around 2 using a timer. "Okay, son, we're about done with X activity. I'm setting a timer for 2 minutes; when it goes off, we're going to go [eat|sleep|do something ...


0

Investigate Vernal Allergic Conjunctivitis. It is more common among boys than girls. I know a lot about it as I spent years arguing with my doctor about my sons eyes. It was stressful for me and debilitating for him! He is now 14 and after suffering for approx 12 years seems to have grown out of it. (Touch wood) These things will help: oral antihistamines ...


4

This definitely depends on the kid. My youngest can go up and down stairs with no problem, and he has been able to since 11 months. He learned how to go down stairs (backwards as otherwise noted here) very quickly - over christmas at Grandma's house, who has a single step up to the raised dining room. Nice short drop to practice on, he went up and down ...


9

At 14 months, most kids can only crawl on the stairs. They will learn walking up much sooner than walking down. What we do/did is to teach the toddler to crawl down with the feet first and belly down - just like you'd climb up, only in reverse. The same technique works for getting off the couch or bed! Toddlers might want to face forward but that ...


5

Stairs were a hard thing on our end too. Your twins are still pretty young. You have to take in account of how long they've been walking. I wouldn't put a beginner skier on a double black diamond until I was sure they wouldn't hit a tree. Our approach was to continually hold our toddler's hand while we walked down, insisting that she hold the rail. If she ...


1

I like Joe's answer, but will contribute a few more, also based on extended empirical studies. Stuff to Bring Lots of Paper and Crayons Buy a few coloring books, connect-the-dots templates, mazes, etc and a lot of spare paper and crayons. If that's one thing to remember, remember that one. May vary from kid to kid though. Also, read this thread with lots ...


3

Suggestions based on my experience: Drive at night. We did several similar length trips (Chicago-DC, Chicago-west of Denver) with a 2.5 year old, and the best luck we had was driving overnight. Leave at 3pm, arrive at 9am, or whatever, kids sleep 80% of the trip. They're happy, you're tired but hopefully have someone to help at the destination. If he's ...


3

Spend one-on-one time with your daughter, as much as you can. Important now, while the sibling is still on his/her way, but critical once he/she gets here. Also, find ways to include her in the day-to-day care of her new sibling. Can she fetch wipes/diapers/bibs? Would she want to help feed, when bottles are appropriate? Maybe she can do some ...


1

Social networks are just another way to relate to others. Educating children into relationships is part of parent´s duties. You should use FB to experience its full capabilities and risks. Mainly you should educate your children to show respect to others, be it in a social network or any other social relation.


1

Based on your edit, it sounds to me like he's just not hungry at 1800. Having a large snack at 1600 might be too close to dinner to be hungry. Try either moving the 1600 snack up to 1500, or the 1800 dinner to 1900. My almost-three year old occasionally eats poorly at dinner but is hungry an hour or so later, and will eat his dinner then (we have a rule, ...


1

This is a procedure we apply (works also for activities other than sex): Make sure toddler is asleep Turn on your wireless baby monitor Do whatever you need in any room (except bedroom), break and check when you hear some noise from monitor.


2

I just plop the t-shirt over their head and let them have fun finding the arm-holes. For pants and shoes, I just lift one of their feet, causing them to instinctively reach for the nearest hand-hold to keep their balance--usually my ear or hair.


2

I'll often sit with my legs crossed, set them in my lap, plop the head through the neck hole, then reach through the sleeves, grab their hands, and pull them through. Then I put their legs in the pants, stand them up while I'm still sitting and pull their pants up the rest of the way, and their shirt down. As they grow I work on having them lift their legs ...


6

Toddler? One word: Smartphone. There is some great advice above, but in an emergency popping Elmo or a basketball game on a phone and handing it to the toddler can be a bailout when they are frustrated. Somewhat counterintuitively it even helps them focus on the hand that's going through a sleeve by having a big phone clenched in the other hand. We're not ...


1

Of course you can just have sex in front of a toddler. If he/she is busy playing or reading or whatever, he wont notice. And if he sees you, you show him a smile to show him, that everything is ok (because it could of course irritate him if he sees you during this event for the very first time). After that smile you just go on. The problem with this method ...


2

My son also received some serious bite marks as a toddler, and he learned to do the same. We made sure to tell him at every given situation that biting is wrong and he must speak up when it happens (daytime caregivers did the same). Thankfully he learned that biting and hitting is never okay, even in defense, and it always works to speak up, to move away ...


33

The words "efficient" and "toddler" don't really go together. Mostly, you just have to accept that things like getting dressed will take a lot longer while they are learning, and plan time in your schedule for it*. There are a few tricks that can make it a little easier, though. Have one parent hold the child still and assist while the other does the ...


7

In my experience, we had stages roughly like this: 12 months: Put arms through sleeves. Prior to this I began by puting shirt over neck, then positioned the hand in the arm hole, and then getting him to move his arm through the sleeve. That moved into him finding the arm holes mostly on his own by 12-15 months. That's probably the single biggest time ...


3

I read the book, however, my kido took almost a fortnight to get used to it. "HOW TO" books do not consider the individual personality types.


5

Biting is tough; my oldest went through a stage at just over a year and it was very difficult to train him out of it. It took around four months to get him to stop; he just didn't understand it was wrong, even with books, 'Ouch, Biting Hurts', giving more attention to the bitee, etc. Biting at three is a bit different, though. A three year old has some ...



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