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Is it possible something could have made her afraid of men? One time, long ago, a woman told me that her daughter was afraid of men as she explained why her daughter would hide behind her mom's leg and peak around at men in a very shy manner. I'm just throwing that out there as a possibility because of what I know somebody else experienced. It may not be ...


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Children tend to go through phases where they strongly favor one parent, which seems to be happening to your daughter. Your daughter wants to maximize time and attention from her mother, that's why she protests if you do things with her that her mother would otherwise do. You're not doing anything wrong or different, you're just not mommy. This phase will ...


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What I have seen, is that when a child attaches to a specific toy or type of toy, it isn't necessarily that they want exactly the face value of the toy. Instead you may want to look at the feelings or ideas behind the toy. Children do not have a lot of life experiences so they do not know how to fully express themselves. On your child attaching to ...


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Agree with swbarnes2. At that age, eating more by day will not help her not be hungry at night. Does it make a difference to you at night whether you ate more by day? No. Because your body was taught to not require feeding in the middle of the night. Children at that age do not need to drink milk in the middle of the night. There will be occasions where your ...


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As other people have pointed out, it's simply too early to tell if this will be your son's passion in life. But that doesn't mean you shouldn't support it and nurture his interest. As a toddler, the best way to do this is to gradually expose him to a wider variety of construction vehicles, and provide increasingly detailed contexts in which they're used. ...


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My kid is similar. I sometime wonder if he think these are all wild animals that we are able to domesticate. There's no guarantee that this will be his passion in life since later he will learn more complex things. We gave him small toys for this purpose but we don't exaggerate. I took the opportunity to teach him a lot of things using his trucks. He ...


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Children often enjoy playing with vehicles! Have wheels, which makes them easy to move around on the floor. Construction vehicles often have moving parts that are easy to manipulate at their age. Then, real construction vehicles are huge. To a toddler, they're absolutely massive. They can do things that humans and animals can't do. This can be rather awe-...


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Who really knows what goes on in a toddler's mind? Maybe he will be a construction worker, but if a toddler's favorite toys are any indication, he will not. It's most likely a phase he's going through now. How to nurture him now, though, is easy enough. The library should have lots of children's books with construction vehicles; check some out and read ...


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My nephew use to bit my daughter really bad for stupid things or when he had a tantrum. One day he almost killed her with iron bar, luckily my mum had time to stop his attack. His mum didn't said anything about his behave and never bothered, then, I had to stand up. I called him in private and said how much I loved my daughter and also him, but if he touch ...


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This sounds like it was a traumatic experience for you as well. Children are more resilient then parents and your daughter should recover from the scary experience quickly. It is important to try and focus on keeping your self calm. If you can, take the day off work. If not remember that you can persevere through a short period of poor rest. Try to get back ...


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If you should or should not let her cry it out is completely up to you (obviously). There is a lot of research on crying out loud, most of what I hear lately tells that crying out loud is harmfull ( https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/moral-landscapes/201112/dangers-crying-it-out ) Ofcourse a lot of people tell something different, but my opinion (personal ...


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At age 2, she almost certainly doesn't need the calories to get through the night. Most babies reach that point at about 6 months. She needs to learn how to soothe herself to sleep, and you need to give her the opportunity to learn.


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surprised this answer is not yet prevalent: Why is not a question. It is an interrogative. The issue of an incessant 'why' affect is based in self-identity and the basic interprets of language.(Ones grammar*, dershiwitz Harvard) simple solution is to be exemplar of the posture that: Language is plastic and fluid; the definitions of 'fact' and/or ...


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It is quite difficult to get a full picture from the brief outline you've provided, as you're not sharing what it is exactly that didn't work in your old approach, and what the problem is you're facing now. Is the child behind in language development? Is the child using one language more than the other? Is the child mixing their languages? Or..? In general, ...


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First thing to do that the dog must to be on a lead so under complete control, parents should stroke and interact with the dog by taking with the child at a save distance with the other parent. The dog owner can start to demonstrate regarding how obedient the dog is by getting it to sit or down or fetch. Using toys and food with the dog will help to get the ...


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We had the exact same situation except that the age gap was wider between the first two - 20 months instead of 10. We just let her be first most of the time and she soon came to see her slightly younger brother as a good play companion. As she got older, she got better about being less insistent on being first all the time, as long as her overall social ...


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In such situations you can try to duplicate the "getting first" into two similar things, one for her and one for her brother, and then ask her which one she prefers. For example, does she prefer to get in the bath first, or does she prefer to get her hair dried first. Does she prefer to get the breakfast cereal first or get the milk on the cereal first. If ...


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The "terrible 2's" is when children discover their emotions, and this sort of behaviour is very typical. Helping the child to recognize and identify their own emotions is key in this stage. If you can sit them down, talk to them, ask them how they feel and why they feel that way, it can help a lot. For example: "How do you feel right now - do you feel ...


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Frustration in a 2 year old is common. As your child improves its ability to express itself, the outbursts should end. Emotions are difficult for a 2 year old to handle. Focus on modeling patient behavior. When your child starts to overreact, calm your self, by taking a few deep breaths, before you engage with your child. Be assertive and direct with you ...


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You're right that inducing vomiting often is not healthy; I wouldn't worry much about nutrition, but the lining of the esophagus and throat weren't meant to be often subjected to the acidic contents of the stomach; also, there are occasionally consequences elsewhere. However, some things to consider: This will pass; it's a new superpower he's discovered ...


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I suspect it is just another phase of growing up for your son. I say this because our son did exactly the same thing - started out happy and curious about dogs and (suddenly without any cause - we have never had a dog) got scared of them - to the point of screaming and wanting to be picked up when there were any around. At one point he shouted and screamed ...


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Your son is very young and has gone from very friendly to fearful in a short time. This more than likely has something to do with the family reaction to the devastating loss of your pet/ family member. Regardless of the cause of the behavior change the best plan to overcome his newfound fear/ irritation is the simplest: pick him up when he runs to you and ...


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You can buy him a toy puppy and let him get used to it. He probably saw the dead dog in front of him and his brain associated it's death with "danger". Seeing a dead animal can be pretty scary experience especially as a child. I myself have experienced this fear when I was a child. A dead tiger was found near the town and was brought to the wildlife ...


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Don't give up on having a dog; your son's fear is likely transitory, and there are ways you can help him overcome them. But it will take time and patience. I'm sure there are a number of ways to do this. Here is what I would recommend. Is he able to express yet why he's afraid of dogs? When he is, that will be a help, although he may not be able to ...


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Children do learn to modify their behaviour with different people, so its possible you can teach him to behave around you even if he still acts up for his grandparents. Try getting down to his level, insist that he makes eye contact, and say "I know you are upset about this. Thats fine. But screaming about it is not acceptable. If you carry on screaming you ...


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If it happens a lot it is abusive. For now if it is going on a lot. Keep him away more often from his cousins and then we he is about four, get him into self defense and also look on the internet like youtube for some kid self defense but make sure he does not learn something that can seriously injure another child. For now you perhaps should keep him away ...


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Warning: Do not force a child to eat something. - It results in them learning to really hate that food. http://www.raisehealthyeaters.com/2012/07/what-forcing-kids-to-eat-looks-like-20-years-later/ Your question about when: I have been listening to this audio book, First Bite by Bee Wilson - https://www.amazon.com/First-Bite-How-Learn-Eat/dp/0465064981 and ...


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I have two kids... the older one is 3, the younger one is almost 2. They started attending the same day care a few months ago, and like your kids, they are in separate classes. So while I haven't been in your shoes exactly, I can certainly empathize with your situation. Here's what I would recommend... In the mornings, drop your older daughter off first. ...


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First off, please don't worry! This is natural at this age and all children are like this in toddlerhood. My son, who is now 4, did the same thing with our cat at that age, and now he is very gentle and wonderful with cats. (My one year old has now entered that stage; our cat has passed, but she pulls on my 4 year old's hair and she finds it hilarious.) ...


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My son developed a sense of independence at around the same age. Our pediatrician told us it was normal. He rarely cries when he's frustrated, but the frustration clearly shows on his face. My strategy is to praise him for his efforts. When I help him, I try to guide him with broadly applicable advice. For example, when he tries to force Duplo blocks ...


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You need to not take care of the baby 24/7. That is NOT your job. If you spouse work, and you don't, it is your job to take care of the baby while he is not there (so maybe 10 hours a day?). When you both are home the baby is taken care of by both of you! It also sounds like you are unable to relax with your in-laws around. I sounds like the best way to ...


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I would say from your post that your toddler demonstrates a very strong sense of independence. This can actually kick in at various ages, but toddlers do typically want independence once they can move independently. This independence can be of varying levels, but your toddler obviously has an urge to solve problems himself, and if you solve them he is ...


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You could spend a large part of each day with your infant strapped to your back while you pursue any one of hundreds of activities. I have seen young women with a baby in a front or back sling happily throwing pots, pruning plants, baking bread, hiking, shopping, and so forth. You could hand out flyers at the mall. Sacagawea Charbonneau explored a quarter ...


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I work in a school and the way we deal with this type of behaviour is to remind the child that they must use "kind hands" when playing with their friends. We set clear rules that if "kind hands" aren't used the child will then be removed from playing with their friend for 5 minutes and have to sit in silence away from everyone. Then they are introduced back ...


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Give the kid to the mother in law for a couple of hours per day, getting out of the house if necessary for some alone time. However, you will have to live with the mother in law taking care of the kid her way during those hours.


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Would part-time child care be an option? Even if its just a few hours a week, it would give you time to get away from the house, your baby and your mother-in-law. Also, if you can find something that involves getting out of the house on a regular basis, like a class, then you could rope your MIL in as a baby-sitter.


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Your baby is a hobby! Your beautiful child is a commitment. At 15 months, you've been through the infant stage, one of the tougher ones. Your child is around the point where he'll/she'll be walking. This is the fun part! You're almost at the point where you can take your baby to the park. He'll want to take little walks outside, or get pushed in a buggy. ...


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I 100% agree with all the posts above! A couple of things to add. First, I'm not going to advise regarding your disatisfaction with your mother-in-law because that's, like, a whole different issue. Second, it sounds like there's some stuff going on under the surface. Like, the lack of a hobby is a symptom of a larger issue at play. I don't play a therapist ...



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