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1

In addition to Erica's detailed and excellent answer, a few notes for how we handle this (in a similar situation). Most of our meals are planned around our schedules. We have nights that one of us is home a bit earlier, and nights one of us will be home later (or both). On nights that we can be home a bit earlier, we plan dinners that might take a bit of ...


6

We've got two working adults and three kids — we're very familiar with the scheduling challenges this causes. (Once your daughter starts having extracurricular activities, things will only get more hectic!) First off, if you want the whole family to be eating the same meal at the same time, a snack on the way home for your daughter is pretty critical to ...


3

How about giving her a small amount of food that doesn't need preperation as soon as she gets home? Enough food for her to be less hungry, but not that much that she's really full? That way you or your husband can prepare the main dish as soon as you're home, and she can eat with you? Or ask the daycare if it is possible to give her some fruit between ...


-1

My husband and I are going through the EXACT same thing. To a T. For a very long time our 2 & 3 year olds slept like angels! We might have had to put them back to bed 1 time, but mostly they went right to bed without an ounce of hassle. For the past month or so our 2 (almost 3) year old will NOT go to bed. We put him down, say prayer, daddy leaves the ...


8

Ask yourself: How do children experience their world? Most languages have words like "grasp", that mean to understand something and to touch it. Good schools/educators try to incorporate as many sensory channels and as many different ways to teach as possible. In my child's primary school letters and numbers are taught by having the children walk the ...


2

Although "nobody likes a snitch", there's a line between "looking for help" vs "snitching". I would avdise to keep on going for the idea "Hitting is bad" cause it definitely is, and teaching your child that when he feels like someone's doing bad things to him, it's more than OK to report to an adult. The adult might then take action, was it simply ...


1

I think this totally depends on your vision about how to raise children, it seems impossible for us to answer to me. Note that having to cure your kid when it gets ill isn't always the best option. What I mean is: If your kid gets serious ill and neets antibiotics, it will cure him (which is good), but the antibiotics kill the "good germs" in the intestines ...


0

While I agree with the approaches of the other answers in the long term, two years old is very young for that kind of subtle discernment of a situation. At that age, kids need very simple instructions, and asking for an adult's help is the most effective. That adult can show in the moment the appropriate response, taking the unique circumstances into ...


4

Sometimes children up to a certain age need a "hands-on" approach to their misbehaviour. Let me tell you what happened to both my children, especially to my daughter: We have a clear "no hitting" policy in the family and two verbally competent children who up to this day can yell at each other like a bunch of fishwives but don't retort to physical ...


2

As the mom of 2 'energetic' boys, here is my take: escalation doesn't work, and all it teaches is that 'might is right'. My kids are sometimes the 'instigator' and sometimes the 'victim', and in either direction it doesn't work. If you hit back, a 'rough' child might think you want to fight for fun, or might be even more aggressive. Especially at 2, I ...


2

With our three year old son, anytime he used to hit his sibling or someone, we would demonstrate a Shakespearean style stage drama full of intense agony and pain and callout to him letting him know how much it hurts us when he hurts his sibling. Apparently toddlers care a lot about their folks and are genuinely concerned to help them put a magic bandaid ...


-1

Perhaps unconventional in the US, but my mother-in-law put something bitter (like neem) on her nipple. Her children felt betrayed for a little while, but lost their appetite for breastmilk.


3

Breastfeeding is very good for children. According to the World Health Organisation, the average age, worldwide, at which children stop breastfeeding is 4.7 years. So it is not unhealthy for children to still be breastfeeding at 3 years: she's not even near the average. Having said that, if you want to move her away from breastfeeding, try to introduce ...


4

My wife just started the process. We had some problem to put my son to sleep: he would fall asleep only sucking, and wake up couple of times during night for milk. One day my wife was away and I had to put him to sleep alone... Took me 1 hour, so I decided we had to stop. It's been quite easy actually: the first night it took again a good hour and he cried ...


19

My wife stopped breastfeeding when our daughter was 3. She did it by repeating often the whole month before she turned 3 that when she will be 3, she will be older, and that she will stop breastfeeding. Bigger childs don't drink breast milk, that's part of the growing-up process, at by the time our daughter was 3, she perfectly understood that. Actually, for ...


2

It depends on what you mean by constantly, and the exact height, the firmness of the bed, position of the child on landing, etc. Fundamentally, the most problematic thing is happening in her head. A man falling 30 feet hitting a concrete abutment will die of internal injuries, because while the outside of his body stops suddenly, the contents of the body ...


1

Since I can see it in her eyes that she wants to communicate but is not able to and I can see it bothering her a lot. One of the Amerind languages was reputed to be so hard that native children weren't fluently competent until about age 8. It is possible that if a child needs to speak 4 languages, it will take longer before they reach competency in all ...


1

Sounds like my daughter at that age, who's now 5 years old. In my daughter's case, it was here moro reflex that caused her to avoid sitting. Basically, the moving backward made her feel like she was in a backward free fall. Try this: lean her back into the chair very slowly, with her head and back supported by your hand. If that doesn't work then ...


0

Children often like to take control of their eating, and refusing is a form of control. It's easy for parents who who have been feeding their children for months to get into battles about eating, which is frustrating for both sides. It's not a reflection on you as a parent, you are trying very hard to make sure he has good nutrition like any good mother ...


2

Dr David Ludwig and Dr Walter Willet published a 2013 opinion column in JAMA Pediatrics that questioned the value of recommending low-fat or skim milk for children. While much of the article is behind a paywall, I did find a discussion of the opinion column (and it was also discussed on Time). Ludwig and Willett argued in their paper that children who ...


0

This could probably be a question from your pediatrician but I could say that we gave our kids whole milk until they were about 2 then switched them to 2%. Our boys have no problem gaining weight though. In fact they are a little on the chubby side. If weight gain is your goal then I would stay with whole milk for a little longer.


1

My suggestion would be to make those experiences more pleasant for him. He has probably had a bad experience (shots will do that to a kid). You can try taking him to those places and do nothing but happy things. He will start to associate those places better than he did before. It also depends on the doctor. If you have a pediatrician that is great with ...


4

My 27 month old makes me think I'm losing my hearing sometimes, between his higher-pitched (and thus less easily understood) voice, and his obviously imperfect enunciation. I'm totally with you on this one. What I do is try to avoid saying "what", or other "I didn't understand you" type phrases. They are understandably frustrating. I know a family member ...


0

The best way to keep kids engage is by aking them to play with old fashioned toys- like blocks, and balls. Fingerpaints is another option and you can even use some shaving cream. Even you can make them to sing and dance. I use to do with my Lo. We sing together and dance. Here are few activities like contact paper crafts:If you remove the backing and tape ...


2

This is common among the toddlers. Even if it is complex idea, then also they will try to communicate it with the words they know and for the first time they will express it with more patience and excitement. If we ask them to repeat it again, then they will feel like frustrated and embarrassed, so don't try to ask them twice instead give them a smile for ...


3

I lived in England when my kids were little. The sidewalks were narrow and often crowded. I had 4 kids......I used a harness because that was common there and made sense. Now that we know more about the human brain and that it isn't developed until it is at least 25 yrs old, I think making a kid wear one makes even more sense. Americans were the only ones ...


0

This is adapted from an answer to another question: 2,5 year old girl always picks black Specifically, the linked source in that answer, Why Johnny Can't Name His Colors, mentions prenominal versus postnominal use of colors. This set me on track to this research article, Surprise in the Learning of Color Words (PDF). The research suggests that using ...


1

Is this normal? Yes, it is. One of my kids is like that; everything is "red". When asked to match colors, though, she can. What I did was show her colour swatches and asked her to show me things that were the same colour. If I showed her the yellow swatch and asked her to show me something that was the same colour, she picked my yellow sweater. This ...


5

I hate to break it to you, but you're probably going to have to figure it out on your own, or with the help of an occupational therapist. My daughter has cerebral palsy and often gets loud and bothersome as you describe, but the things we have learned that calm her don't work at all for my nephews with down syndrome or autism, or even other children with ...


0

When I was young my mum dealt with this by buying some batteries, torch bulbs, switches, bits of wire etc and taught me how electricity works. I had lots of books on electricity. I understood that mains was dangerous, but I didn't need to play around with it because I could do the same stuff with wires and batteries. Plus it was incredibly educational.


0

The best way to keep you toddler engage by making to do few activities 1) Play Dough is one of the best activity for little one were they can make creative things with that. 2) Paint in bags Place a paint in a ziploc bag and seal the bag then paste it or tape on a window and let you kid move the paint with the fingers. 3) Set them pack and play and put ...


1

Lots of good answers to the clothing part, but I would like to add some additional stuff about the 'wailing until someone does it' part. 18 months, for both my kids, were the start of their independence and really attempting to communicate. She has discovered a desire or need (to take her clothes off) and a way to communicate it (wailing). It may only ...


0

My daughter started with shoes and socks being removed at 4 months and would throw them out of the car window or out of her stroller or in the supermarket...didn't matter; she clearly didn't want shoes and socks. I found open-toed sandals for her age that she actually will wear almost all of the time. However, now at 18 months she is the epitome of "run ...


0

Changing baby holding positions is not the only thing you can do to reduce the back pain you are experiencing. I would also recommend trying to strengthen your back and abdominal muscles. The easiest way to do this is by doing sit-ups. You can get information about appropriate exercise regimens from any of many sources: a physician, a personal trainer, ...


-1

I have always sworn mild to moderate...I was going to really stop. But they grew smarter than I realized and at some 3 to 5 years old they probably threw a few words out...I made no comment. When it seemed like they could understand , I explained maybe 10 times each that they were not invited to speak like that until they were 18. I went on to tell them ...


-1

I'm 6 wks pregnant and my 6,5, and 4 yr old told me the same thing.. they told me I was pregnant and and I took a test came out negative then I went to the doctor took a blood test came out positive. Children can just tell you things before you know them. My 4 yr old is cranky


3

This sort of thing isn't limited to separated parents. My oldest (who's 3.5) is very similar, but with "daycare" in place of the other parent. He naps consistently every day at 12:30 on the nose for 3 hours at daycare (or until recently did; I think that time is going down a bit now that he's older). Best napper they've ever seen - and has since he was a ...


3

Children like routine. A framework allows them to feels safe and then start to explore the world and their place in it. People need routine for good sleep. People who have problems with sleep need to start quite a rigid routine and stick to it. So, try that first. You and your ex should try to agree a routine that you both try to stick to. This will ...


1

Well, I am a Pakistani and I am a bilingual. My mother taught me both languages as I was a toddler, but she mostly used Urdu (which is extremely similar to Hindi) at home. She did teach me English words but those that I could relate to or those which a child finds at home. You should take it very gently, teaching her English words gradually but do not speak ...


3

Is there a reason you cannot combine the two approaches? It sounds like your ultimate goal is to raise a happy, well-adjusted child who can interact with many different people in different situations (to which I say YAY). In this case, especially considering you're dealing with a 2-year-old, I'd suggest trying to bridge the gap between your two scenarios. ...


0

It they are ok with the crib bed set so there is no need of a pillow for the kids under 2. It will be suffocation for the kids while using it. If you would like to use the pillow for the LO so you need to wait till they move from the crib to bed. orelse you can use a small pillow while he is still using the crib. So you have to be aware that you should be ...


0

Firstly, she is only 2 years old, so I personally think you should let her learn the language she is comfortable with. Because kids under 5 years can learn 3-4 languages effortlessly. Or Alternatively, you could send her to child care centre where they speak only English. At some stage kids generally learn the native language fluently as they grow. If ...


5

I haven't been able to find anything remotely official (e.g. NIH study), but found this so far: John Pearce and Jane Bidder, authors of "Baby and Toddler Sleep Program: How to Get Your Child to Sleep," warn parents to wait as long as possible to introduce a pillow, preferably until a toddler reaches 18 months of age or later. (src) The main reason to ...


1

The obvious ones which sometimes work: books sorters puzzles counting things a bowl of water and containers (outdoors and on warm/hot days only)



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