New answers tagged

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At his age, it is totally normal even if he has been dry at night for a while. It isn't even a diagnosible medical condition until he is 6. The technical term (if he were older) is secondary eneuresis. This is often caused by stresses in the child's life, like a change in schedule, or a new member of the family. The first rule is to not get upset at him. ...


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Seems to me that the healthiest thing is to essentially ignore it, maybe just asking him to help clean up. I suppose it can only become big issue if you pay a lot of attention to it...


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Crib time is just as important as socialization. Isolated playtime allows 5 month to 16 month old children time for their own thoughts. Learning to entertain themselves is necessary for learning how to play. Private playtime teaches them independence. Babies need to know that they are separate individuals from others. Make sure the toys are age ...


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Could be from the child being shamed, caregivers being really negative about changing dirty diapers.


1

It doesn't seem something to lose your sleep over, however: A) Psychologists make a big deal about how people's ability to 'try new stuff', be open to change, etc, is useful in life. Your degree of openness to change is one of the "big 5" personality traits. B) If you want her to eat something else, you have to stop feeding her what you don't want her to ...


5

Of course she doesn't eat. First she gets to make a mess (what fun) and play with putting things on food like salt (something a 2 year old doesn't need extra of). And when shes done she gets her very own special dish of cheese (something that's not particularly good for her). There is zero incentive to eat real food here. What about only offering her a ...


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I have five kids, and we have found this book invaluable: "Health Sleep Habits, Happy Child" by Marc Weissbluth (on Amazon: http://amzn.to/1WdggMU). This has been invaluable for us in understanding our children's sleep rhythms, with practical advice on how to make it work for a variety of age groups. I would ask your child's doctor about sleep, and see if ...


4

At that age you can have a good play mat or floor surface and have toys on the floor. A baby that age doesn't want to be cooped up in a bouncer/exersaucer-like thing.


4

Your youngster is likely to be crawling/walking soon if not already. She will need to develop the appropriate musculature and balance. Some parents switch to a baby play pen at this point, and others baby-proof their homes and let their kid have at it. Either way, be sure to lock your doors with bolts at this age, as my son in particular always wanted to ...


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No, it's unlikely to be worth it from a health perspective. There's essentially no evidence that organic food is any "better" (or worse) for you, and the jury is still out for the effects of DHA: while there are some studies indicating it might slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease or inhibit growth of colon cancer, neither is likely to be a ...


2

I think the answers so far are not reading the question. It's not about moving on from nappies, but how to stop the nappy pant leaking. I would look at different brands. The cut and size can make a difference. The clothing worn make a a difference too. Trousers will keep the pants in place. With a good waterproof mattress protectors it needn't be a big ...


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You should treat this question the same as you would treat any other questions that your child asks you, which is to answer them truthfully and in as much detail as they are interested in. They may not be able to comprehend everything ('cell' seems to be a difficult concept IME), but it is possible to find analogies that help them understand. For example ...


3

Children often are not looking for long, drawn out, "THE TALK" kind of answers to these questions. It's important to not lie (the stork put it there!) because that does nothing for their educational development, but it IS important to keep it age appropriate for understanding, and usually as brief as possible. My suggestion would be to find some age ...


5

You are already giving it more importance than it has by calling it The Talk. It's such a big deal to you (and many more parents) just because you want it to be so. Treating sexuality as something Top Secret or Super Important while it is just another thing, it's a mistake as, what will happen in the future to your kids, is the same happening to you right ...


3

First of all, congratulations for your success with EC so far. My son started potty training around 32 months, which seems to be very close to average (girls tend to be a bit quicker), so you've made tremendous progress despite the current situation. This sounds like a typical example of the "two steps forward, one step back" pattern in your child's ...


1

First, try to figure out the feelings going on that are resulting in aggressive behavior. Work on resolving that and you will go a long way to solving the issue of biting. Second, when you're in the moment and need an immediate solution, place all the focus on what you do want instead of what you don't want. So "give me a hug (or kiss)" or "give each ...


0

Well, we've tried something new: When they're about to bite, we tell them to stop and to make a kiss instead. It seems to work pretty well, we'll see how this goes.


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Its very easy actually. When your kid hurt herself, like falling, bumping table etc. You just say auw auw. Do it everytime. Then next time when she hurts you or someone else, you say the same. Soon she will understand the relation of auw auw and pain. At some point when she hurts herself she will also say auw auw.


2

We use a 'double check'. Sometimes he doesn't understand what it actually means when he says yes/no, so I confirm what he meant by explaining what will happen next. Example: Me: Are you done with your dinner? Toddler: Yes! Me: Ok, then I am going to take your food away (or even better: Can I eat your food? This really drives home that he is not having ...


2

Our son began having a hard time with naps at that time too. Most behavioral issues for children can also be traced back to sleep habits, and usually they are a result of not having enough sleep. What we found through reading and experimentation is that a few more things were happening than just a rough nap time: Separation Anxiety. Leading up to the 18 ...


-1

You can use waffle-knit breathable blankets that don't allow a child to suffocate. Such as these: http://www.amazon.com/Gerber-2-Pack-Thermal-Blanket-Discontinued/dp/B001P307EK I wouldn't use an actual quilt until my child was in a large enough bed, probably at age 3-4.


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I made a natural Xanthan Gum hair gel, 1 tablespoons Xanthan gum to 4 oz water. Mix it in a jar, stays good it the fridge for a couple weeks.



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