New answers tagged

0

Don't you feel an urge to sometime "tightly hug" people you truly love? About the "eating" phrase. My mother said that to me and my sister a lot, even after passing the baby years, so there's no need to worry about cannibalism ;)


2

Generally speaking, a child becomes a toddler at around 1 year. This is around the time when they start walking. About the mattress, keep it on the firm side as long as it isn't impacting their sleep. If you do think it is impacting sleep you might still want to wait to turn it over. The firmer side helps prevent SIDS by keeping it easy both for babies that ...


0

I've said the same thing about my son and I'm his father. Will I actually cannibalize him? No. But I will rub against him or kiss him or hug him. He's a baby, he is cute, of course I want to get as close to him as possible. Perhaps it's an evolutionary response to a small child so that the parents will look after him/her and will not be abandoned. ...


1

point out to your son that the iris of the eye is a lens. get a magnifying glass. point out to your son that the magnifying glass is a lens. take your son out on a sunny day. use the magnifying glass to focus the sun light onto some flammable material like some paper. State the obvious that the focal point in the back of the eye will react the same as ...


5

For one, I'd get a plastic mat you can put under the high chair, you can always carry that later to the bathtub and clean it off. I don't think it's going to be too hard to get him to eat at the table. If he throws a fit, or tosses his food away, he's clearly not hungry enough...yet. When he's hungry enough, he's going to eat! Don't give in and take him ...


3

I have 5 year old triplet girls. Each and every one of them experienced what you are describing (night terrors) off & on since at least 18 months of age. All of their 'terrors' were deep & frightening, just terrible to work through and I always thought it was something a person just had to outgrow. HOWEVER, my husband did a lot of investigation and ...


2

Great methods are by showing it in a practical manner. Showing how a magnifying glass can harness the sun's power, or you can explain how everything we look at is reflecting light from the sun, and thus has been weakened in strength and doesn't hurt our eyes. But say you take a mirror which reflects almost all the light, that will hurt our eyes. After you ...


4

Use it as an opportunity to teach moderation. Your child probably knows that being warm feels nice, but too much warmth can be uncomfortable, and even more can burn. A cool breeze is nice too, but too much and we get cold, and can even get hurt. It's the same with light from the Sun, we like having enough so we can see, but too much and it can hurt us. ...


7

There's no way to know when a child will be a particular height, of course, other than waiting. However, you can look at growth charts to see how children typically grow. There are two major sets that I'm aware of; the CDC growth charts and the WHO growth standards (I link to the CDC's page on the WHO growth charts, as I find it easier to navigate; they ...


1

My daughter has been bitten a couple of times, including once in the playground while waiting behind a boy to go off the slide. (I include this example to show the problem (and thus solution) are not limited to the kindergarten.) I felt that the best solution would be if my daughter learned to stand up for herself a little better and in particular how to ...


2

Take a black piece of wood (or something similar, black metal will also do) outside with your son. Then stay for a short time in the sun. Let him touch the piece of wood (be careful if using metal, this can get too hot to touch). It should have gotten really warm. Now let your son look in a mirror and ask him what color his pupils have. Now he should have ...


1

Perhaps she is getting her molars? Our daughter had those nightly terrors when she was around 13 months. The only thing that calmed her down was chewing on bread / toast. During daytime we just noticed a higher flow of saliva...


6

Take a bit of toilet paper, and hold it under the bath's faucet. Turn on the faucet just slightly, so there are small drips. See that? The paper holds. Now turn the faucet on full blast. Does the paper hold up? Nope. Intensity can be damaging/harmful. An example could be made by making a soft touch with one finger, or allowing a whole hand to fall ...


5

Like other respondents, I think you should tell your son that the inside of your eyes can burn, just the same as your skin can, but quicker. But because your skin is on the outside of your body, it has lots of pain sensors to detect when things could damage it. The inside of your eyes don't have pain sensors because they're inside your body where they ...


43

I like the answer from @user20775 discussing a sunburn. To get a more visceral reaction, you could show him how a magnifying glass can burn things by "bunching up" (focusing) the sunlight. That should show him that the sunlight really is a destructive force.


20

The answer is not convincing because it is not true. Tell the child the truth: that we can see because our eyes are sensitive to light, like our body is sensitive to touch – and like too much touch (a hit, actually) may cut our skin or break our bone, too much light may burn our eyes' interior. Atoms or EM radiation are irrelevant now, but it's important to ...


0

No, until 36 months there is everything normal as long as the child understands everything. This can be tested by commanding him. Understanding may come long before producing, and if it takes so long, he will eventually start speaking nearly perfect grammar. On the other hand, commanding is difficult when he cannot walk as you usually test with things like ...


1

It depends more on the individual dog and child than the dog's breed. With that said, I'd recommend a large breed dog. Because they're so big, most large breeds have been selected for extremely gentle behaviour, while smaller breeds can sometimes be overly dominant, defensive and/or aggressive. A nippy chihuahua may not be a big deal for an adult, but a ...


1

A kid is considered language-delayed if they have no words by 18 months, so he's not delayed yet in that area. His gross motor, on the other hand, is delayed. Has he been assessed for that? If he does fall behind in language, you'll be glad to know that he shows a good chance of catching up. Kids who have good receptive language (ability to understand ...


31

Tell him the truth, no weird contradictions. Mr Sun does not shoot something invisible, because obviously you can see light. Furthermore, it is not made of atoms (at least not in physical sense, of course, in some philosophical sense, it is). Just mention that the Sun emits very very much light, and too much light hurts. This is the way it is, although it ...


58

My answer for a four year old girl: "You know how your skin gets burnt in the sun? You know your eye is very soft? The inside is even softer and gets burnt very quickly. Pretty much straight away."


1

Do you put your daughter to sleep with the light switched off or on? If she hasn't got a problem with her day time naps maybe she associates night time with something she does not like. I would try experimenting with light. Maybe try leaving it on until she falls asleep and try to put her to bed like you do during the day. Also as mentioned above, maybe ...


0

Try adding lavender spray and bath soap. It helps, when you make it part of you routine. Also, if you have access to Welch's passion flavored drink. It works wonders and it taste good. Take care, you will fall asleep too


0

My Son has had white or grey hair in his coal black hair since he was three. He is now twenty and still has salt and pepper hair. My Aunt said we have a recessive gene. She said we are prone to have an albino child in our genetics. If that if how you phrase that. Other than that he is handsome blue eyed tall and everything a young man his age should be.


1

The best advice I've heard is the controlled crying technique. The essence is that you leave the baby to cry for a five minutes or so, go back in, briefly reassure the baby, and repeat. Its tough for the parents, but often works.


1

My report is similar to user20744's answer. We moved from spanish-speaking Argentina to english-speaking Canada when our daughters were 3.9 and 1.7 years old. While in Canada, we moved three times in the first 5 months. Completely painless to them, even with the 24+ hour trip and the inability to communicate with other kids for the first few months until ...


1

The schedule sounds OK, although it's more sleep than my son would have managed at that age, I know that some children do sleep more. The problem seems to me like a combination of not being quite tired enough at bedtime and possibly too many negative associations with her crib and bedtime. I think this can be a tricky age as it's around the time that many ...


2

We did this some years ago. As far as our son was concerned it was all an excellent adventure. He was too young to be sad about losing friends, and the airplane and airport were exciting and interesting. If you are flying then read the fine print on luggage allowances carefully. We were able to bring a full size suitcase and hand baggage as "his" luggage, ...


4

We also went through it with our kids, several times. Our first international move, from the U.S. to Peru, was when our oldest was 3.5 and our second had just turned 2. Then we moved from Peru back to the U.S. four years later, with a third child who'd been born in Peru and was just shy of 2 years old at the time of the move. In the 11 years since, we've ...


13

TL; DR: We've been through the same thing, and we tried to explain to my daughter what was going to happen ahead of time, without hiding anything. Overall, it was a painless process, and after a month in the new flat, she seems to have adapted to her new environment. We went through exactly the same situation a few months ago with my 2.5 year old daughter. ...


1

Although stressful for a parent, this is very common, and most likely nothing to be concerned about. It will likely pass as the child gets older. When it happens the best thing may simply be to sit beside the child for a while and gently stroke her shoulder or back until she calms down. Lifting the child to try to console her can sometimes make things ...


1

I found an interesting article about speech development, but it doesn't address your question, so I can only answer with anecdotal evidence. There are people who can stick their pinkie fingers in either side of their mouth and make a high-pitched whistle. Many of us learn the more common form of folding our tongues up and blowing sound out through pursed ...


1

Yes, it's just a toy, however I also think the way the play with toys can sometimes be an indicator of how they'll play with other children or animals. We ask our children to play carefully and respectfully with their toys. With their stuffed animals, we ask them to treat them gently, as if they were real animals. I don't think there is anything wrong with ...


-1

Braid her fringe to the side. Wait until it gets long enought to put behind ear.


0

While i agree with most of the other answers (i.e. there are few if any objective arguments against immunizing) i think it would be more fair to stress the possible conflict between public health which is improved by immunisation programs, and individual risk. For example the Rubella virus is dangerous for pregnant women and unborns. Immunising girls ...


1

I understand why you're anxious about this. It can be really alarming to think of something "stuck" in your three-year-old child's mouth with nothing you can do to get it out. He has realized this too! The problem wasn't really a problem until you accidentally made it into one. Our rule is that when he starts pocketing food, we don't make him eat ...


2

Firstly, if you're going to a specialist clinic I would assume that they are going to give far better and tailored advice that "the internet" will be able to, especially from the few details you give in the question. I think the main problem might be that he (very understandably) prefers breastfeeding to solid food! Now, obviously you cannot control your ...


-3

No, that is not "normal". It may be that nothing deadly wrong is happening, but you really should listen to your kids cry, because they mean something -- even if it is not something you would care about.


0

I really feel for you as have been through the same thing, my son is now 21 and still picky, (sorry) but he has two older sisters and one younger brogher of 12 years, the two older ones never had a problem with them but when their brother came along wow was he different, when he had breakfast, just toddling, he would keep it in his mouth all day, not swallow ...


0

I remember even in jr. high I wanted to go to school in shorts when it was winter.. Maybe ask them to try their decision first and see if it suits the weather outside ( couple min break to go step outside and see if they feel terrible ). Maybe get their critical thinking going instead of what they feel like wearing without context. Depending on how young ...


4

By the way, my son's phase passed very quickly and I'll tell everyone what worked for us. We made him a little photo album filled with about 20 pictures of all his favorite people and a little rhyme on each page. He loved to look at it and had to keep his eyes open to do so, and to tell him classmates and teachers about who is in the book. It was gold! This ...


1

Odds are it's as Dariusz says, just delaying bedtime. But, do consider the possibility that he's constipated, also. Our two year old (who's completely potty trained now) has this happen periodically, where he says he needs to poop, then tries, can't, then does it again twenty minutes later. Typically it's because he's a bit constipated (as he tends to ...


5

At some point, children start doing everything they can come up with in order to stay out of bed the longest they can. Drink, eat, hug, pee, poo, light, change diaper - that was our daughter's list. She requested all those things in random order every evening; sometimes we complied, sometimes not - until we said enough. There is only one thing to do: you ...


5

Unless your 3 year old is hocking the stuff on ebay, "stealing" is the wrong word to use. A 3 year old may take stuff to play with it, or hide it, but the child is most certainly not "stealing". Don't confuse this with adult behaviour. It is completely unrelated. I would simply try to point out to the child that this habit of hiding things, causes ...


-5

I think you are lucky since your boy is 3 yrs old ,meaning he can still be corrected and is not too late,the both parties,both u and your partner must unite by making this work,when u say NO to him ,let your partner support your NO,.The bible says beat the child ,and spear the rod...meaning you must be strict on him before it get too late..


6

There are various reason why he/she is doing this. Here is an article with excellent information. Some highlights: Like lying, “stealing” is an adult term that may not mean anything to young children. Candy found clutched in a sticky fist after going through a checkout line or a toy car that turns up in the pocket of a four-year-old after a visit to a ...


0

This is normal and I highly recommend ignoring it as much as you are able. My son who is now 27 months started this around the same age. The more I tried to correct him, the more hilarious he thought it was. He now correctly calls me "daddy" most of the time, but will call me "mommy daddy" whenever he is trying to razz me. This is also an age range ...


1

On the sleeping "issue" did they try any ambient sounds while the child goes to sleep? Try rain/ocean sounds. They help the brain rest and also may prevent any sudden noises from waking the child. Also showing their exhaust and maybe anger while trying to put the child to sleep may stress her. Separation anxiety maybe? There's lot of things that need to be ...


0

I wish I had an answer to help. Unfortunately our 2 year old is very similar. He'll drop off to sleep between 7-8 in his own cot but will wake up after about 4-6 hours and will then only settle in mine and my wife's bed. Where he will constantly kick, roll etc until the morning. Meaning near 0 sleep for us, especially my wife. We fear we have tried most ...



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