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18

Put the child back in timeout and reset the time. Without exception. Like most other parenting duties this is all about consistency. Ignore laughing or other such - the child is trying that behavior out to elicit a reaction from you. Stay calm and firm. Don't interact beyond enforcement (that downtime's the point of the time-out, and they may be trying to ...


12

I have a son the same age, and I can tell you that timeouts are pretty hard at that age. Many don't recommend timeouts until 3, for several reasons - this included. However, we have managed to get our son (after nine months of effort!) to do time outs fairly effectively. First off, we try to make sure to not have them in anger or to make them punishments. ...


11

It would be problematic in the sense that short circuiting the pins may damage the USB charger. There are no health risks. At worst, the child will be subjected to 5 volts. The resulting 'shock' is not only harmless, it is not even noticable, roughly equivalent to replacing the batteries from the tv remote with your bare hands. If instead of poking the ...


9

Since toddlers (and babies) have been (and still are in various other cultures) potty trained this young and younger, apparently without a problem, The missing word here is some - some toddlers have been potty trained this young. Every child is different. Potty training combines two completely different developmental aspects: Physiological - ...


9

At 14 months, most kids can only crawl on the stairs. They will learn walking up much sooner than walking down. What we do/did is to teach the toddler to crawl down with the feet first and belly down - just like you'd climb up, only in reverse. The same technique works for getting off the couch or bed! Toddlers might want to face forward but that ...


8

The key for us is using a timer. We have a 'strong willed' almost-three year old, and he hates transitions (unless there's a big reward or somesuch). Big tantrums. However, we began around 2 using a timer. "Okay, son, we're about done with X activity. I'm setting a timer for 2 minutes; when it goes off, we're going to go [eat|sleep|do something ...


7

Stop using timeouts, which obviously aren't working for you or your daughter, and which have known disadvantages regardless. Instead, try alternative techniques until you find one that works for both of you. UPDATED IN RESPONSE TO COMMENT: Give your kid a hug instead! From a child's point of view, time-out is definitely experienced as punishment... ...


6

Yes, it is common for toddlers to cry when things are not in order. Why? First off, at that age, kids like consistency because it offers a sense of security. Knowing things are always in their place means that other, more important things will also always be in their place - like mommy and daddy will always come home, food will always be on the table, ...


6

If you're worried your baby might fall on the stairs, then yes--definitely. Our daughter began climbing things (stairs, bookcases, etc.) at around eight months; we installed a gate at both ends of the stairs, to block them when we were on either floor. Each baby's different, but eventually they will climb. It's all part of learning to walk. It's good to let ...


6

I believe what you are asking about is water intoxication. To answer your question simply, yes, too much water, especially in a very short amount of time, can lower sodium levels for an 11 month old, an 11 year old, or pretty much anyone at any age. Babies younger than 6 months and athletes are the most vulnerable. Symptoms of water intoxication are (to ...


5

Short answer - Don't. USB sockets only output 5 volts and up to 3 amps (usually 1 amp or less), well below the threshold for if it could hurt anyone, including toddlers. There really isn't a need to spend more money on covers which aren't needed, the only concern would be if somehow your child worked out how to short the current on the charger, although ...


5

Stairs were a hard thing on our end too. Your twins are still pretty young. You have to take in account of how long they've been walking. I wouldn't put a beginner skier on a double black diamond until I was sure they wouldn't hit a tree. Our approach was to continually hold our toddler's hand while we walked down, insisting that she hold the rail. If she ...


4

As the parent to a withholder (from 6 months to 2.5 years!) you have my sympathy, but I must stress to you that it's vital that you completely back off the pressure right now. She absolutely has to be 100% comfortable pooing first and foremost - and as inconvenient as it is if that is in her pants, THAT is where she needs to poo. Holding poo in can cause ...


4

This definitely depends on the kid. My youngest can go up and down stairs with no problem, and he has been able to since 11 months. He learned how to go down stairs (backwards as otherwise noted here) very quickly - over christmas at Grandma's house, who has a single step up to the raised dining room. Nice short drop to practice on, he went up and down ...


4

Remember that Time-Out is not a Punishment. if you believe that then make sure your behavior during/after time-out is also giving same impression to your child. As you said if she is not doing every time, that means she knows that you have given her time out and in certain occasions she feels it is not valid. may be she has seen you doing the similar thing ...


4

Don't ignore it. Ignoring works okay for some things, but aggressive actions it doesn't tend to work well with. 26 months is old enough to understand that he's doing something wrong, and to be doing it for a reason. It sounds like you're generally doing the right thing; correct him when it happens, give him a time out, and afterwards tell him that you ...


4

She's not quite ready. Keep her in a nappy for the next few months. Do keep the potty around and encourage her to sit on it, and get used to it, but keep the nappies on for now. My toddler was the same. We were convinced that by some trick we'd make her understand the peeing thing. She didn't... then one day she just got it. I don't think it was anything we ...


3

You can try the following but I'm not sure how well it works for this kind of situation. You acknowledge that the child is crying and that to them they have a valid reason for doing so. You tell them to use words. You tell them that you cannot understand them when they are crying and that to help them you need to hear them. You ask them what the problem ...


2

We did. We have 15 oak stairs and our adventurous son had no compunctions about climbing all the way to the gate at the top and bouncing up and down on it. Save yourself the gray hairs and throw a gate at the bottom. As he gets older and more conversant with his motor skills you can remove it.


2

One anecdote. A good friend of mine was brain surgeon on Boston Children's Hospital. He would go ballistic every time he saw gates at the top of the stairs. The number one reason for brain surgery on small kids that he saw was kids climbing the gate at the top and then falling down the stairs from a high vantage point head first. This was much much more of a ...


2

For us with an almost-four-year-old, giving a time limit helps. "We can do this for two more minutes, then we're going to do x. Okay?" And get them to acknowledge that, if possible. Then, a "one minute" warning. Then, we ask "Okay, time to do x. What do we have to do to do that?" And encourage them to explain the steps )"Put our shoes on?") Mostly, we just ...


2

As a young infant, my daughter tried to throw a kind of tantrum over some little thing in a restaurant. There was nothing that could be done to make it better. I calmly picked her up and took her out to sit by ourselves in the car while my wife finished her meal. My daughter was getting old enough to understand simple conversation, so I explained that we ...


2

Toddlers cry for the strangest of reasons. My favorite of many stories I heard is "He cried because he wasn't allowed to lick the dog." So I wouldn't take this too serious for now. His crying might either be just random, or it might be an indication that you are enforcing rules to strictly (can't tell from your question). If you think that might be the ...


2

The best advice I can give is to make sure she understands the times when 'No!' or defiance is acceptable and when it's not. Sometimes, "No" is totally okay - "Do you want ice cream?". Sometimes it's not what you want to hear, but it's probably acceptable: "Do you want green beans?". Sometimes it's not acceptable, but you can accept the answer and work ...


2

Normally you stop calling a kid by months once they've reached 2 years of age. Your kid is 2 years of age. Recognize that they are an infant and not a baby anymore. Kids mimic actions. Are you and the wife playing around and hitting each other? He doesn't know the difference. Is he watching shows that show hitting in them? I actually don't watch TV around ...


1

Generally a timeout is due to an action or behavior the child is exhibiting. Leaving the timeout is an act of disobedience, often a different misbehavior than the one that brought them into timeout. At this time it appears you don't have a consequence for leaving the timeout. While there may be other ways to handle the issue, one way is to define the ...


1

I think the crying is not so much about things not being just-so, as it is about the toddler not having control over the world. Being able to control things is a new feature of a toddler's life, and, as with all skills just acquired, toddlers (and babies) tend to practice them to degrees that are unusual for us. My son who just turned three is the same. In ...


1

Potty training is a different thing for every child. Some train at 18 or 20 months, but most train in the range of 2.5 to 3.5 years old. In order to train, you need two things: the awareness of when you need to go, and the ability and willingness to go on the toilet. The first of these is largely a physical trait; at some point, children learn when ...


1

My 1y little girl began climbing the stair when she learnt to crawl. When she learnt to walk, she began going upstairs in a mix of crawling/walking. She can goes all the way up, about 16 steps. When taught her to just climb the first and then sit on it, be it to eat, drink or play with something. She only tries to climb further when someone goes upstairs in ...


1

We try to approach our transitions as intentionally and with as much advanced planning as possible, because they are tough, as you mentioned. We start with the following strategy: Make our child aware there will be an upcoming transition to do something else (eat, sleep, get in the car, etc), and explain why the next thing is important and what will be ...



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