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19

14 months is pretty young to learn to be truly nice to another - he almost certainly has very little empathy at this point. He's not trying to hurt the dog; he's pushing a button that makes a bell ring, basically: cause, effect, nothing more. The fact that the dog doesn't react much is a good thing - it makes it likely to be a shorter phase, rather than if ...


15

It sounds like she might be scared of that particular instructor -- for whatever reason, silly or serious, I think that should be treated as valid. Ask her if she can explain what about him scares her. Swim with her yourself sometimes (not during a lesson) and try to observe particular actions in the water that scare her -- face in the water? water in her ...


10

There's no magic answer for this situation and the desperation you feel now, but there is hope; hope for you and hope for your son. It's not too late. It's hard now, and 30 minutes isn't much time, but it won't always be like this. Thankfully, you're both out of the abusive situation. No one deserves abuse (including you), and while persons who've been ...


8

I believe the infant needs to undergo some sleep training. From personal experience, this is not at all fun for the parents. It requires absolute dedication from the parents in order to be effective, and in the beginning there may not seem to be any benefit to the parents. There are various methods taught, such as the "cry it out" Ferber method. I'm not ...


7

Have you tried teaching her swimming yourself? With both of my kids, we'd go to the pool a fair bit and swim together to get them used to water, basic dog paddle, putting their heads underwater, etc. This means that when they did their proper lessons, at least they were not afraid of the water. A different instructor may help, but I often see parents trying ...


6

I have four adult children, and we played food-as-airplane with all of them. While it's true that they all lost weight upon entering college as they struggled with learning to feed themselves without our entertainment, I can say that they have all achieved normal weight and are adept at self-feeding now. OK, that was an attempt at a joke. :-) Play airplane ...


6

TL;DR: Make an appointment to see your doctor to discuss it. Most people are shocked when a child starts banging their heads. They are afraid the child might might hurt themself, or even have autism. In reality, head banging is relatively common (up to 20% of children have been headbangers at some point), is more common in males, often starts about nine ...


6

It's hard to know the root cause of any behavior that's not medical, maybe because there is rarely one root cause. You have consulted your (pediatrician?) who said it wasn't medical. If you have concerns in that department, you can always get another opinion. If it's not medical, it's behavioral. If it's behavioral, you have the fun job of figuring out why ...


3

As someone who has taught thousands of kids, worked management level at a pool with a massive swimming lesson program and spent literally thousands of hours in the pool I'm gonna jump in on this. First things first: While the pool may have many instructors, it is very very difficult for them to actually change the instructor of a particular class. Not to ...


3

One thing worth doing is adjust the sleeping environment. Reduce the number of soft toys to just their favourite, but make sure that one's in bed every night. Drop the light and noise level by getting proper blackout curtains up, or get a low glow nightbulb or some ambient noise going on. Find what level of noise your child prefers. But the key thing is ...


3

I'm not familiar with the "Sleep Lady Shuffle", but what you describe sounds very normal to me. It's SOP for babies to do that I'm afraid. Continue to be totally consistent with the routine night after night and he'll get used to it and come to expect it. In my experience the best way for me to be present in the room but totally boring is to go to sleep ...


2

I have a similar situation, except my kid is tiny, and my dog is a 73 kg great dane. So the dog doesn't really register the kids "abuses" unless the kid sticks his finger in the dogs eyes or up his nose. Fortunately for us as well, the dog is totally mellow even in those circumstances. Every kid is different, so your mileage might vary, but the ...


1

I think it's reasonable to ask ourselves whether we're setting up something to be repeated rather than just getting past an obstacle, but remember there's also the good associations we may be making. You don't want this to be the only way she'll eat, but on the other hand you don't want to set up the main course as something she only gives lip service too ...


1

With a 15 month old baby /toddler, the most important lesson is life. That said, do not worry about "lessons" or "training", but teach her by example. Take her with you wherever you go, include her in what you are doing (instead of just having her in the stroller) and let her experience the real world. I'm a stounch supporter of the the theory that ...


1

He tries to sit or stand up and I put him down gently but firmly and say "no, goodnight." and he grins and giggles. That goes on for about an hour then he starts finally giving up. If you're doing this consistently (putting him back down) for an hour, he probably finds it an entertaining and rewarding game. Have you tried just ignoring him when he ...


1

First, how lucky you are to experience no nightmares. Most people experience nightmares commonly. When one understands some of the purposes of dreaming, it's not really a surprise. Second, your hypnagogic sleep a disorder that is heritable. This is probably one of the reasons your child has night terrors. Luckily, these terrors aren't as bad as they sound. ...


1

I wasn't going to put this as an answer as I feel it could be better, but due to length... If you want medical advice, then you really need to see a medical professional. I presume it was one who diagnosed you with "hypnagogic sleeping"? As for bad dreams, I have them all of the time and always have — as well as good dreams. Sugar or a full bladder ...


1

It sounds like you're feeding him before his nap. Try feeding him something right after his nap, too. My daughter has always been somewhat sensitive to what she eats and would be cranky from the moment she woke up until she had eaten. Assuming it is a low blood sugar thing, what he eats will have a tremendous impact as high-glycemic foods cause insulin to ...


1

I took Child Development a couple years ago. This is a phase all children (yes, boys and girls) will go through as a self-soothing thing. The phase will stick around for a year or two then mostly vanish. It'll show back up in the teenage years. As for the force your son is using- he'll probably stop when it hurts.


1

Vaseline is the best. Most lotions will sting very chapped skin and the child will resist, but vaseline doesn't sting.


1

My 3yr old also gets restless and cries in her sleep. If she needs to go pee, it's hard to wake her. I use to get mad, but I realize she's not doing this on a purpose or to be lazy. She wakes up and tells me "I'm sorry, Mommy, I'm wet!" So now I just say, "It's OK. Next time try and wake up to pee," and I send her to change herself with a little help of ...



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