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8

If you say dadadadada and she repeats it, she is parroting. If she sees her dada and says "dada", then she is talking. Basically, talking is saying something that reflects a shared reality. Children parrot before they talk. Her first word will be when she says something appropriate (usually a noun) spontaneously. Bye (if she's leaving someone), dada when ...


4

Why would you expect your toddler to be bothered? Babies tastes develop over time - at first the are focused on sweet flavours. What commonly happens is that the child starts to be less interested in their food, so you add in new flavours and textures over time. Doing this helps build their acceptance of tastes. But for now, as long as your baby is ...


4

This isn't a terribly surprising thing for a two year old to do. After all, catch games are fun, aren't they? And in the appropriate environment at the appropriate time, there's nothing better to do than simply play along. However, obviously many times this isn't acceptable. The best way I've found to deal with this was to clearly explain to my son what ...


3

Anongoodnurse's answer is spot on, but I wanted to add a couple of things. First off, don't forget we as humans are amazing at pattern recognition, to the point that we see it where it doesn't belong. You'll hear her 'say' lots of things that seem like perfect words, once, but not again - because she didn't really say it, she just made a sound that your ...


3

13 months is not that old. My 14 month old cries if left alone in a room too long, period! (aka more than 5 min unless he is deeply engrossed in stacking something) have you considered: When she is in her room in the dark, it is separation anxiety and not fear of the dark? Does she cry when if the light is still on? How does she react to low light, like ...


2

I don't have any real 'evidence' for this, but my nephew used to do the same thing. When he was being potty trained, he would go hide in a corner and poop his pants instead of in the toilet, which baffled us completely. He used to hide when wearing a diaper too. One day though, he walked in on his grandma in the bathroom and asked what she was doing, so she ...


2

Maybe you could try alternatives to time-out. I'm the parent of a toddler and I'm having a hard time figuring out what I would put my child in time-out for at this age. Most things she does that are "wrong" (against the rules) are also developmentally appropriate, i.e. she is curious or frustrated or whatever, not disobedient. Some strategies that work for ...


2

The ways we handled this issue: gradually let the get used to the dark by employing low-power nightlights when the child is a little older (3-4) explain about night vision in low light and demonstrate how it works. SOMETIMES the fear of the dark is simply about fear of not seeing.


1

As long as she gets a health variety, the flavors don't matter. It's better to feed her with a spoon or cup than with a bottle so that she can get used to using the front part of her mouth to handle pureed food and liquids. If she always gets a bottle, she'll miss out on the experience of eating. The food goes right past her tongue into the back of her ...


1

I do not know how old your kid is, but I had to travel 12 hours with my 2 year old and his mother, and this worked well: -Travel during the night, so the baby is tired and willing to sleep -Make enough activities before the flight to ensure that the baby get tired enough to sleep well -Sometimes you can have sits where there is an extra place to attach a ...



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