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19

(What is it with toddlers and hot air balloons? Mine can't stand them either -- I think the floating blows his mind... what's holding it up in the air?!?) We frame the holiday in terms of playing pretend: "you get to dress-up and pretend you are something else!" I try to only have mildly scary things around, and also teach him it can be fun to be a little ...


13

That particular irrational fear is common. Take her fears seriously, because they're real to her. Explaining that they are unfounded doesn't work, nor does smiling at or dismissing her fears. If you're reassuring and comforting, she'll learn one more reason to trust you with her feelings (really important) and that it's okay to feel afraid. Then you can work ...


7

From the moment a child begins to see beyond an arm's length, "stay curious" is their watchword. Parents are the first-born people to learn from, so they follow your example at all times. My toddler 16months old follows me to the toilet, sees me on the seat and smiles all the time. This happens at every toilet trip. Once, when I was to bath and I closed the ...


6

This situation is going to recur for years. Develop a long-term strategy for dealing with it based on what is best for your son, not necessarily what is fair. At this age, he's not going to learn any significant lesson from any behavior you choose as long as it's not frightening to him. There are plenty of reasons to stop someone from snatching a toy: value ...


5

I think you're reading way too much into it. He's 2. He might be doing it because he likes to be with his father. He might be doing it because he's eager to continue with whatever he was waiting for you to do something for. He might just be habitually following people who are doing something for him because he's received positive reinforcement when ...


4

Three year olds are definitely old enough to understand 'real' versus 'imaginary/pretend'. My three year old has nightmares where a plane flies into his room fairly regularly; after the first few, I explained to him that it wasn't real, because a real plane can't fit in his room, and he clearly understands that now. Still has nightmares, but has a very ...


3

my style has been to explain that there's really no such thing as ghosts or monsters, they're just stories and toys I think you're already doing it right. My wife's preference is to not even bother with theory, and just frame things in practical ways he understands: "The ghost lives in the shop with his ghost friends. It doesn't like sunlight and ...


3

My oldest child was 4 the first time she went trick or treating. When she was 3, she stayed in with me and gave out the candy. She got the leftovers from the bowl when it is over. That was enough excitement for her and got her used to the idea. The next year, she went out with her younger brother (with Dad as escort). I never took my kids into those ...


3

Your daughter is about the same age as my second son (also 20 months), and he is a very interesting case in this regard. He's demanded food that could be chewed since, no joke, 4 months old; no mash for him, only at least vaguely toothy food. But, he often doesn't chew still to this day - mashes it around and then tries to swallow, but doesn't properly ...


2

The other parent seems to have taken a cue from you.* You didn't say anything and let the her deal with it, which sends the message that it doesn't bother you on behalf of your son. And when that happens repeatedly, the simpler path for her to take was just let her child have the toy -- that way, it doesn't get stolen anymore and she doesn't have to ...


2

Another thing to keep in mind is that time and cause and effect are very fluid concepts (as NoAnswer said, abstract) in the minds of children. They don't, in general, understand the idea of "just a minute" or "in a moment." They have a need/want, and either it's satisfied or it isn't. They don't have a "progress bar." One thing I see a lot of first-time ...


2

My daughter is 2 and 3 months. We had been having problems with manual toothbrushes, so I was advised to use an electric one because they are more "fun" (I have never have an electric toothbrush so at first I did not get the fun part). I bought an electric toothbrush for her and it was an amazing experience. On the warnings at the back of the toothbrush it ...


2

This sounds like a pretty classic case of "night terrors", named not because the baby is terrified, but because he appears to be terrified. Typically, it is seen in preschoolers (as early as 5 month, but peaks at 3.5 years of age) occurs at the same time after falling asleep every night in the early part of sleep happens during deep non-REM sleep when ...


2

Our six year old daughter put on a Darth Vader costume, with mask, early in the month, and it completely freaked our two year old son out. She'd lift the mask up and he'd be fine, she'd put it down and he'd freak out again. We talked about how it was really her under there, and she was just pretending, but he had none of it. After a few minutes of this, ...


1

I firmly believe that when a parent brings their child to a shared play area or play group, then they confer to the rest of the attending guardians the right to interact with that child. (I also believe that each attending guardian has a shared responsibility to ensure the safety of the children and the surrounding property.) In this case, if another child ...


1

One of the most important concerns for a young child is to not have the things they are using taken away from them. Allowing another kid to take your child's toy is not sending the message you need to share it sends the message you cannot be confident that I will protect your right to keep using the toy. You need to take the toy back from the other child ...


1

Young children tend to sleep a lot more deeply than adults, so I don't think this is something you can teach them. Even if your child learns how to do this while she's awake, she most likely wont be able to do it in her sleep. We just try to always use very light (but warm) duvet's rather than much heavier blankets. This tends to help prevent them getting ...


1

This is perfectly normal, healthy behaviour for your child. He watches you in order to learn from you. Please don't do anything to make him feel this behaviour is in any way wrong. Simply go about your tasks with your little shadow in tow. Please don't take this the wrong way, but perhaps it would be worthwhile for you to try to understand your own apparent ...


1

When raising our baby, the changing table was one good place for practicing sound mimicry. I would make a sound, and she would try to imitate. We started with vowel sounds, then work on consonant sounds. Each time she figured out how to form her lips, teeth and tongue to make the sound correctly, I would respond with excitement and laughter. She loved it, ...


1

We simply didn't go to church, pray, or talk much about God in our home because, well, being atheists, God and religion aren't an issue we spend time on. Round about second grade, it came up with our oldest. She asked what church was, and why people went there. I think it was annoying that so many of her friends were unavailable on Sundays. We told her some ...


1

Have you considered co sleeping? This way you dont have to worry about A hurting your younger baby B. Once your younger kid attains 3 years of age, you can shift him.in the same bedroom of A. So this way, they will have a playroom and a bedroom.



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