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7

It appears that children don't learn language well from television because they need interaction and conversation. It's not so much that the "picture on a flat device [isn't] a person", but more that the child doesn't get a response when they try to talk back to the picture. In one study, when children had a conversation over Skype with an adult, they were ...


6

The best way might be to show why people are polite to one another. It's mostly because we are more likely to respond favorably to people who are nice to us. My daughter sometimes has a tendency to just shout "Water!" when she is thirsty, which we almost always respond to with "can you ask nicely?". If she does, we give her water immediately. If she ...


6

At the moment its just a ritual like saying "please" or brushing hair; she is too young to understand the theology. Later you can discuss your beliefs (or lack of them) and the extent to which she should continue respecting her grandparents beliefs. If she notices that you don't follow this ritual then thats probably a good time to start explaining that you ...


5

First: all people are different and have different needs. Do not use the needs of one person to determine the needs of another. What is going on in your child's mind and emotions is unique to her. Some may tell you that you are being manipulated, but I would say that child needs a lot of touch, and close connections with her parents especially before going ...


4

My daughter has recently turned 4 and was raised in somewhat the same way. We speak Dutch to her, but she sees a lot of English videos and stories, so she also picks up some Dutch. She started making proper sentences shortly after she turned 3 and is currently doing quite well. She occasionally mixes English and Dutch words and understands that they mean ...


3

My first thought is that maybe something is making her uncomfortable which causes her to move around more, hit and kick. Could she maybe be teething? When my son is uncomfortable with teething, the main sign seems to be restlessness at night. He'll fidget more and often wake himself up soon after falling back to sleep. Another reason could be if she feels ...


3

I've witnessed my own children not truly display an understanding of apologies, picking up after themselves and other topics that I want them to be more empathetic about. This has been frustrating for me, but I have found it is normal. Here are some resources you can use as references. From Janet Lansbury: Over the years I have heard many of these ...


3

With social niceties like 'Please' and 'Thank You', teaching them is often a combination of training and understanding. Both should be used together, in order to be most effective. This is similar to learning arithmetic: you should learn why 2+2=4, but you also at some point need to memorize the basic sums in order to use them efficiently and progress to ...


3

A 20 month old who said "I'm sorry" because he was told to wouldn't mean he had internalized sorry at having done wrong. It just means he is willing to do whatever he needs to get you to stop being upset at him. But most of our manners are made up of custom and repetition. When someone tells you "I'm sorry" does it necessarily mean that they are actually ...


2

The childcare has a responsibility to treat your child appropriately and according to your wishes. That said, there may be practical reasons why they need to put him in nappies (hygiene and having to wash the carpets). I've had exactly the same experience with my daughter. Every 30 minutes seems far too often, and could easily be off-putting to a small ...


2

My daughter didn't have allergies, but she did have quite bad reflux, and also had oral motor issues that made eating difficult (we feed her now through a g-tube). She also required anti-seizure medicine orally, so keeping her food down was even more important than just weight gain. The tendency when a child is underweight is to overfeed, but this can ...


2

There are a few possible causes. It may be that your son likes the taste or texture of dinner, even though he is not hungry, and therefore he chews on the food but isn't really motivated to swallow. It may be a control issue: he's essentially saying I don't have to swallow and you can't make me, and that grin definitely points (at least in part) to him ...


2

A portable co-sleeper might be a good option for this case. I used one with my daughter. It's like a small bassinet with no legs, and is meant to go in the parent's bed, between the adults. Because it has sides, she wouldn't be able to kick her dad, and there are models that have openings so you can nurse. Also, since it is portable, I found it helps ...


1

We switched both of ours to toddler beds between 18 and 20 months, so that's certainly not "too young" in my opinion and experience. Switching to a toddler bed in our case was driven by necessity: both of ours could climb out of the crib by that age. If your daughter can't climb out of the crib yet, you certainly don't need to, but that's not to say you ...


1

There may be several alternatives to just locking her into her room, that may lead to your final goal of getting her to sleep alone. Would it be very bad for the sleep of the older child to let your younger one sleep in the same room? I had a hard time moving my oldest son out of our bed to his own room, but it was relatively easy to move my middle child to ...


1

We used an variety of techniques, but I know many people have had success with other techniques. The most important is to be patient, recognize if your child is developmentally and/or physically ready to recognize body cues. My tips: have a plan and discuss with all caretakers so your son will have consistent help and support. no yelling/shaming for ...


1

First, it's extremely unlikely that a 2 year old really understands the issues and the logical, scientific, and historical arguments for and against any given religion or non-religion. I wouldn't try to burden her with difficult subjects beyond her understanding. Second, you have to consider just how far you want to go with this, considering that it will ...


1

Just because it hasn't been mentioned here before: Normally it takes years until children can establish the complete decoupling between dreams and motion that adults take for granted. Maybe your daughter is just dreaming about physical activities. Even if this started at a time when something else changed, you should be open to the possibility that it's just ...


1

One thing I've seen done is using something to create space on the bed, such as a pool noodle or longer 'side' pillows (like you sometimes buy during pregnancy to support your back or go between your legs). Similar to swilliam's suggestion, but with things you have around the house; that way when toddler moves around, he/she kicks the noodle or pillow and ...


1

I know many people who were raised religious and are atheists, and many others who grew up atheist and are religious. I'm personally religious despite grown up in a fairly skeptical household, and judging by your question, you are agnostic despite having been raised religious. Given that your child (and mine) will grow up in a world with both religious ...


1

Treat it like any other rule where you and society disagree on how to raise your child. Imagine if you said "I don't want my child to drink soda until she is 20", and go from there. Setting the rule Obviously in your own home, explain the rule and don't break it yourself (this should be fairly easy) For people your child is around a lot and who might ...


1

I think it is not so much about what devices/apps should be allowed but about the time limits. Our daughter, now 3.5 is allowed to use the iPhone or the Laptop, but we try to limit it to max. half an hour. From experience she rarely stops using electronic devices herself, we have to enforce the limit. She likes browsing photos, Videos on YouTube, Skype ...


1

The answer for this is essentially the same as it is for monolingual (and polylingual) children. While each individual is unique, the advancement to the use of full sentence structure, as opposed to isolated words, arises from how the individual is exposed to language. In the first years of life, everything is new, so the brain is in constant learning ...


1

Demanding a specific action from a toddler always bears the risk of escalation if both toddler and parent are strong-willed. Ask yourself wether you are willing to enter into a battle of wills and humiliation over a matter of manners/morals. I've been there and don't want to go there again. From my experience, it's easier and more effective to concentrate ...


1

Children typically begin to develop self awareness between 15 and 24 months old which is the skill necessary to begin to develop empathy , so your daughter is at a good age to be learning this. This is also the age where they well through imitating others, especially adults, so one of the best ways to teach them is through modeling the desired behavior. ...


1

As a young child and even today as a 48.5 year old man, I wiggle my fingers in front of my eyes. I have done it all my life. Only recently did I figure out that what I was doing was helping myself focus as I am slightly ADHD. I imagine my fingers being as "fire" consuming the page in front of me, as I read. I did this most often as a child, while trying to ...


1

We did the 20 minutes sit on toilet with our first son and, to be honest, it became a management problem since we were forcing him to do it on our terms rather than on his own. We did not use any diapers (or barely any) and stressed him to use the toilet/potty and we had messes more often than not. With our second son, we decided we would let him tell us ...


1

I don't know if the behavior is "normal", but it's certainly something I've heard of before (though not something my kids have done). It's probably largely what you say - a small rebellion. Children around two are learning that they have some control over things, and they like seeing what that entails. One of the things he has control over is eating - ...


1

Although it's hard to change the way that you've been putting your child to sleep now that it's such an ingrained habit, it's not too late - you can do it. From when they were tiny, I would let my babies go to sleep in my arms and then I'd put them in bed and that's how they were used to going to sleep too. The way that I transitioned them was: Make sure ...


1

Based on your specific question, there is no answer that fits all unfortunately. It really depends on what your child is exposed to, what you as a parent do, and what you encourage. These are the three basic foundations for a child liking or disliking some sort of activity. My daughter absolutely loves trains, dinosaurs and lego. I don't buy into the ...



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