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57

My son (similar age) calls both me and his mum "Daddy". He also has a habit of calling all animals Cows or Sheep. Like Erica says in the comment, it's pretty standard. They've learnt a single word which at the moment means "Parent/Adult/Someone that's not Me". As they learn more words they can elaborate on the distinction. Just reinforce the difference ...


14

My rule of thumb is simple: My children are free to make informed decisions about themselves that will not cause extended suffering or a trip to the ER/doctor or worse. So, if it's freezing outside, I won't allow them to risk frostbite. If we're going to be out for a while, I won't allow them to risk hypothermia. If we're going to the car, then into a ...


13

TL; DR: We've been through the same thing, and we tried to explain to my daughter what was going to happen ahead of time, without hiding anything. Overall, it was a painless process, and after a month in the new flat, she seems to have adapted to her new environment. We went through exactly the same situation a few months ago with my 2.5 year old daughter. ...


10

It sounds like you are giving her too much control and now shes basically in charge here. Instead of letting her have 5 more minutes... 5 more minutes... 5 more minutes... Approach her with a warning that you are going to leave (or change activity). "Ok honey in 10 minutes we are going to put on our coat to go to day care." Then in 5 minutes "5 more ...


8

This is no big deal, and you shouldn't sweat it. My daughter is almost 2 1/2 and calls her aunt "Uncle Meghan," and everyone thinks it's hilarious. Both of my kids have gone through the same as yours, and I cemented the fact that my name was not "Mommy" by jokingly saying, "I-AIN'T-CHE-MAMA!" -- which evokes laughter and slowly brings the point home as ...


7

This is entirely up to you. I allowed my kids to choose their clothing from a very early age, but to cover off the particular after issue around cold weather, if they decided not to wear gloves or a hat etc and I thought they would be necessary, I'd take them along with me so that when they got cold they could ask for them, and I'd suggest that next time ...


7

Some answers are suggesting to correct thus: "Dada not Mama!". For an infant it is much better to correct more simply, without the negative: "Dada!" The negative is an advanced mental construct that the infant has not yet acquired (as illustrated by the "Not-Pippa" example given by one writer here). In the same way that "Don't think of the blue banana" ...


6

This is a problem a lot of parents face, and the best treatment is most definitely not convenient. I'm sure you're already doing a lot of this, but... The short answer: do everything you can to minimize all sources of irritation from mechanical (wipe/wash cloth/diaper/cotton balls) to chemical (urine/soaps/alcohol/chemicals/stool), decrease moisture (air ...


6

There are various reason why he/she is doing this. Here is an article with excellent information. Some highlights: Like lying, “stealing” is an adult term that may not mean anything to young children. Candy found clutched in a sticky fist after going through a checkout line or a toy car that turns up in the pocket of a four-year-old after a visit to a ...


5

At some point, children start doing everything they can come up with in order to stay out of bed the longest they can. Drink, eat, hug, pee, poo, light, change diaper - that was our daughter's list. She requested all those things in random order every evening; sometimes we complied, sometimes not - until we said enough. There is only one thing to do: you ...


5

Unless your 3 year old is hocking the stuff on ebay, "stealing" is the wrong word to use. A 3 year old may take stuff to play with it, or hide it, but the child is most certainly not "stealing". Don't confuse this with adult behaviour. It is completely unrelated. I would simply try to point out to the child that this habit of hiding things, causes ...


4

By the way, my son's phase passed very quickly and I'll tell everyone what worked for us. We made him a little photo album filled with about 20 pictures of all his favorite people and a little rhyme on each page. He loved to look at it and had to keep his eyes open to do so, and to tell him classmates and teachers about who is in the book. It was gold! This ...


4

Correcting a child has a very strong component of "choosing your battles." If you try to control every little thing in their life, when they reach teen-age years and start questioning their parents, they will be a lot more likely to rebel against every bit of your authority. If you choose your battles and only correct when really necessary, they will be a ...


4

This is normal that she drinks less water in winter time. Is it not the same for you? But about your problem - try using some children water bottles (with her favorite character) and leave it so she can easily access it. add some frozen berries or slice of lemon or orange to glass of water use a straw My 2 year old likes to drink a lot if she can drink ...


4

We also went through it with our kids, several times. Our first international move, from the U.S. to Peru, was when our oldest was 3.5 and our second had just turned 2. Then we moved from Peru back to the U.S. four years later, with a third child who'd been born in Peru and was just shy of 2 years old at the time of the move. In the 11 years since, we've ...


3

Your post makes me laugh as I reminds me time when my son was younger. He was around 2 years old (I don't remember exactly). He had period when he called me and my wife "mama" and after while he switch and call both of us "dada", and after while whole circle starts from beginning and he called us "mama". So don't worry, just each time when you call "mummy" ...


3

Yes, this happened to us with our eldest son. He was slow learning to talk and didn't see the use of it, as his parents were clairvoyant anyway. Not. We were however, very good at discerning his needs and wishes. Which did not exactly help with his learning. 'Mama' was actually one of his first words, soon followed by 'Papa'. And my wife was quite miffed ...


3

Sounds like you've got a bright child there, and it's good that you're thinking about these things early. Starting school ahead (i.e., starting kindergarten at 4 instead of 5) is something that is controversial, and it's unclear on what the right answer is. If it's something you're thinking about, I encourage you to do your own research on the matter. ...


3

I think I would differentiate between "Warm clothes" and the often-uncomfortable outside layer (gloves, hats, scarves, coats). Warm non-outerwear is harder to change later; warm outerwear is easier. Since kids at that age have a hard time planning for future difficulty, I tend to give more flexibility with the outerwear than the non-outerwear. For us, 4 ...


2

I will suggest what we do here in India for bright children. 1) put him in summer school for small kids 2) take him to zoo, museums, ancient places (like forts) , puppet show etc. Tell small stories around it. 3) importantly, tell him lots and lots of bedtime stories/tales from history, mythology, religion, scientists, mathematicians repackaged as small ...


2

Assuming that your doctor hasn't instructed otherwise: As long as she isn't throwing up immediately, every time she takes even a few sips, yes, continue breastfeeding. It will likely be helpful to feed smaller amounts more often until she is feeling better. And as always, if worried, call your doctor for advice. Having actually examined your daughter, ...


2

I have a son going through this phase... started addressing me as something halfway between "Mom" and "Mamá" (his mother is a native Spanish speaker, I've studied a certain amount of Spanish) at 14 months or earlier, still calls me that often at 20 months. Sometimes I remind him, "I'm your daddy. Yo soy tu papá. Mommy is over there. Mamá está allá." I ...


2

My daughter did something like this for a while -- sometimes she would say "Daddy" sometimes "Mummy" but she would use either word for either parent. We tried correcting her for a while, until it dawned on us that "Mummy" meant "I want comfort from a parent (either parent)" and "Daddy" meant "I'm having fun and I want a parent to play with me (either ...


2

With a bit of luck, this may remain a hypothetical problem - the "Lego phase" might dwindle down soon or your younger one might turn out to be a child that actually doesn't "eat" every crumb he finds on the floor. (We were lucky in the latter sense.) But it's always better to be prepared. The first meassure is always to separate the toddler and the pile ...


2

Firstly, if you're going to a specialist clinic I would assume that they are going to give far better and tailored advice that "the internet" will be able to, especially from the few details you give in the question. I think the main problem might be that he (very understandably) prefers breastfeeding to solid food! Now, obviously you cannot control your ...


2

We did this some years ago. As far as our son was concerned it was all an excellent adventure. He was too young to be sad about losing friends, and the airplane and airport were exciting and interesting. If you are flying then read the fine print on luggage allowances carefully. We were able to bring a full size suitcase and hand baggage as "his" luggage, ...


1

Yes, it's just a toy, however I also think the way the play with toys can sometimes be an indicator of how they'll play with other children or animals. We ask our children to play carefully and respectfully with their toys. With their stuffed animals, we ask them to treat them gently, as if they were real animals. I don't think there is anything wrong with ...


1

Odds are it's as Dariusz says, just delaying bedtime. But, do consider the possibility that he's constipated, also. Our two year old (who's completely potty trained now) has this happen periodically, where he says he needs to poop, then tries, can't, then does it again twenty minutes later. Typically it's because he's a bit constipated (as he tends to ...


1

On the sleeping "issue" did they try any ambient sounds while the child goes to sleep? Try rain/ocean sounds. They help the brain rest and also may prevent any sudden noises from waking the child. Also showing their exhaust and maybe anger while trying to put the child to sleep may stress her. Separation anxiety maybe? There's lot of things that need to be ...



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