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28

I started looking into research relating to the value that toddlers might get from a museum visit, and I'm almost overwhelmed by the number of quotes and discussions I found (much of it from the museum's perspective). The Importance of Taking Children to Museums from the National Endowment for the Arts Art Works Blog (the post includes links to a great ...


21

It can be tricky! Remember the core principles of "reinforce good behaviour"; "see things from the child's POV"; and "distract from undesired behaviour". Start with the glasses. Do they fit? are they comfortable? Do they hurt or irritate the child? Try asking the child why they don't want to wear them. Find some characters or toys that wear glasses that ...


15

I would say that it is not needed to wait. Contrary to @Alexander, I would not stop completely to ask for kisses, as my wife and me often do with our 4 years old girl. And also, as I do with my wife, and as she does with me. I think asking for kisses from someone you love is acceptable with childs as well as with adults. The thing you can do is teach her ...


13

Infants learn how to socialize and express their emotions by interacting with adults, primarily with their parents. Developing a positive, "happy" bond with the mother is good for babies, and depression interferes with that. Maternal postpartum depression during the child’s first year of life significantly predicted internalizing behavior problems. ...


12

Yes, visiting an art gallery or history museum is great for toddlers. We live in London and are blessed with a huge number of world class free museums and I would say that taking a toddler to a museum is an amazing experience for both parents and toddler. You will be surprised by how rewarding it is for all of you. We have been taking our daughter to ...


11

When my daughter was 18 months old, she would always give us kisses when we asked. Now she is a little older and, if she doesn't want to give us a kiss when we ask, she doesn't. We didn't have to teach her, she just figured it out. Perhaps you should begin to worry about this if it becomes a problem with other people but I think she will figure it out for ...


10

This is the sort of issue that happens all the time with toddlers and preschoolers: when sufficiently well rested and fed, they're polite and well behaved, but when something's amiss things go poorly. When this happens with us, we address it by triaging the problem first, and then make a choice based on that result. Why did he refuse to ask nicely? ...


10

Pretty much every page of every children's book we own has new learning opportunities for our two year old! It's a pretty awesome time. You can always go into more detail about the illustrations and the story. In general, these are the subjects I ask questions or make comments about: Sizes - Big, smaller, bigger, smaller, medium, tall, short, etc. ...


10

These things help me: Time. Things get easier again when your kids get bigger. They'll never go back to the way they were... but they will get easier. Keep telling yourself that. It might even be true. Acceptance. You've got less time for you, work, etc. and that's just they way it is. Learn to see the time you invest in your child as more valuable than ...


10

Searching "early formal academics" will provide quite a few resources on this subject. Moving up the Grades: Relationship between Preschool Model and Later School Success by Rebecca Marcon is a good representative source. A lot of parents feel like pushing more formalized education earlier gives the child a head start, but there's a growing body of ...


10

One of my twins (3yo) needs to wear glasses, because his left eye is weaker than the right one; not correcting his sight could result in one of his eyes becoming lazy. You can't force the child to wear them, and at that age you can't quite reason him into wearing them either: the only thing that will work is if the child makes the decision to wear them ...


8

Oh @Kate do I feel your pain! I have that kid too; he's 4, and the other morning he was up at 4:30 playing with his trucks in his room. First thing I will suggest is that you take care of YOU. I know I'm a much more patient mom when I get exercise, or meditate, or do something to keep my body and mind together. Have you tried cutting out the daytime ...


7

I'll answer your question with a question. University kids are able to learn advanced calculus and how to interpret difficult books and understand human psychology. Why don't I just wait until the kids are at that level, because then all of that high school maths will be so much easier for them? The reason is that knowledge builds upon knowledge. You lay ...


7

Just talk with your kid. Have a lot of conversations. Kids have an amazing ability to digest language and separate words into the correct language. They also have the ability to be stubborn, willful and belligerent. If she doesn't want to speak it, you may not be able to change that yet. My daughter is fluent in a second language (her mother's) but it has ...


6

You should tell her not to when she starts kissing those you believe shouldn't receive that level of intimacy from her, and you should be an example of appropriate intimacy levels with others. You may want to encourage her to perform these social acts with those you do want her to have that type of relationship with - kissing grandparents and siblings might ...


6

We've started trying to bring the stories alive by acting the stories and using props and toys. For example: We're Going on a Bear Hunt - Searching the house for different "animals" i.e. stuffed toys. We ask what the animal sounds like, what it looks like and where does it live. A hidden iPod with speakers can add to the realism (Or dad doing his best ...


6

At two, while you certainly can begin working on alphabet and numerals and counting, I tend to feel that the most important things are creativity, emotions, and breadth of experience. By breadth of experience I mean to encounter a lot of different things, such that not only can the child learn about new concepts, vocabulary, cultures, and ideas, but the ...


6

Getting toddlers to keep their glasses on Welcome to the world of toddler glasses! It's tough to get a toddler used to wearing their glasses all the time, but be patient. Over time they will eventually accept them, and may soon start asking for them. Here are two articles on the subject, along with a few tips from them: ...


6

I would suggest a 3rd option. Our kids are bilingual in English (used in preschool) and Danish (used at home). They are currently 2 & 4. We speak almost only Danish to them, though we do read some some books in English. Both of them, when starting to speak, started in mostly Danish, then switched to some words in English, some in Danish. We never ...


5

In contrast to most of the other answers, I don't come with statistics or scientific basis for my response, simply a personal anecdote from last weekend. If the museum is reasonably child friendly, and it aligns with things that hold the child's interests in a way that's accessible to them, it can be great. As an example, here in town there's the National ...


5

If you telling her "no" in this context was inconsistent with the usual rules, then I would try to explain to her (as much as is possible to an 18 mo old) why you said "no." That is unless based on previous rules you should have said "yes" in which case, I would explain to her that you made a mistake and make up for it. If the "no" was consistent with ...


5

You write that your day used to be very planned and organized, and that you had time for workouts, meditation, reading books and other stuff. In addition, your question was migrated here from Personal Productivity.SE. My first guess would be that you didn't have much slack built into your routine. Might that be right? I am all for improving your ...


5

Kramii nailed it and I have a confession to make. My first daughter 5 years back became the reason I truly started to learn how to organize my life. From a person with a lot of personal space yet not much of achievement, I became a person who had no personal space and far lesser time due to fatherhood yet with a lot of achievement and successful years. ...


5

At 2 years old, your son doesn't understand (or care) why you want him to wear his glasses. All he knows is that you keep putting a thing on his face, and he doesn't like that thing on his face. No amount of explaining or pleading or threatening will make a difference. So, you'll want to take a behavioral approach. Break it down into a series of small, ...


5

Children develop at their own speed. Especially language shows a lot of variation. Some start early and form complex sentences soon, others start early, stay at the one- or two-word stage for a looong time, then catch up and some are virtually mute, then improve drastically and "never stop talking" again. If you search around here at Parenting SE there are a ...


5

For the record I am looking at this question as two different sub question. First question is when do humans gain temporal awareness? and when are they are they able to make sense of this temporal awareness? (I.E when are humans able to construct a meaningful relationship between their temporal awareness and a language). Also, I think I should make this ...


4

Make sure mealtimes look like mealtimes: Have children in highchairs. Have the highchairs pulled up to the table. Have adults sit and eat with them at the same time. Lead by example (i.e. do not throw food around yourselves!) Where possible eat the same food as the children are having. Do not offer endless alternatives that the children can have instead. ...


4

I was very daunted by potty training. When my son was 2 1/2 he started peeing outside in the summer on the grass so I thought maybe he was ready. When I put him in underwear he cried and complained and peed in them. Not until recently he is 3 yrs. and 4 months did he tell me straight away that he didn't want to wear diapers anymore. We came home one day and ...


4

We visit quite a few museums with our kids. You might be surprised at the experience. Some museums are very clearly geared toward adults, but the vast majority make a great deal of effort to appeal to all ages. They are designed as places for active learning rather than shrines for silent pondering. Even if the kids don't learn anything directly, they ...


4

Especially with art museums, you can easily construct games that will make things more interesting. For example, keep a running tally of the appearances of Baby Jesus and Baby John the Baptist--counting is fun, and babies are fun. And then when your kid is old they'll realize you sneakily taught them how to recognize the art historical customs for ...



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