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11

Personally I think you are already doing the right thing with your early bedtime / 3m solitary approach. I think its important for you to realise that every child (and adult) will play up and be very annoying at times. It is all part of growing up, and learning and establishing boundaries. I think the important thing you need to do, is to be consistent. If ...


10

In my experience, the most effective time limit at that age is until you're ready. If the discipline is for refusing to pick up his toys, the consequence is time out "until you're ready to pick up your toys." Then you ask in 3-minute intervals if he is ready to do it or not. This ties the consequence directly to the desired behavior, and lets the child ...


9

There's no easy solution, but a good general approach in addition to consistent consequences is validation and teaching an alternative. Kids have feelings and they want to express them, but need to be taught socially acceptable ways to do so. So when he takes your cell phone, validation is acknowledging you understand why he took it. The alternative to be ...


8

Sending an almost 3-year-old to their room for, potentially, all day seems a bit excessive. I mean, an almost 3-year-old could conceivably lose all five tickets before noon, and by the end of the day he probably isn't going to even remember why he was sent to his room to begin with. But I do agree that your modified plan starts getting a little ...


7

I don't think there is any connection to indoors/outdoors and introvert/extrovert. However, a 18 month old is really developing very fast, and should be developing social, motor and language skills. it is not clear from your question if your child is cared for in a nursery/daycare or if he/she is at home with you while you work? Do you mean going 'out' ...


7

Perhaps the grin means he is getting the attention that he was seeking. Throwing things at people or hitting people seems like he wants to be noticed. My 3.5 yo will act up if he feels left out. If this is the case, you have two options: head it off before he acts up or punish after he acts up. My very strong willed daughter (now 10) was more than happy ...


6

At 15 months she's probably too young to really grasp "fire hurts" without directly interacting with the fire, and you REALLY don't want that, so you'll need to attenuate the dangers and teach as if the gate weren't there. Put the gate back up and sternly tell her 'NO' when she gets near it. Use the short attention span of the toddler to your advantage; try ...


6

You can work on not making it negative since it sounds like that's your goal. Positive discipline calls it a positive time out - invite the child to take some space to calm down. Beforehand, brainstorm with them what/ where would help them calm down. Is it coloring or reading or listening to a certain cd? Empower your child to learn self-regulatory behavior! ...


4

I don't know what you do, specifically for his timeouts (does he sit in a chair in the corner? Does he stand, facing the corner? Does he just sit on the couch or a chair somewhere?), but what I found works for my son is sit him on a stool in the middle of the room and ignore him for a few minutes. The stool is too high for him to try to get down, and he ...


4

My wife and I have had a lot luck with 1-2-3 magic when we stick to it. Even when he was two years old. This involves no screaming or trying to reason with the child just counting for each time he doesn't listen and putting the child in timeout without talking to the child while putting them in or while in timeout. Also after the time is up the issue is ...


4

At home we have the same kind of discipline as described in this answer : How can we discipline our toddler ? Basically I have found that the most important thing (with my 2-years old daughter at least) is to : warn first about the consequences do what you said afterwards Basically this would mean in your case (after a first, more casual request) "Son, ...


3

You are right that hitting him will just teach him that's a reasonable way to resolve conflict. Kids basically want to please and work with us (the parents/caretakers) -- it just gets expressed in, uh, less than optimal ways sometimes. This means that you can work with him; he wants to! It's just that he's 3 and haven't learned how to yet; that's your job ...


3

You try other things. You escalate. You do not allow him to win. If you do not teach your child to respect authority he will have exceptionally difficult teen and adult years. ** Take things away. ** Lock him in a room. ** Corporal punishment, if you are so inclined. I recommended The Strong Willed Child by Dobson in another answer. I recommend it here as ...


3

The primary problem is that you are imposing a punishment. While punishment is necessary in some cases, it is a losing strategy in the long term. You make yourself into the "bad guy" for administering the punishment, and it also sends the signal that it's OK to do bad things as long as he doesn't get caught. There will be trouble as soon as you take your ...


3

I don't think a specific amount is really definable, in particular because each child is different. However, the AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics) endorses "Caring for our Children", a set of national standards for childcare environments (ie, daycares). Their recommendation: Outdoor play: Infants (birth to twelve months of age) should be ...


3

The purpose of a timeout is to deny a child your attention, since this is what he wants most in the world, and to give him time to settle himself if he is overwrought. The 1-2-3 Magic method suggests 3 minutes for a 3-year-old or until the tantrum subsides, whichever is longer. You should not respond to any calling out from the other side of the door. The ...


2

We used food. Early on, after cooking a meal and setting the plate in front of our daughter, we would tell her not too touch it because "It's hot". Eventually she would get curious and touch the still hot food. It would be hot enough for her to let it go and understand "Holy moley, that hurt", but not hot enough to burn her and scar. We would then reiterate ...


2

We did something very similar, but additionally (while being right there) let our eldest reach out quite far towards the fire until he went "Ow, hot hot hot." This was still a good few inches away, but he never went close to a fire again. Giving that element of controlled danger can embed a caution response quickly.


2

First, it may help to think hard about why he's misbehaving. Is he being naughty to get attention, whether the attention is negative or positive? Is he going through any difficult life changes (moving, divorce, new siblings, loss of a loved one, etc), having a hard time adjusting to preschool, etc? Having a hard time sharing his feelings or otherwise ...


1

Rule of thumb, 1 min for each year of age. We sit them on the stairs. Then briefly explain and reflect at the end of the period, followed by a hug. We do escalate to removing the very limited pre-teatime TV they sometimes watch. Tickets seems awfully complicated to me. edit I just saw a previous answer with a reference to our approach. Dare I say it I think ...


1

I have had kids that respond to time out and kids that don't. For me it depends on the behaviour, but in general what happens to him at the end of time out? Forcing him to say I am sorry for... makes him own the behavior and he may not come out of time out (after the 1 min. for each year of age) until he is ready to say it. I had one daughter stay in time ...


1

How about making it official? When the child is calm and you have some alone time, talk to him about this behavior and ask him what he thinks about it, and when you get to a point that he agrees that the action isn't a good choice. After that ask him to draw a chart where you track the opposite behavior each day. So you can write: Not Throwing things at ...



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