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8

This is typical infant behavior. Keep in mind infants typically don't know what their hands are doing, that they can control them, or that they are even part of their own body. (My 5 month old son still wakes himself in the night, by whacking himself in the face -- he thinks someone else is doing it! I have to tightly wrap him in a blanket, to jeep his ...


7

Sucking his thumb at this age is appropriate. The next stage will be putting most things in his mouth. Encourage your little one to explore his world through his mouth. There are more receptors and development there than the rest of his body at this age. Give him lots of appropriate toys & teethers to chew on too, especially when he can hold them. Sounds ...


5

Do: I'd let her do it at least until she can deliberately grab other objects to suck on instead. The only thing you should check is that the skin of the hands don't get irritated from being moist all the time, and keep the nails short (though infant nails usually don't need to be clipped because they're so soft in the first place). If moist hand skin becomes ...


5

Far from preventing him, you should be encouraging him if possible. This is great way for babies to comfort themselves - now that your son has found his thumb, he shouldn't need dummies/pacifiers any more. He's getting self-sufficient :-)


5

It may sound weird but another option is tape. A friend of mine had the same problem when she was about that age and at night before bed her mother would put duct tape over her thumb to keep her from sucking it. It took a while but eventually it worked. Just for clarity: Duct tape was used but it was put on in such a way that the child was able to ...


4

One thing that can help is to put a thin mitten on when she goes to bed. Since she only does this in her sleep, and it makes her thumb hurt, she'll understand that this helps her thumb not to hurt when she wakes up, and should accept the mitten. (Although be aware that she might be sucking her thumb during the day as well, just not when you see it. ...


3

As he is only 2-months, there is nothing wrong with him sucking his thumb, its only natural. As he grows older, he will gradually forgo this habit. But at the moment, he is a baby!


3

For starters, introducing a pacifier is the wrong approach -- it's another dependence, just as bad for her teeth, and worse -- a choking habit in a child with strong enough bite to sever it! Try covering her thumb at night with an unpleasant-tasting but harmless substance such as hot sauce or lemon juice, or having her wear gloves/mittens to bed. It's just ...


3

Could he be teething? In that case he might find the pacifier too soft, and he's looking for something with more chewable resistance. Try offering him teething toys (put them in the fridge first for added effect) and see if he likes them more than the pacifier. If he's not teething, it might be that he has discovered/decided that he dislikes that ...


3

It seems that your daughter really wants to stop sucking their thumb but habit sabotages her efforts at night. The following technique has been helpful for other children who wanted to quit. Use an ace bandage and wrap her arm from 6 inches above to 6 inches below her elbow of the arm with the offending thumb. Wrap both if she sucks both. The wrap SHOULD ...


2

We tried the sauces and things but they got over the bed, bandaid's and mittens and stuff worked. I think at one point we had a bandaid under a mitten, since we knew the mitten would get taken off at some point.


2

I would talk to your dentist. She may suggest a fixed palatal crib or other corrective device. The idea behind these devices is they prevent the thumb from touching the gums and make thumb sucking uncomfortable. After a month or so, the habit is broken.


1

My brother sucked his thumb until late in his teens. What got him to stop was his own desire to grow up and become accepted by his peers. This is a tad creative and unique, but how about letting the child stay up all night. Then she will fall asleep without it. Once she is awake, you can congratulate her on her first night without using it. Then inspire ...


1

I agree with the comment that the behavior is typical. I have a 4 month old who eats her hand. I will say...it helps her immensely with her teething. I can see her rubbing her gums because her little teeth are starting to push through. If its not her hand its going to town on some toy (I dont think the pacifier provides enough resistance so she's weening ...



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