Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

25

There is sufficient reason, imo, to be concerned. Research findings to date might suggest a correlation between television viewing and developmental problems, but they cannot show causality. Enough, in fact, that the American Academy of Pediatrics has issued a policy statement suggesting that children 2 and older be restricted to no more than 1 to 2 hours ...


14

Beofett's answer is excellent, but I would like to add a few personal observations which were too long for a comment. Youtube, specifically, can be very hard to control. Our toddler (3.5 years) does get to watch stuff there, but you have to be vigilant. Examples: Looking at toys helicopters, easily browsed to real helicopters, then to some wartime ...


13

Good observations. I see things in sort of the opposite way, so let's compare. I feel that commercials are the evil twin of TV entertainment, especially when they're aimed at kids, especially when they appear between kids' shows. I don't want to indoctrinate consumerism into my kids' heads; there's plenty of opportunity elsewhere. That's one reason why I ...


11

On the other hand ... I was making my living as a freelance graphic designer when my children were small (way pre-iPad), and was constantly reading warnings against letting children spend too much time on the computer. I read to them a great deal, and did other activities with them as a "stay-at-home mom." But since I was actually making my living at home, a ...


9

This is of course very subjective, but one of the reasons I dislike TV is because of the advertisements. My kid starts asking for everything from snacks that she tries once and never touches again to expensive toys. I also think that finding new shows isn't necessarily an advantage, either. It starts out with just getting to watch one show a day, then she ...


8

On top of the great answer from bmgh1985 (and I'd particularly second their recommendations of 'Something Special' and 'Balamory') here are some more suggestions: In the Night Garden: Very safe, very gentle stories for real littlies which sometimes star female characters, sometimes male (and sometimes ones where you can't tell). The DVDs have a special ...


8

I think we are spoiled in the UK as we have some great programming available. If you can find them, here are some to watch out for: Balamory - Lead is a scottish lady and there are diverse characters included from other races and also disabled characters (another thing i like about our shows). Something Special - there is one main guy in it but he works ...


6

Toddlers and pre-schoolers do not have terribly long attention spans, generally speaking. 21 minutes (roughly the time of a half-hour show, minus commercial breaks) can be a long time for a kid to sit and follow uninterrupted dialog. In order to appeal to parents, shows targeting that age range will frequently try to work some sort of "edutainment" ...


6

It sounds like you're generally taking the right tack on this - explaining your reasoning calmly. You don't give a lot of other details, so some of these may be what you're already doing, but here's what I'd do. What you might want to do as the next step, if you're not already doing this, is let your child know when, or under what conditions, she will be ...


5

Some other options that might be worth taking a look at: Sid the Science Kid is more inclusive than some of the other PBS options. While the characters are Muppets, they've also got recognizable ethnicity. Ni Hao, Kai-Lan or Dora the Explorer from Nick Jr. -- while each has a non-white, female protagonist, there aren't a whole lot of other human characters ...


5

TV overuse kills imagination Television provides an almost complete experience for us and our children. It provides images and sounds, which are probably the source of 90% of stimulai. When we watch tv we are fully immersed in it, but we are only the receivers. We do not add anything of our own to the experience. When a child watches TV, it is actually not ...


4

Personally, my kids watch more DVDs than live TV. But they watch on-demand programming (via Netflix) way more than either of those options. So my take on the pros and cons: Schedule: With live TV, you have to revolve your schedule around the show you want to watch. Dinosaur train comes on at 11:30? Ok, now you have to actually be home at 11:30 to see it. ...


4

First, I wouldn't call this excessive just yet. Without knowing what it is that frightens him, it's hard to say if its a "normal" reaction or not. Is he scared of Phineas' spiky hair? Or that what they're doing is super dangerous and somebody could get hurt? To begin, I would strong encourage deep probing to really understand what it is that scares him, ...


4

In addition to the answers already given, I'd also add My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic. Almost all the main characters are female, yet the plot lines are not all stereotypical girly-girly things. (My 4-year-old son likes it almost as much as my 5-year-old daughter.) Cupcakes and butterflies are balanced with action and adventure. The ponies are all ...


4

Most of the answers here appear to be about screen time, but it's also important to remember that YouTube is not designed to be a safe space for a child. For example, my son likes to watch Minecraft videos. Very often these have a very unsuitable adult voiceover, plus optional heavy metal soundtrack. Do you want some random teenager swearing and talking ...


3

Play with your kid, read good book for him, talk with him, teach him! The first thing we did while planning kids - we've thrown TV away. At all. We don't have a similar device at home. My daughter (5 yrs now) watches cartoons and programs that I choose for 15-30 minutes per day WITH ME on the screen using my laptop and projector. We speak about what we are ...


3

In this particular instance, Irene Adler only appears in two of the episodes (according to imdb), although she is mentioned more often, and if I remember correctly, only "A Scandal in Belgravia" (season 2 episode 1) had a lot of objectionable content (you can review to make sure). Personally, I would allow her to watch the other episodes, and just skip that ...


2

We've found that giving the kids a 5 and 2 minute warning whenever the activity is changing helps make the transition much smoother. Doesn't matter if we are talking about swimming, playing outside, games or any number of other activities they just seem to be able to let go much easier when they know the change is imminent. For TV, we either allow them to ...


2

Here is my revised answer to your question: Without conducting a study of my own or writing a post-graduate level research paper on the topic, it is hard to answer the questions you have asked. As a parent who got fed up with her children's heroin-like addiction to the zombifying effects of television and promptly cancelled our cable TV subscription, I am ...


2

Acknowledge her desire to watch it. Talk to her about why she wants to watch it - what is it about the series that she wants to see so much. Then tell her that it is not for her age range. In the UK it is shown "after the watershed" - after 9pm - which means it is for adults, with adult themes and language. (Dr Who is shown at about 6:30pm for example). ...


2

The official recommendation from the American Academy of Pediatrics is: Limit entertainment screen time to less than one or two hours per day; in children under 2, discourage screen media exposure. "Entertainment screen time" is computers, tablets, phones, TV, etc. From: ...


2

I'm not familiar with that particular series, but our 5 and 7 year-olds watch a wide variety of science and history shows intended for all ages. A lot of it goes over their heads, but they generally enjoy them and ask good questions that show a certain understanding. For example, we recently watched an adult-targeted documentary on the atomic bombs at ...


2

First off, I want to clarify that I'm not 100% sure how to pick a show that doesn't have gender stereotypes, if the "hero" of the show can't be a certain gender. In the question, it was outline that "Super Why" was not a good fit, because the hero is a male and the sidekicks are female. Thus, I'm assuming that a show with a female hero and male sidekicks is ...


1

It's a bit early for a 1 year old (early for my 2 year old, too), but I think Peg + Cat from PBS kids is great. The lead is female, and it's all about math. My son loves it, even though the math concepts are beyond his reach. I'd say many of the shows on PBS kids (you can find it on the web and on misc portable devices + streaming boxes) keep away from ...


1

Peppa Pig is definitely a strong female character :) She is always showing Daddy Pig who's boss. You can watch these on YouTube (usually some adverts though). It's based on very simple, normal, every day life situations such as going on picnics or going to the supermarket. There are a variety of "grown up" characters that are both male and female and have ...


1

Bubble Guppies: six half-human, half-guppies, each with own characteristics, go to a school and learn about things. No special characteristics (gender, skin color, hair color etc.) is even mentioned, and all have different roles in each episode.


1

Yes, may be teenagers or pre teens would be more appropriate. But, I dont blame your daughter as even I dont like it & find it not so interesting. I think other than the age and maturity, even the child's preferences, liking and attitude plays a pivotal role.


1

Is looking at a computer monitor the same as viewing the TV? Depends on what is on the computer monitor. What about Participating in games on the computer or on a gaming system? This is more active than the passive act of watching TV, so marginally better for the gray matter--though note that plenty of games are 'barely' active. How about ...


1

The particular episode of Sherlock you are concerned about also alludes to lesbian intercourse, which might raise more questions than a dominatrix, and features male and female nudity, with a central narrative of blackmail using explicit images. I image I'd feel uncomfortable watching it with a daughter, but I've watched it with my 8yo son and he just dealt ...


1

It doesn't sound too serious so do consider if you want to press the issue. If you do, try a couple of things. Let her stay over at friends. Make sure they know beforehand not to give in on the TV-demand. "Sorry dear, that's not how we do things in this house!". See how she fares. This will tell you if it's a physical necessity or behaviour that she can ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible