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55

For a different perspective: When I was in grade school, I had a friend that didn't have any type of TV service at home (they did have dial-up internet, but certainly no Netflix). I was completely unaware of this fact for a long time, until the first time I went to his house. There was a TV in the living room, but it was only used to watch home videos, and ...


23

I have 3 daughters 7, 5, 3 years old. I didn't allow TV till 1 year ago when I was talked first into babysitting a large plasma while its' owner leaves the country for a year or two. Then it didn't take much to hook it up. I spend 1 hour in the last 6 months watching it. My daughters however deteriorated. Without TV it was possible to engage them, the two ...


21

No scientific, but anecdotal answer: We don't have a cable either and are in a very similar situation – IT pros with fast Internet. Our kids are 6 and 9. Both go to school / preschool and interact with other kids. While there will always be a group of kids that has seen everything that was on TV (square babysitter, you know...), others won't because their ...


17

Whether children get picked on has much less to do with the thing they are picked on for and much more to do with their social skills and general social standing. If your children asks to see something specific, make it available to them if it is appropriate for them to see, but concentrate on developing their social interaction skills. As a child I had ...


12

The biggest problem would be, as you state, the children not understanding the language and cultural references of their peers. I've even noticed this myself. I don't watch (or have) a TV, I don't care about or follow sports and I listen to music outside the norm. When I talk to colleagues or other parents, I have effectively nothing to have small talk ...


9

Think about this: Born in 1988, I grew up with very limited access to TV, but full access to a computer in a common area that I sneakily used without permission or supervision. I went to a small private school with about 100 kids per grade until I was 18. The majority of casual conversation at school revolved around what kids had watched on television. ...


7

In my (admittedly anecdotal) experience our children have not experienced any harm from not watching TV, and may have benefitted from not having a TV around. When my then-girlfriend and I moved into our first apartment together we had a TV and had it plugged in - but the only 'person' who watched it was our dog, because we'd turn the TV on to keep him ...


6

I don't think it's bad at all to not have cable or satellite. My wife and I deliberately raised our children (eldest is almost 14, youngest is 9) without broadcast and cable TV. We do of course have a TV and a blu-ray player, and Internet access. Why'd we do it this way? Put simply, there's too much on TV that runs counter to the values we want our children ...


5

It's unlikely your child will suffer negative social consequences due to not having broadcast TV in your home. TV is on the decline. At this point in time, cable/satellite television is not as big of a social influence as it would have been in yours or your husband's time. For instance, a survey found that 1/3rd of "Millennials" don't watch broadcast TV.1 ...


3

This is a cultural thing. It will be differ with different country, different societies, and different families. From the moment I had moved out and lived on my own more than a quarter of a century ago, I have lived without a TV. All my children grew up without a TV, except my oldest for a while, whose mother had one for a few years while they were teens. ...


2

I grew up without TV (I was born in 1978 - not just no cable, my parents did not own a TV at all). It was sometimes annoying to not have TV and know what my peers was talking about, but not a huge deal. I watched some children's shows at my grandmothers. Enough that I was aware of the main characters. Later, in my teens, I watched 90210 at my neighbors ...


1

There are not necessarily any drawbacks to not having TV. All you are really giving up is programmed content. Programmed content makes for a convenient electronic babysitter, but without it, children are not really missing out on anything. All the same content is still readily available on demand online, not to mention free of commercials. Furthermore, ...



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