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55

My opinion and experience is that television provides much more disruption than benefit: My experience is that if the television is on, then everybody is "glued to the screen" or at least thoroughly distracted. This prevents social interaction, and it also prevents you from really appreciating the food you're eating -- potentially leading to eating ...


25

There is sufficient reason, imo, to be concerned. Research findings to date might suggest a correlation between television viewing and developmental problems, but they cannot show causality. Enough, in fact, that the American Academy of Pediatrics has issued a policy statement suggesting that children 2 and older be restricted to no more than 1 to 2 hours ...


22

According to the AAP not until two. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that children under two years of age avoid watching TV entirely. Experts say that babies and young toddlers see television as a confusing array of colors, images and noises. Children under age two won’t understand much of the content they see ...


20

This sounds totally inappropriate and a major warning flag. Both my children have been through numerous childcare centres/kindergartens/ELCs and none of them even had a television. The American Academy of Pediatrics have "that parents should limit the amount of time their infants and toddlers spend in front of any sort of screen and reaffirmed earlier ...


19

A 14 month old will have a short attention span - letting him watch the TV might seem like a pain free solution, but it generally is considered to actually make things worse. What you should do is plan for a lot of engaging activities - almost simultaneously. For example sitting with him on the floor surrounded by a range of different toys which do ...


16

Ask him to write you a list of: things that he likes doing things he would like to do someday things he has seen on television that he would like to learn more about things he would like to do with you alone things he would like to do with his other parent and/or siblings Then see what you can do to help get him the information, tools, and time to do ...


16

In summary, research findings to date might suggest a correlation between television viewing and developmental problems, but they cannot show causality. There is no evidence that television, even educational programming, has any positive effect on children younger than 2 years old. In fact, some studies suggest it may be harmful. According to the above ...


14

Beofett's answer is excellent, but I would like to add a few personal observations which were too long for a comment. Youtube, specifically, can be very hard to control. Our toddler (3.5 years) does get to watch stuff there, but you have to be vigilant. Examples: Looking at toys helicopters, easily browsed to real helicopters, then to some wartime ...


13

Why do you assume that TV is a given? My wife & I don't own one (well, except for the retro TV I use as a monitor for my Atari 2600). When we were growing up, neither of us had a TV in the home until we were older than 10. My suggestion would be to junk your TV, & see how you get along without it. Bored? Learn to play an instrument, read a book, ...


13

Consider your premise for a moment; you are claiming that it is desirable for your children to seek social approval from people who engage in activity you consider mindless and bad. I would change your focus slightly. Teach children that it's okay to be left out of things and that they don't need another's approval to engage in or abstain from an activity. ...


13

Good observations. I see things in sort of the opposite way, so let's compare. I feel that commercials are the evil twin of TV entertainment, especially when they're aimed at kids, especially when they appear between kids' shows. I don't want to indoctrinate consumerism into my kids' heads; there's plenty of opportunity elsewhere. That's one reason why I ...


12

While I definitely agree professional help would be valuable, I would also suggest considering your opportunity to be a role-model to your brother. Spend time with him. Invite him to go with you to do fun things that don't involve the computer. Engage him in loving brotherly conversation, so that he trusts you and becomes more open to share what is going on ...


12

For a professional, dedicated daycare, it is absolutely inappropriate. For in-home daycares, though, it may be difficult to avoid. As Dave mentioned in his answer, the clear recommendation is that there should be no television exposure before the age of two, and after that the amount of television exposure, if any, should be heavily restricted. ...


12

This is perfectly normal and nothing to worry about. Kids that age often like to watch the same movies, read the same books, or play the same games over and over. Part of it is them controlling their environment, and some of it is the fact that they really like those movies, books, games, etc. I'd advise against trying too hard to change that, if you push ...


12

We addressed the "addiction" part of your question previously, but I wanted to talk about the behavior part. First, you shouldn't expect it to be as easy for your five year-old as it is for your nine year-old. Nine year-olds live a lot less "in the moment" compared to five year-olds, have developed more interests, and have learned more coping strategies ...


11

LEGO! There never was any cooler toy :-) It comes in so many varieties that there's something for him regardless if he fancies technics, cartoon robots, pirates, movie heroes, whatever. Plus, if your son insists on computer interaction, then go with LEGO Mindstorm (which lets him build a machine that must be programmed on the computer before it will run). ...


11

NOVA Nature Magic School Bus Mythbusters Anything else educational and promotes learning My son and I watch many of the documentaries that are on Netflix instant. There are many sites online where you can watch documentaries for free. Kids do not need to fill their heads with junk. They need to be built up to learn to respect the knowledge that will help ...


11

Small kids can't process passive media such as TV very well. They get overloaded easily because unless the show is going slowly, their mental processing simply can't keep up with the pace of the show. Because of this, they should be gently exposed to media. In practical terms, that means they'll benefit more from watching the same episode over and over ...


11

On the other hand ... I was making my living as a freelance graphic designer when my children were small (way pre-iPad), and was constantly reading warnings against letting children spend too much time on the computer. I read to them a great deal, and did other activities with them as a "stay-at-home mom." But since I was actually making my living at home, a ...


10

I'm aware that TV should be avoided at all, if possible. You're totally right. The best answer is: None. Just do it-- you won't be sorry. Also, support Screen Free Week this week. We don't have a TV by choice. During meal prep my kids draw a picture read a story help with dinner set the table sing a song play a game make a pretend dinner etc It ...


10

We have a no TV rule during meals when we gather. It is not the only rule around meal gatherings. Proper clothing is required; no bathing suits or dirty clothes allowed. Good manners are expected, including participation in the prayers and conversation. Every one stays at the table until everyone is done. No handheld games or electronic devices, including ...


9

I think you should teach your child when to say they are uncomfortable with something. This is an important thing for them to learn. It means that they can decide for themselves in borderline cases when you have already decided they can watch, but they are not enjoying it. I have the same experience with my son who likes watching animated movies, but will ...


9

I'm not sure kids TV is any more violence than it was 20/30 years ago. Bugs bunny is as insulting as Spongebob. The pink panther is as 'violent' as Adventure Time. The difference is that you're now an adult and just see things differently. And 40/50 years ago it was plenty of 'cowboys and indians' as well. That said, given that your example of what is ...


9

In addition to Rory's answer, which I generally agree to, I had good experiences with the following three strategies: Take part: Our son was far less likely to get tired of a something when he was/is playing with others. Adults can provide some guidance and motivation to stay focussed, although now (3yrs) peers do have a similar effect. Avoid clutter: ...


9

I am a language developmentalist and at 18 months of age I would expect an 18 month old child to have between 6 and 20 words of speech. You have to bear in mind that development does not proceed at the same rate in all children and that 18 months is still very, very young. As long as her understanding of spoken language is improving then that is all that ...


9

This is of course very subjective, but one of the reasons I dislike TV is because of the advertisements. My kid starts asking for everything from snacks that she tries once and never touches again to expensive toys. I also think that finding new shows isn't necessarily an advantage, either. It starts out with just getting to watch one show a day, then she ...


8

In the UK there is a programme on the BBC called Newsround, it has been going for decades, which is news specifically aimed and edited for children. While it can be a little too focused on human interest stories and cuddly animals, it does also try to offer a simplified version of the news. This would be a great sort of introduction - not just the ...


8

I agree you want to be careful on how much tragedy you expose a 5 year old to, especially considering that the amount of coverage tragedies get on televised news programs far outweighs their frequency of occurrence in reality. You don't want your child to think that every hour there are murders, rapes, and other horrors happening in his neighborhood, nor do ...


8

I'm not sure about a consensus, but here are links that summarize research on the effects of television on various aspects of child development. http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/26985.php. The results reported here indicate "negative associations between television viewing before age three years and adverse cognitive outcomes at ages six and ...


7

I can tell you this much. Every historic event that my parents made me watch as a child, I'm glad that they made me do it. So I would recommend that you do take advantage of this opportunity.



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