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9

We started this as soon as he had a few teeth (round about 12 months in our sons case) and found it easier to make it fun, Essentially one of either my wife and I clean our teeth with him, we clean his teeth then let him hold the brush and "attempt" to clean his own too (he hasn't quite got the hang of this bit at 16 months :) ) Once done we ask him to let ...


9

Teeth require brushing. If there are any teeth at all, they need to be brushed. Brushing early on helps get the habit in place - there's no reason to wait with that. Even better, by beginning this early, there's less "risk" from those days where you give up for various reasons.


7

It is possible for a baby to teethe at any age - some babies are born with teeth. The most notable sign is... well, teeth. Do you see swollen gums or little white nubs in her gums? Those would be teeth. Excessive drooling or crying for no reason can be a little hard to identify in a 3-month-old, but you know your baby, so only you can tell what's excessive. ...


5

I've read and seen on T.V., information that says they definitely do not work. The anaesthetic properties in the amber do not come into effect until the amber becomes super heated, and that's not going to happen in your child's mouth! I would also be very concerned about the choking hazard they present, and the risk of strangulation they cause. But ...


5

Yes, three months is in the normal range of development. As pointed our earlier, babies can teethe at any age. My daughter (same age) is also teething. In her case, the signs include: frequent gum licking and finger sucking using the nipple of bottles as a soother when I'm trying to feed her when she's inconsolable and we suspect teething pains, she ...


4

Your description sounds like teething all right, and it fits with the age. Teething can take a long time, and can be invisible for a good part of that time. I've not heard of calcium supplements for teething, but your pediatrician likely has a professional opinion on that. As for foods, you can try giving him something that has a little bit of ...


4

Yes, it's normal. Congrats on the first tooth! :-) Teeth rarely come out in matching pairs, or at regular intervals, or starting with the front ones and then the next and the next. It might take weeks while nothing happens, then one or several will come out in short succession, then possibly a long period of nothing again. It doesn't matter.


4

We started brushing our son's teeth once he got them out, although he was not into it the thought we had was getting him used to it early. Many things kids have can have sugar, or cause decay, so even with baby teeth you still want to have a clean mouth. Problem is whether or not your son will allow you to brush.


4

I have never read anything that said teethers were bad--where did you read that? If you aren't comfortable with using a teether (which, btw, neither of my kids ever showed any interest in), you can try giving your child a cool, damp washcloth to chew on. Our daughter preferred this, but she will also chew on her fingers if nothing else is handy. My ...


3

Are you giving your baby iron or mineral supplements? It may be deposition from that: Medication use. Infant medications containing iron, such as supplemental vitamins, may cause dark stains on baby teeth. Taking the antibiotic tetracycline during pregnancy can cause a child to have discolored baby teeth, too. If you're very concerned, take him to a ...


3

Like Torben's said, it definitely sounds like teething. Unfortunately, there's no way to 'speed' it up - until the teeth bud and erupt, your son is going to drool, gnaw and put anything he can in his mouth to alleviate the itching/burning sensation in there. I've also never heard of calcium supplements for teething, and would also recommend a talk with ...


3

A lot of people recommend cold carrots, but the problem with carrots is that the baby can break a piece off that is just the right size to choke him. If you try carrots, you should watch carefully, and preferably only allow him to gnaw on the fat end where he is only likely to get scrapings rather than chunks. It is difficult to come up with a "natural" ...


3

3 months is on the early side but not too early. WebMD has a good description of teething here. My baby will be very fussy, refuse food, prefer her bottle/sippie over solids, not sleep well, will randomly have sudden bursts of severe crying out of nowhere, make weird faces and work her jaw a bit from time to time, drool a lot and chew on things pretty ...


3

A simple Google search will return most everything you want to know on the first result page. From an article on the website whattoexpect.com: Drooling. You might find that your baby's shirts are suddenly soggy. Fasten on a bib to keep her more comfortable (and cleaner), and gently wipe her chin throughout the day to stave off chapping (if that ...


2

It is really important to start brushing babies teeth (and gums!) as early as possible to fight bacteria that can build up. Using Spiffies baby tooth wipes can help make it a little easier and safer when they are still young: Spiffies Infant Tooth Wipes


2

This is not medical advice, I am not a doctor. Children from 6 months to 5 years might need a supplement of vitamins A, C, and D. http://www.nhs.uk/Planners/birthtofive/Pages/Vitamins.aspx Vitamin D helps with calcium absorption. Here's a document that gives recommended daily amounts for calcium (in different age ranges) and then gives a list of ...


2

We had a similar problem and it took a long time to go away. Firstly, consult a doctor. Our doctor suggested the anti-fungal cream Daktarin, but a type without hydrocortisone. Secondly, we made sure her bum was always clean and dry after peeing and pooping. Thirdly, we made sure she had as much time as possible without a nappy on, even though this was risky ...


2

I know you said you wanted something edible but how about a frozen, clean washcloth? My kids LOVED this. I'd wet it, tie it in a knot, and freeze it. Not totally, just until it was stiff. They'd gnaw on it for hours. The thought of fabric in my mouth gives me the willies, truthfully, but as long as they r happy (and safe) I'm happy. I also used to give them ...


2

You could blend a fruit puree into an ice cube tray, freeze them, then put them in the fruit mesh bags like these. You would have control over the recipe and the mesh bag would prevent the baby from getting more than they can handle. This would be messier especially now that it's not a whole fruit and actually a dripping ice cube. ...


1

As per the recommendation of the other answer by Mary , we tried crackers(biscuit) as teethers and it worked quite well since if some piece broke while gnawing then it instantly disintegrated with the infant saliva. Also carrots worked well but we had to monitor it. Also our baby loves to gnaw a ripe jackfruit bulb. It seems to be the closest teether ...


1

So on the next day I checked the tooth and there was no black/blue color on it. Gum was bright red color and tooth was barely noticeable. An it was ok color. Doctor said it was a little hematoma there. Either my baby bumped into something, or the tooth while growing touched some capillary in the gum.


1

Unless he could have a severe calcium or vitamin deficiency (quite unlikely in industrialized countries, and you'd likely notice other effects), I wouldn't worry about it. Tooth eruption is highly variable. For instance, my son got his first eight teeth within one month of each other; on average it takes five.


1

While teething is absolutely a possibility as are a number of things (including just a developmental change or difficulty with self-soothing), I wanted to throw this one in the mix. Apparently, this answer is rarely the solution, but when it is the solution things change very quickly. My sister had the same problem and wondered if it was a problem with ...


1

Six months is the age when babies realize that they can influence you. If you give them attention the minute they start crying in the middle of the night, they quickly learn -- once past the six-months mark -- that this is a pattern, and they will use it. One technique is to wait at least five minutes before going over. It of course depends on the cry; you ...


1

Wiping the gums with a bit of gauze before teeth have even popped out is recommended by my hygienist because bacteria can build up on the gums. It also gets them used to the sensation of having something in their mouth right away making brushing easier later. She says they make tools for this task, but they need disinfecting right away if you buy the tool. ...


1

You should start brushing as soon as teeth appear. Allowing the child to play with the brush before teeth appear will help when you need to actually brush. Use a special childs toothbrush. They have very soft bristles and tiny heads. Use special childs toothpaste. This has less fluoride (you should use a fluoride toothpaste) and a gentle flavour. UK ...


1

Teething is a process and a child may be "teething" for months before teeth actually emerge. A child's behavior may truly be reflecting teething discomfort and be read as a "false alarm" because the tooth is forming and remains below the gum. The answers above thoroughly cover the symptoms and these apply whether teeth are seen promptly or not.


1

It can be hard to tell for sure because the typical signs can also be happening incidentally - like increased drooling, and/or more crying for no apparent reason. Our son showed those signs that early too but didn't start teething until much later, so those signs were a false alarm. But when he did start teething, those signs reappeared. There are ...



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