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20

You should only let the child pull it out themselves (or leave it to fall out when it is ready if the child doesn't want to pull it). If you try to pull it out you may cause pain or injury to the child. Edit to add: letting it fall out by itself is fine - what would be bad about that? The more ready it is, the less pain and bleeding there will be.


15

Here's what my son's dentist told me: Bruxism (teeth grinding, also a great Scrabble word) is very common in children, and nothing to worry about unless it continues after adult molars start coming in. They don't have their baby teeth around long enough for it to turn into a huge problem, and most stop when grown-up molars (which aren't as flat as baby ...


9

We started this as soon as he had a few teeth (round about 12 months in our sons case) and found it easier to make it fun, Essentially one of either my wife and I clean our teeth with him, we clean his teeth then let him hold the brush and "attempt" to clean his own too (he hasn't quite got the hang of this bit at 16 months :) ) Once done we ask him to let ...


9

Teeth require brushing. If there are any teeth at all, they need to be brushed. Brushing early on helps get the habit in place - there's no reason to wait with that. Even better, by beginning this early, there's less "risk" from those days where you give up for various reasons.


8

I had a problem with grinding my teeth when I was young. It led to a lot of dental work in later years, which could have been avoided with a little bit of behavioral modification. If your child is grinding his teeth in his sleep, he's probably also grinding his teeth while awake. You may not notice it, because while sleeping, you tend to do it louder ...


7

Our dentist recommends that brushing starts as soon as solid food is introduced. There are two types of baby toothbrushes: those that you slip over a finger (better for when they don't have teeth, 'cause they're ideal for gums) and specially-sized infant toothbrushes with handles appropriately designed for small hands to grip. There's also infant ...


6

No, the characteristics of milk teeth don't predict much about the adult teeth. Disclaimer: I have no dentistry education; this is my personal experience and beliefs. Milk teeth are smaller because they start out in a toddler's jaw so by the time the child is six, they'll have some gaps between them. These gaps disappear because adult teeth are bigger. The ...


5

I think what you mention is some kind of dental brace (Google search result) and I edited your question a little. I'm not a dentist, but these things are shaped that way for a reason. It follows that its components are all necessary, or else they wouldn't be there. After all, this is not a toy or a gadget that would benefit from any artistic additions. ...


4

I have never read anything that said teethers were bad--where did you read that? If you aren't comfortable with using a teether (which, btw, neither of my kids ever showed any interest in), you can try giving your child a cool, damp washcloth to chew on. Our daughter preferred this, but she will also chew on her fingers if nothing else is handy. My ...


4

We started brushing our son's teeth once he got them out, although he was not into it the thought we had was getting him used to it early. Many things kids have can have sugar, or cause decay, so even with baby teeth you still want to have a clean mouth. Problem is whether or not your son will allow you to brush.


4

Toddlers like to do what their parents do. So when it is time to brush the baby's teeth, also brush your own. Put toothpaste on her brush, give it to her, and get to work with your own brush on your own mouth. Show the gestures you are making. Encourage her to do just as you are doing - exaggerate your movements as you do the back, the front, the back on ...


3

Usually around age 6, but this varies a lot per children. According to this article from the Baby Center (often very helfup and reliable website), it can vary between age 4 and 7: http://www.babycenter.com/0_losing-baby-teeth-what-to-expect-and-when_3658971.bc


2

It is really important to start brushing babies teeth (and gums!) as early as possible to fight bacteria that can build up. Using Spiffies baby tooth wipes can help make it a little easier and safer when they are still young: Spiffies Infant Tooth Wipes


2

I have always encouraged my kids to wiggle their teeth as much as they can once they become loose. And once they get really loose, they have come up with various ways to speed them on their way, from chewing toffee or apples, through to pliers or string. This is as a direct result of my eldest accidentally swallowing one in his sleep and finding its passage ...


1

I would be inclined to think that if he just got two new first adult teeth in they are quite sharp, and causing minor discomfort which gnawing relieves to some degree. It's easy to forget exactly how incredibly sharp brand new teeth that just broke through the gums are, before they've had time to become dulled through eating and other ordinary activities. ...


1

If you are able to wiggle it back and forth pretty far it's good to go. however, let your kid work on it. I usually waited and pushed it back and forth to provide tearing in the gums from the tooth root until an edge became unhooked. Then I would get floss and tie a loop hooking it onto the exposed edge and then either have my dad or myself pull it out ...


1

Wiping the gums with a bit of gauze before teeth have even popped out is recommended by my hygienist because bacteria can build up on the gums. It also gets them used to the sensation of having something in their mouth right away making brushing easier later. She says they make tools for this task, but they need disinfecting right away if you buy the tool. ...


1

You should start brushing as soon as teeth appear. Allowing the child to play with the brush before teeth appear will help when you need to actually brush. Use a special childs toothbrush. They have very soft bristles and tiny heads. Use special childs toothpaste. This has less fluoride (you should use a fluoride toothpaste) and a gentle flavour. UK ...



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