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3

If things have been going as you say then I'd suggest you don't 'tell' her anything - she's 14 and old enough to start having some input into her life so why not ask her? Just summarise the situation between you and her as you see it which is that she has had problems and got into trouble back home etc. but since coming to stay with you see that she is ...


0

First I have to say I laughed at what you called him, but in all seriousness. My brother is exactly like this. He's 19 now (I'm 17) and you can only imagine what I went through growing up with him. Here my advice, offer him a reward and mention it first. like 'I'll give you a cookie if you do the dishes, and two if it's looks wonderful.' Now I know I may ...


2

It sounds like your son has reached an age where it is necessary to change from expecting him to accept being told what to do or how to behave and transition to a model of helping him figure out his own path. It also seems like it would be useful to find a way to connect and have some shared issues that can be used as a base to work from. For example, as ...


1

I remember I was somewhat like your son when I was 15 years old. I used to get good grades and all of a sudden I started failing subjects. This continued until I was 23 years old. Then I went back to Uni and completed my graduation. I realized in the later years, that I wasn't an inch bit interested in studies. and that's why I failed in all the subjects ...


1

I can relate! I currently have a pre-teen. During your 11yo's absence, perhaps you could write friendly, chatty letters to your child during his absence (stamp or email) to keep the connection. Here are some ideas for reducing the stress, and improving your relationship: cultivate common interests. get involved in some activities that involve other ...


3

In your state, you are legally responsible for the care and well-being of your daughter until the age of 18, and have legal control over them. CIVIL PRACTICE AND REMEDIES CODE TITLE 6. MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS CHAPTER 129. AGE OF MAJORITY Sec. 129.001. AGE OF MAJORITY. The age of majority in this state is 18 years. However, the age of ...


0

It can be hard to follow and keep up with university's studies and a work at the same time. Stastistics show that students with a job are far more likely to drop or fail than students that do not need to work for a living. A middle ground would maybe to tell your son to work during the vacations, after the exams and before the next school year. During ...


0

If your kid is having a temper tantrum then it means that your kid (12 and up) completely acknowledges what they are doing. Here are the steps you need to take. DO NOT TELL THEM TO CALM DOWN Get them in a room where they can't hurt anybody including themselves. Stay with them Do not let them have power over you. If they get physical with you, you get ...


0

Making our teen daughter watch documentaries showcasing other peoples hardship, tragedies and/or lifestyle helped my daughter stop cutting. Also I was able to share my experiences with attempted suicide. This seemed to also be important. They need to see a larger world than the one they get from American pop culture. "On the way to School" is a good one ...


3

In addition to the other answers I want to recommend you to get counseling for yourself and your husband too. As a person with mental issues I experienced that my problems were hard to accept/understand for my mother and the people around me. They didn't know how to handle me and they hurt me without noticing (and how could they know). The problem is that ...


3

In addition to some of the good ideas already offered it occurs to me that there could be something wrong or damaging going on in her life that is not visible to you. In any case, if there is something that she is unable to deal with and unable to share there will be no amount of grounding and punishment that will make things better. Perhaps switch things ...


-2

Instead of grounding her, why not start following her around or have a kid in the neighborhood keeping an eye out what she is really doing when cutting school. Or find a mentor for her someone she can look up too and not share their private conversations with you, because to a kid trust is very important, and when kids can confide in someone in their life ...


4

The best thing to do is what's best for your daughter. At minimum, this question is complicated, and so the best situation for your family may not be what's best for any other family. First, take a look at your daughter's life. Is she (a) happy, (b) performing well academically, and (c) getting the recommended medical attention (dental, physicals, ...


1

I am currently 22 years old, unmarried without children. However, I have recently being studying the vedanta, the art of living, and I would like to share observations. My 16-year-old son says the most awful things to me. I feel he is deliberately trying to upset/provoke me constantly. For example, last night at the dinner table he said, "I am not ...


1

Although I can't diagnose someone online from second-hand information, what you've described suggests that your son's girlfriend may be suffering from borderline personality disorder. If so, that'a horrible condition to be living with, and my heart goes out to her. (To people saying it's normal teenage behavior - threatening suicide is not normal for any age ...


2

I'm autistic and I do this too. It's not defiance or satisfaction at provoking the person or anything like that. It's completely involuntary and not associated with happiness at all. My impression is that many autistic people express emotions using different kinds of nonverbal signals than non-autistic people. For example, I once met a kid who showed ...


1

Since you seem to be well off (by British standards) you could do an attic conversion or similar and make a self-contained flat for him. Then he would have to start looking after himself. You could slowly work up to charging the standard rent for your area, expecting him to pay his own bills and so on. Surely if your kid is not working at uni this will ...


0

I try to encourage him to go out with friends, but he consciously refuses to have friends, because it would make me happy to see him with friends. Do not take everything he says at face value. Most likely, he doesn't want to justify his social life to you. I was like him when I was younger. I didn't have good social skills for my age. I was fat and ...



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