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If he is immature and has no ability to prioritize anything then it seems clear that he is still eligible for being grounded. Does grounding him still work, even temporarily? If you find that grounding works but only for a short time and the cycle repeats every few weeks then consider this a form of discipline and direction. Don't be angry or nag him. Just ...


1

How is you family dealing with ownership within the household? If the shoes were "his," free and clear, then he can do whatever he wants with him. However, if when you bought them for him, there were strings attached (like "these shoes are expensive, but we think you'll do good things with them"), then he did not have the right to give them away without ...


7

With care you can reverse this situation, turn it into a teachable moment, and gain massive respect into the bargain. Recognise that 13 year old boys do really dumb things for girls Really stupid, falling over themselves in circles like a little puppy dog dumb. They can't help it. Make him aware of the problem he has caused If he's a good kid you can ...


1

Ground* him for a week at least, so that he understands that he's being punished for doing something wrong. And have a talk with him about the value of things he owns (and things you buy for him). He's thirteen years old, and while you might think he's 'learned the value of money' over the course of thirteen years, this is not necessarily the case - even ...


6

Make the charity whole Donate the left shoes as well, that way the charity is made whole. Why did they really do it It's possible they found it funny b/c of some teens' snark sense of humor to have the charity looking for matching shoes, only not to find them, as a previous answer has said. As a parent, it's hard to know if that was the root of the ...


3

I would learn him to respect the value of money, and have him buy the next pair of shoes from his own pocket. This way, it would only hurt his own pocket if he choose to do the same over again. (Or something likewise)


40

Hehe, that is pretty funny. Eh, don't worry about it. Kids do silly things, this isn't one that's going to get him killed. Sometimes people just need to do something that goes against the normal course of action, ya' know? It'll be a funny story he can think about/tell other people when he's older. After he's had his fun, and then gets tired of walking ...


13

Consider items you give to your child a gift to them. The money spent on it then becomes irrelevant since it isn't yours to use; it's theirs. This makes dealing with kids breaking things much easier as it becomes their own responsibility and you'll feel less reason to keep replacing things they break. They learn value much more quickly that way. If he gives ...


2

Divide 575$ by a reasonable hourly wage and make him work that many hours for charity (for free). Thereafter forget about the incident and the 575$. This will sharpen his mind for the problems of the not so lucky, and he might consider thinking a bit more about any future actions. For yourself: be happy about the lesson learned.


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I would be more concerned that he thought it was funny to make fun of the disadvantaged. Donate the left shoes to the charity. Then buy him a cheap pair of shoes, if he wants expensive fancy shoes he can save up for them so he will learn the value of shoes and will respect gifts from you.


2

Let him live with the consequences of his actions and walk around with one shoe. If he has a job or an allowance, he will quickly learn just how valuable a pair of shoes are after spending a few days with only one.


40

First off, I strongly recommend taking the money out of your thinking. Teenagers can do foolish things that can be expensive, but it just doesn't help to dwell on the cost of the shoes. Remember: your son is worth a lot more to you than those shoes. Presumably it will be possible to speak with someone at the donation center to get those shoes back. Second, ...


88

Donate the left shoes in the same donation box. Whether or not they are able to get single shoes to those who need them, having a half-pair sit in your son's closet does nobody any good. Might as well finish what he started. By only giving right shoes, he has potentially wasted the charity's time: many people need only one shoe, but there's a chance this ...


0

I am a girl who came from an abusive house hold during this same age. I also have several sisters from a healthier household (I was adopted by other family). I also have a half brother in this age group. So I feel like Ive been in this situation in several ways and what I'm going to tell you may shock you. This is perfectly normal teenage behavior. Its ...


4

she thinks that he is cool because he makes a lot of money off it Most likely, he's spinning yarns about the money in drug dealing and she's falling for it because she watches too much TV. Studies indicate that low-level drug dealers make $20k-$30k per year. While that's a lot for a 17-year-old, it is not very much money at all by adult standards; ...


2

This is very definitely a codependent relationship, if he so strenuously resists when his contact with her is restricted. Time to get a therapist involved. If he needs some kind of incentive to go, explain to him that his girlfriend is in danger and that she needs help. But no matter how much he wants to, he has no training. Help him think about all the ...


1

My eleven year old was getting to the point that I would consider him addicted. He was either on the computer playing an online game or he was watching TV, which I considered even worse. At least there's some brain activity required for online gaming. If we asked him to do things (get ready for bed, bring your clothes down to be washed, come down to eat ...


13

There isn't much you can do to force a change in their relationship. You can establish curfews, household rules, and so on, but unless you plan to watch her every minute of every day, she'll find a way to break a rule that you put in place. While she is certainly not an adult yet, your daughter's old enough to make some decisions on her own. The best way ...


5

Is there anything you can do? Not really. I'd say talk to your daughter and make it clear that you know what she's doing, you're not happy about it then go onto making sure she stays protected while having sex. It's probable this will just end in time and then you'll be there to console your daughter however, you could talk to her and suggest that she ...


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You could tell her that she thinks her boyfriend is cool, but he really is not because he ruins lives. That might stop her. You could additionally forbid her to see him, but I'm not sure that will stop her. Basically go over to your daughter and tell her that he boyfriend is a bad person. Or go over to him and say: You're a mean person


-2

I had come across this article hope this can help you out. http://www.wikihow.com/Avoid-Video-Game-Addiction


1

The first step of getting out of any addiction is accepting the fact of being addicted. That's the hardest part. And it's behind him, apparently. Second step: get clean. In this case - make him not play at all. For, say, a week. How to help to complete this phase? provide alternative occupation - painting the fence, going to the movies, a family board ...


4

The first thing is to find out why the child plays. As a pretty heavy gamer myself who has gone through a number of phases and reasons for getting lost in games, I know there can be many reasons why you get lost in a world of games. Once you know, here's some advice for three different kinds of players that I've been in the past: For the challenge When in ...


0

I have had three generations go through this. Take heart, it doesn't necessarily last forever. I, myself, have never been fond of video games, but I'm not against them because Final Fantasy 7 is the main reason my daughter learned to read. She wanted to play so bad she taught herself to read through the game. In any case, I have noticed that with all of ...


6

There are several people here who should be involved, and there are two people to consider whose lives are being impacted in an unhealthy manner. I think there needs to be some adult intervention here. The girl's parents absolutely need to be informed Whatever the true intent behind the girl's suicidal expressions, they are still suicidal expressions. The ...


5

I don't recommend you try to discuss this when she is in the throes of a problem. He will not listen to reason at that time. Instead, when things are calm in the middle of the day, walk him through the logic of the situation. Ask him questions. Your use of the phrase "drama queen" suggests that your questions might be along the lines of "was she really in ...


0

Plenty of good answers here, but I didn't see this mentioned, so I'll add: A lot of people of all ages (with or without other disabilities) have a hard time keeping track of what their real priorities are or should be. Obviously teenagers are often more vulnerable to this, but it really is quite common. They can get into a "tunnel vision" mindset that ...


0

Counseling as well as behavior therapy would help a lot with the anxiety. The therapist should be working on coping skills especially as it relates to transition times from preferred activity. Make a schedule and make her stick to it. Make a time for everything including leisure activities. It will be a fight and her behaviors will increase but it will get ...


4

If you can afford counseling, that might be a good idea. Be sure to find someone with experience with transgender and gay issues. It sounds to me as if your child is having anxieties due to gender and disability issues (something (s)he can't control) and is transferring to something (s)he can control. It will be important to find a place where (s)he can ...


1

It kind of sounds like your child might feel a bit out of control and needs a bit of help forming structure around their life. Something you can do is to sit down with them and discuss solid achievable goals. They need to differentiate between achievable and useless goals. Tell them that having goals, such as being "not good enough", aren't achievable and ...


1

You are trying to go in at the deep end with the internal scissors. Start out simpler: Ask them to think about something they would only tell their very best friend about. Then have them imagine everyone knowing all of a sudden. Because that is, an a way, what is happening: you are mailing or IM'ing your best friend, and some person you don't even know can ...


-2

I want to present an audience, consisting of mostly teens and pre-teens, the problems of a surveillance state, [...]. That leads to an internal scissor in your head, i.e. you forget words and therefore actions if you are not allowed to use them, and it changes your thinking. When I Google "internal scissor", I don't get any relevant articles. Are you ...


0

Teenagers, even ones who appear to waste their lives on social media, cannot possibly have an absolute lack of interests. And while I am only reluctantly admitting this, social media in itself is a profession, and in these days it is becoming more integral and valuable. I strongly dislike social media for a huge number of reasons but it is undeniable that ...


1

I know it sounds simple, but have you tried just explaining to them why you want them to take shorter showers? It's not guaranteed to work, but for some teenagers, giving a reason for a rule is better than giving the actual rule - knowing that hot water is limited, that everyone else's time needs to be accounted for, and that their own limited time is ...



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