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23

I will answer this from the point of view of, once upon a time, the child in this situation. I don't know if any of this applies to your friend's child as I don't know him, but perhaps it will for others in a similar situation if nothing else. I was the 'perfect' student as a child; always the teacher's pet, always the top of the class, always wanting ...


19

I want to begin by tempering my answering by saying that I quite literally saw red when I read that alphabetizing is not important because we do not use dictionaries, we just use the internet. As a Library Media Specialist, one of the greatest weaknesses I see day in and day out is that students have no idea how to alphabetize. They are literally unable to ...


17

Listen and sympathize with the child. "Oh dear. That doesn't sound good. I bet you felt bad afterwards". Then discuss the situation. Ask why the child thinks the teacher did that, what the child can do in future. This is supportive and encouraging the child to develp their own strategies. You can mention the fact that sometimes people make mistakes. You ...


16

I definitely agree that research is needed. First, speak to the teacher. Talk to her about her teaching style, but at this point in the year it is a bit late, so maybe speak to her about why SHE thinks your child does not like school. The answer should be very telling. Second, speak to other parents. Don't accuse the teacher, just talk about whether ...


11

During parent-teacher conferences, the teacher has only 20 minutes to go through everything the school requires them to cover (grades, milestones, whatever) and there's usually little or no time left for meaningful communication. One can only stretch the time so much before destroying the schedule (which parents make the effort to arrive for), so the ...


9

It sounds like your concern is about a teacher mixing opinion with the teaching material. If the teacher is presenting an opinion you disagree with, then you can raise the issue with them directly. I would suggest starting off by saying whether or not your agree with their opinion is not the issue, but rather that you are concerned that the opinion ...


9

I would address the accuracy of the name calling first. Was he shushing the noisy people, or announcing loudly that they should shush in order to get a teacher's attention? What was his true motivation? If it was simply to tell them what is right, I would say something like "the teacher was mistaken (it happens) and thought you were trying to get them in ...


7

Sergio and Dave BOTH have good answers for general activities, but if you are simply looking for a signal to get them to quite down and look at you for transitioning to the next activity there are a number of things to try depending on the specifics of the situation. You have to teach them it will be a signal and then use it pretty often first, but there ...


7

This is something Alice (who is quite a bit younger), as well as a number of students (who were also, mostly middle school students) I have had have struggled with. Let me preface this by saying, I know Beofett is asking with a friend in mind, I am going to write this as if I am speaking directly to the parent just for the sake of simplicity. Kids do ...


6

Hmmm, tough one. It is difficult to arrive to any well founded conclusions without a lot more research and evidence. And I must note for start, that it is possible to keep control of 20 or even more children without any bad methods. It takes a lot of energy, a lot of experience, and time, however. And it is not always strict. A good teacher knows when to ...


6

As DA01 mentioned above, public education will generally not please every parent, 100% of the time. If your concern is about teaching material you think is incorrect, then the advice present in this question will likely be applicable to some extent. However, in this case, you seem to be objecting to just how important a particular skill is to learn. In ...


6

Teach your children to think critically about what they are taught This way it will matter less what they are taught at school. You can present your view at home, and they can make a logical decision on which they accept. Of course this has the downside (if you consider it a downside, I personally do not) that your child will also begin to question what you ...


6

Here's one blog where a parent discusses his child's dissatisfaction with a teacher's approach to science lessons, and how he (the parent) dealt with that. http://parentingbeyondbelief.com/blog/?p=4504 (I got that link from this answer: How do you handle a teacher that teaches pseudo science? ) It's not a great fit, because the teacher was in the wrong ...


6

Kids are very good at putting their own spin on the situation and I feel there are a few things that seem out of place... One of the things children need to learn is when it is appropriate to help and what help is appropriate. As someone who deals with a large group of children regularly myself I can tell you the noise of one or more children trying to 'be ...


5

If you truly want to know what is going on in the classroom for any grade, you have to be there, and not just once or twice. Volunteer to help with something like preparing materials or even reading to the children. Be sure not to interfere and don't go just to spy. It is very eye-opening to see the children as the teacher sees them and sometimes as the ...


5

Getting the "right" teacher has be important. I remember reading a study (NYTimes but couldn't find it to cite) showing that a poor teacher will cover 6 months of work in a year but a great teacher will cover 18 month's work. Generally, we will ask around the school to get an idea of who the good teachers are. Our experience has been: A teachers bad ...


4

At the age of 3, I would have thought the things of most interest would be: The child's social skills. At 3yo, many children still do side-by-side rather than interactive playing The child's verbal skills. Are they clearly understandable? the child's emotional maturity. How do they handle the day once they've been dropped off. How do they handle conflict ...


4

I am not sure this is so much an answer as insight. I am a teacher and a librarian. I have taught every level in every socioeconomic category. I have found time and again that the child's interaction absolutely reflects the parent's interaction with teachers. This is actually a major topic of discussion among the teaching profession. In the past 11 years I ...


4

Some loose suggestions: make sports or let them play in the playground. If they are physically tired they will be more calm in the class room. make it fun, find out what they like & let them take part in decisions but still be very keen of who takes the last decision. use their hands. 4 year olds like to create, let them use their hands to paint, ...


4

In addition to Sergio's answer: Have frequent breaks. A four year old's concentration span is very limited. Read the situation, if the kids are getting bored then change your approach. Incorporate movement between lessons. Kids who have trouble concentrating should be at the front of the class so you can engage them. Try to keep the class quiet when they ...


3

This varies from county to county within states, and even from school to school within school districts. One of the most successful schools in the state I used to teach in purposely tracked kids once they left kindergarten and grouped them according to their academic performance. Children who needed extra help, while they were moved forward, were placed in ...


3

You can always home school your children. Then you have total control of everything they learn or don't learn. It is honestly your only option to control their education in totality.


3

Taking the whole account with a grain of salt, that is, assuming what you have related to be generally accurate, I have an opinion which is only that, an opinion from experience raising wonderfully successful children. here are the relevant factors: A child's responsibility while in school is to learn what he's taught and to interact with others according ...


2

Communication. Plan and simple, teach your kids to communicate with their teachers about issues and questions they have, rather than wait and let things escalate. If they can't raise questions or concerns about school work then they might fail for simple reasons, or they might fail for doing the wrong thing. Other than that, they can manage to have a ...


2

HedgeMage's answer is a good place to start with any teacher relationship, but the other thing is to know exactly what your objective is before going in. If you just want something a little more specific about your kid, this might not be the time to get it. If you suspect there is something more to know that you are not getting told, you might ask ...


2

This is a very important and critical topic. It questions the education philosophy. The topic is about the definition of a "teacher". Is the teacher a facilitator helping the students read a book? Or the teacher is an educated thinker providing students with deeper understanding of the world? How much freedom should a teacher has to convey knowledge to the ...


2

Volunteer in the classrooms. Teachers love (and need) volunteers.


2

The teacher and the school have the authority to select teaching styles. Parents should be able to propose a different style. The proposed style may be for one specific student or for the class. Depending on the relationship between the parent and the teacher, the approach may be formal or informal. Please remember that the relationship with the teachers ...


2

There are a few things going on here, and a lot of it has to do with rules and intention. If no one was being hurt by the activities of the other children, then the idea that he will learn to "pretend not to notice when he sees someone who needs help" simply by being called a tattletale is absurd. Further, if the teacher is right there, giving ...


2

The parents need to get the most honest story out of the kid as possible. (It sounds like we might be getting dad's version of mom's version of kid's version of what happened.) What was described wasn't tattling; it was dealing with his peers. It's possible the teacher just spoke wrong (and really meant, "Calm down" or "Mind your own business"), but it's ...



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