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17

I doubt you'll find anything approaching a firm and accurate answer. This depends so much on the surroundings, particular child, etc. For a general guideline, Mayo Clinic suggests that a child is likely to Say a few words by 12 months Say 8 to 10 words by 18 months Use simple phrases and know 50 words by 24 months They also offer some advice for aiding ...


16

According to this article, by the time your child is 18 months old, he/she should have a vocabulary of about 20 words, and a vocabulary of 50 words by the time he/she is 2. However.... THIS article from the Mayo Clinic says that, really, by the end of 18 months (so closer to 19 months, really) your child may only say 8-10 words and that this is ...


15

There's been no research that I know of connecting early sign language learning to speaking sooner or better in general. However, learning sign language can make a huge difference in diagnosing speech disorders early enough to treat aggressively and successfully. By age 3, my son couldn't even say "mama" or "papa". After checking his hearing, oral muscle ...


13

Don't expect anything. Having 5 kids, I'm well on my way towards having my own statistical sample. :-) 15 yo boy - started saying words at 1 year, could speak well before 2. 5 yo boy - pretty much only grunted and pointed at things until over 2 yo then started talking in near perfect sentences. He is now an eloquent speaker in 2 languages. 3.5 yo boy - ...


11

There are possible physical reasons for a child to have delayed speech. I'm going to assume you've already discussed these possibilities with the pediatrician. Barring physical reasons for delayed speech and other learning/behavioral/social disorders, it is completely possible he is just a late speaker. In fact it isn't uncommon for a child of this age ...


8

According to http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AA67/AA67.htm about 15% of 8th graders binge drink on a regular basis so 9 years is probably not a good age to start. Whether you like it or not, your child will be exposed to alcohol first probably in middle school Besides the age, you need to be also clear about what exactly you want to teach to him. The ...


7

My question would be how much of a social outlet does he have outside of your family? If you're unable to provide him with the attention he needs and still provide his sister with the care she needs, then finding ways for him to get that attention elsewhere, either from childcare or simply from a good nursery could be a solution. The other thing I'd think ...


7

Children who are independent, shy, introverted, or a combination of those things can sometimes be difficult for teachers to assess. My son was initially VERY introverted when we first enrolled him at his current school. He didn't play or interact with the other children much. It's taken almost 2 years, but he's a completely different kid now. Some of ...


7

We though our son could hear perfectly too. We could communicate effectively with him, he seemed to hear us from across the room and seemed to have no problems. When he started childcare, we found that he did not learn as much as we'd expected from the group environment and would often ignore the kindergarten teachers. By chance, a doctor mentioned to us ...


6

As with many topics, I would not force it upon him but rather wait for a suitable situation to present itself. I don't think there's a "right age" for this talk, or rather that this "age" is not counted in years but in observations and questions. In your case, it might be when he asks you what do you do at work, or simply a situation at home where he ...


6

It is probably different between children, but I will tell you our experience: Before we had our first child, we thought parents who taught their kids "sign language" was weird. We weren't planning on teaching our kids how to sign. When our first child was one year old, we would take her to the library and she would grab some board-books - the ones she ...


5

Children with autism are each very different but communication tends to be difficult for most of them. Getting a child with autism is speak is usually a great challenge even for a trained speech therapist, so know that there is usually no quick fix. Observe carefully your child's communication. Encourage eye contact by holding object he desires near your ...


5

Yes! Research does indicate that hearing children who learn sign language talk more than their same-age peers. Here is a resource for the study. http://deafness.about.com/od/babysigning/f/signspeech.htm The study involved 103 11-month-old hearing babies. The babies were divided between a group learning sign language, and a group that did not learn ...


4

Many four year old's speak incessantly at this age- even when they DO get all the attention. There isn't a lot to be done about it. Having said that, mine was the same way and here is what we did to help us adults maintain our sanity amongst it all: Make sure he gets social time with friends - for us that was time in theater classes and plays. Try to get ...


4

That's early compared to my children - both of mine were more like 6 months old before they were really babbling a lot. But it's not unusual, and it's certainly nothing to discourage. She's developing her verbal skills, and learning to express herself. Encourage away - babble back at her, make conversation, and start paying attention to the different ...


4

It's normal, but don't freak out when it goes away! Babies go through an early babbling stage which then stops, and then takes up again in earnest later on. I don't know the exact average timeline, but with my son it was around three months old as well. My parents told me to film him because we'll be sorry when it stops, and indeed, a month or two later he ...


3

We have twins. They are bilingual/trilingual. One verbal and one much less verbal. The verbal twin could say lots of words at 13 months (including vocalizing animal sounds) and at 17 months could do 2-3 word sentences. The non-verbal twin at around 17 months could probably manage mamma and pappa, and vocalized something in what we used to call "martian" ...


3

This one requires consistency and patience, but I encourage you to take him out and expose him to as many different environments as you can. Kids can distinguish different environments and connect to the idea that different environments require different behaviors at a very young age. Many kids your boy's age that are bi and tri-lingual can distinguish who ...


3

It depends on many factors There are all sorts of things that are going to influence the age that your daughter can understand what language is and the mechanics of being able to talk to you. Listening to her parents and understanding them will come before talking, which is why many people investigate 'baby sign' language as an interim step. Some of the ...


3

At this point a speech therapy is your best choice. And don't worry, you are doing good in talking to him a lot. Just be careful of one thing... Don't make him feel any less, or discouraged or don't pressure him to talk. Be very very patient with him. This isn't an easy disorder. He will eventually talk, just be really patient with him and make him ...


3

The UK National health service suggests that at 12-18 months a child: "May start to say words and understand them" The emphasis is mine, with children there is never a standard answer.


3

Just as the others have noted, we too used sign when our kids were small to reduce frustration. Now, that they are older (7&9), we use sign language to give them silent cues (remember thank you!) or ask questions at a distance without drawing attention (hungry? bathroom? ready to go? come here!).


3

While you have sign language, have you tried sign supported speech? My eldest son is hard of hearing. For his first couple of years of school, he went to a special school for children with severe speech and language difficulties. He was one of the few children there with a 'technical' hearing problem; most had problems somewhere on the autistic spectrum. ...


3

I had the same issue with my 4yo boy, he repeated "what's your name" for a week or so. I didn't get angry, but I told him I thought it wasn't funny anymore, and I was mostly ignoring him when he said that. Today he started controlling himself, but still has bursts of mechanical repeating: "what's your...", etc. My opinion: I don't think you do anything ...


2

I was in a similar position, my parents would say that I would point and grunt at things, and they'd get it for me. What they did was to make me ask for something if I wanted it. If I wanted milk, they would make me ask for it, if I only asked for something to drink, they'd get me water. After a bit of time at this, it should encourage them to talk. Good ...


2

Like David said, signing may or may not improve verbal communication. And if you're not careful, you can run into the problems efalcao mentioned. That being said, I think teaching your infant/toddler/child to sign is a wonderful idea. We started with our first child at 6 months (and it wasn't just signing, we also talked and sang to her as much as ...


2

I'm not sure, but I can give you one example where signing hurt us: Our kids first and most-used signs were "please" and "thank you." We'd frequently say "can you say thank you?" and they'd sign it and we'd smirk in our triumph of parenting. ....Well, nowadays (at about 2 years old) they can say a lot of words, but we're unable to get them to actually say ...


2

As someone who is in a very similar situation with our own almost-two-year-old, our pediatrician actually recommended we start in on early intervention speech therapy. It's easier to help early than it is to catch them up later. We just had an evaluation done and they concluded that some form of therapy would be very beneficial. Neither the pediatrician ...


2

Babbling is good! Don't discourage it! :) With my daughter, my wife told me to babble back but always make it a point to slide to normal words. This way the baby eventually 'babbles with sense'. She hated baby talk as it dumbs down the baby. Basically, we encouraged babbling but tried to substitute real words when we have a chance, ie. Da becomes dada ...



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