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34

The appropriate age depends a great deal on the specific style/art in question, the type of dojo, and the particular child. Most Karate dojos I know take kids starting around age 4-6. Most Krav Maga dojos I know won't take anyone under 14-16; some won't take minors at all. My friend's Brazilian Jui-Jitsu dojo only takes kids from age 10, but I'm told that ...


33

How about trampolining? It's very similar to gymnastics so he can probably use many of the skills he's picked up there. It involves lots of bouncing up and falling back down again as well as moves which involve falling on the front or back. Also a good variation on swimming that might appeal more to his love of falling down is diving. He can do this from ...


27

To me, this sounds like much ado about nothing. Your son needs to learn how to socialize and how to make friends; sounds like he's done that already, so that's not your problem. So what is your problem? The fact that some kids aren't coming to a birthday party? Sounds like a good opportunity for a conversation with your son about the real world. ...


26

I would recommend without hesitation Judo. Not only would he fall often, he would learn to fall properly.


21

I would explain that different skills require certain amount of practice and if she wants to see more action on the field she will need to put in more time to increase her skill level. Don't say it like: 'If you try harder people will pass you the ball'. As this is negative and largely not true. Soccer is about trust and other team members expect that you ...


21

I checked with my girlfriend, who is a baby-wearing consultant, and she says running with a baby in a baby-backpack or sling is a bad idea. Babies do not have the muscular strength to absorb the impact shocks from running and it can cause them serious injury, no matter how tightly you wrap the baby up. While walking long distance is fine and older ...


15

Diving is all about falling with style. If he finds the activities you listed boring, I suspect that he will enjoy the adrenaline rush from the height.


15

If you DO make an issue out of it, what will be the result? Will the other 10 families start to consider everyone else in their priorities and scheduling, or will they apologize and keep right on with what they're doing? It's apparent they feel that having their children participate in soccer is a higher priority than having their children participate in ...


13

One way to handle it is to not say anything negative about her performance at all. A parent telling a child that they are not good at something can be very hurtful. If she has passion, then that's a great thing; encourage it and try to find clever ways to get her to practice without making it seem like it's "boring practice". Have her help coach younger ...


12

That's a tough situation... how to wake her up to a hard truth without discouraging her. But if she's serious about wanting to be really great, I guess the truth is your job here. One possibility is to try to quantify some aspect(s) of performance (something that isn't so subjective she'd just argue them)... passes completed, passes received, defenders ...


12

I think it's important to push your kids. I also think it's important not to push too hard. Balance in all things. Encourage her. Play with her yourself and make sure she enjoys it. When she agrees, then sign her up. Make sure she understands that she'll have to stay with it for at least some period of time -- it's a lot more fun once you've gotten ...


12

It may have a poor cultural connection where ever you are, but no one has yet suggested: skateboarding. Not scootering or some other watered down variation, but the unforgiving plank with wheels. It's creative, very difficult and takes an exceptionally phenomenal amount of physical fitness[1] as well as technicality, balance and precision. Moreover all it ...


11

Speaking as a former teen-aged geek, here's a few things that have worked for (and on me - thanks Mom and Dad! :) ) Organized sports are kinda hit-and-miss for a geek (esp. if it's not their interest). Teen years are rough to start with. And some people don't get "runner's high", so they lose the reinforcement that keeps some of those solo sports going. ...


10

Taekwondo assistant instructor here. I started studying it when I was 13. I prefer not to teach children under the age of 5 or 6 because most are not ready for it. Unless you have a very coordinated child with exceptional attention span and patience, it's just going to be an exercise in frustration for everyone. You have to know your child, however, and ...


9

Ten pin bowling should be no problem at all, but I would encourage the use of extra body protection for paintball, mostly as getting a paintball to the stomach can be bad enough without it also impacting on stretched skin or an unborn baby. Aside from that I would heartily endorse @Peter's answer. My wife continued with sports (including rock climbing) ...


9

Have you considered Capoeira? It's a cross between dance and martial arts that involves quite a bit of playful acrobatics and falling. Here are a couple samples from YouTube, which give a flavor of the sport: Adult Performance and Children's Competition. Your son is blessed to have a dad who looks for an activity in which he can express who he is!


8

When my kids run into situations like this, I usually try to emphasize two things: For most people, (probably including the others on her team) being given the ball is thought of more as a reward for hard work than necessarily giving the ball to the best player. Being passed the ball doesn't depend as much on her real skill level as on how her teammates ...


8

Cycling is a sport the whole family can do together. It grows with the family too. Initially, younger ones can be attached to an adult bike in a seat or with a bike pup. Later they become independent. Soccer is another sport everyone can play with minimal equipment.


7

If your daughter has been taking swimming lessons for the past three and a half years, then is it safe to assume she can swim safely in at least one type of stroke on her own? If so, then I'd be inclined to suggest ballet lessons, while checking your area to see if there are free or affordable swimming pools that you might have access to. Some areas have ...


7

From about age 4 and up, my top recommendation is martial arts study. In addition to being a great work-out, it teaches a useful skill and instills confidence, a sense of responsibility, and many other great traits. From birth up, swimming is another great, active way to spend time together. There's something to do in the pool at any age, and it's a great ...


7

Most martial arts schools don't take kids until they are 4 or 5, depending on the class and the school. I started my son about the time he turned 5, he's been doing it about a year and hasn't gotten fully into it yet but we have noticed an improvement in his balance. I also attend the same school, and did for a year before I signed him up, I believe its ...


7

This sort of thing is really common. My 8 year old has been training at half marathon distance (walking, jogging and running) for 6 months now. Her idea - she's raising money for a charity helping one of her friends. My eldest two have been doing triathlons since the age of 9 or so, and again, all their own idea. They were given the option of full training ...


7

When I taught preschool, Kids Yoga was one activity the preschool did with all the age levels to help them tune in to themselves for more body awareness and stress release. By four, some of the kids started participating in team sports, but for many of their parents it was long Saturdays for very little positive impact as they often complained their kids ...


6

As a former nerdy kid, I'd say that group sports, with their tendency to be full of cliques and popularity contests, were very hard for me. I've always been more at ease with biking, hiking and cross-country skiing - activities that did not depend so much on skill, that were pretty much individual in nature, and that weren't overly competitive. Many geeks I ...


6

He could try American football. While being tackled certainly isn't quite the same as falling down, it is rather similar. Alternatively, he could play defense so he gets to fall down and at the same time knock somebody else down. While I can understand being worried about youth American football, it all comes down to ensuring he has the correct coach. As ...


6

There we agreed to make sure that everybody prioritized class events in order to do our best to get a good class. No, you didn't agree. It is possible that no one spoke out against this suggestion when it was made, but that is probably mostly due to an intense social pressure in the situation. Can you imagine someone in the situation saying: "I don't ...


6

There are a few things we consider when kids are pushing to do certain activities. My daughter has taken ballet for years, and will be starting pre-pointe lessons soon. This sounds less frightening than motocross, but there are risks of both short-term injury and long-term foot structure damage if she doesn't practice, wear properly fitted shoes, and listen ...


5

No. You should not push any recreational activity, no matter how rewarding you found it, on her. However... it is perfectly appropriate to encourage her to try sports. The difference between pushing and encouraging is kind of subjective and hazy, but my interpretation is that "pushing" occurs when the child has already formed their opinion, and you ...


5

As somebody who has studied several martial arts on and off my whole life (starting at age 10) and also taught adults and kids, here's my opinion. If you just want an activity for them to do, I would say that the minimum is age 6 or 7 -- prior to that, I don't think they have the coordination, attention span, self-discipline, and understanding of the safety ...


5

Another option could be Parkour (aka free running) Here is a Video Parkour practitioners aim to get from A to B in the most efficient way possible. This is done using only the human body and the surroundings for propulsion, with a focus on maintaining as much momentum as possible while still remaining safe. There is a group that practices down at my ...



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