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26

The appropriate age depends a great deal on the specific style/art in question, the type of dojo, and the particular child. Most Karate dojos I know take kids starting around age 4-6. Most Krav Maga dojos I know won't take anyone under 14-16; some won't take minors at all. My friend's Brazilian Jui-Jitsu dojo only takes kids from age 10, but I'm told that ...


26

To me, this sounds like much ado about nothing. Your son needs to learn how to socialize and how to make friends; sounds like he's done that already, so that's not your problem. So what is your problem? The fact that some kids aren't coming to a birthday party? Sounds like a good opportunity for a conversation with your son about the real world. ...


21

I would explain that different skills require certain amount of practice and if she wants to see more action on the field she will need to put in more time to increase her skill level. Don't say it like: 'If you try harder people will pass you the ball'. As this is negative and largely not true. Soccer is about trust and other team members expect that you ...


14

If you DO make an issue out of it, what will be the result? Will the other 10 families start to consider everyone else in their priorities and scheduling, or will they apologize and keep right on with what they're doing? It's apparent they feel that having their children participate in soccer is a higher priority than having their children participate in ...


13

One way to handle it is to not say anything negative about her performance at all. A parent telling a child that they are not good at something can be very hurtful. If she has passion, then that's a great thing; encourage it and try to find clever ways to get her to practice without making it seem like it's "boring practice". Have her help coach younger ...


12

That's a tough situation... how to wake her up to a hard truth without discouraging her. But if she's serious about wanting to be really great, I guess the truth is your job here. One possibility is to try to quantify some aspect(s) of performance (something that isn't so subjective she'd just argue them)... passes completed, passes received, defenders ...


12

I think it's important to push your kids. I also think it's important not to push too hard. Balance in all things. Encourage her. Play with her yourself and make sure she enjoys it. When she agrees, then sign her up. Make sure she understands that she'll have to stay with it for at least some period of time -- it's a lot more fun once you've gotten ...


9

Taekwondo assistant instructor here. I started studying it when I was 13. I prefer not to teach children under the age of 5 or 6 because most are not ready for it. Unless you have a very coordinated child with exceptional attention span and patience, it's just going to be an exercise in frustration for everyone. You have to know your child, however, and ...


9

Ten pin bowling should be no problem at all, but I would encourage the use of extra body protection for paintball, mostly as getting a paintball to the stomach can be bad enough without it also impacting on stretched skin or an unborn baby. Aside from that I would heartily endorse @Peter's answer. My wife continued with sports (including rock climbing) ...


9

Speaking as a former teen-aged geek, here's a few things that have worked for (and on me - thanks Mom and Dad! :) ) Organized sports are kinda hit-and-miss for a geek (esp. if it's not their interest). Teen years are rough to start with. And some people don't get "runner's high", so they lose the reinforcement that keeps some of those solo sports going. ...


8

When my kids run into situations like this, I usually try to emphasize two things: For most people, (probably including the others on her team) being given the ball is thought of more as a reward for hard work than necessarily giving the ball to the best player. Being passed the ball doesn't depend as much on her real skill level as on how her teammates ...


8

Cycling is a sport the whole family can do together. It grows with the family too. Initially, younger ones can be attached to an adult bike in a seat or with a bike pup. Later they become independent. Soccer is another sport everyone can play with minimal equipment.


7

From about age 4 and up, my top recommendation is martial arts study. In addition to being a great work-out, it teaches a useful skill and instills confidence, a sense of responsibility, and many other great traits. From birth up, swimming is another great, active way to spend time together. There's something to do in the pool at any age, and it's a great ...


7

Most martial arts schools don't take kids until they are 4 or 5, depending on the class and the school. I started my son about the time he turned 5, he's been doing it about a year and hasn't gotten fully into it yet but we have noticed an improvement in his balance. I also attend the same school, and did for a year before I signed him up, I believe its ...


7

If your daughter has been taking swimming lessons for the past three and a half years, then is it safe to assume she can swim safely in at least one type of stroke on her own? If so, then I'd be inclined to suggest ballet lessons, while checking your area to see if there are free or affordable swimming pools that you might have access to. Some areas have ...


7

When I taught preschool, Kids Yoga was one activity the preschool did with all the age levels to help them tune in to themselves for more body awareness and stress release. By four, some of the kids started participating in team sports, but for many of their parents it was long Saturdays for very little positive impact as they often complained their kids ...


7

This sort of thing is really common. My 8 year old has been training at half marathon distance (walking, jogging and running) for 6 months now. Her idea - she's raising money for a charity helping one of her friends. My eldest two have been doing triathlons since the age of 9 or so, and again, all their own idea. They were given the option of full training ...


5

No. You should not push any recreational activity, no matter how rewarding you found it, on her. However... it is perfectly appropriate to encourage her to try sports. The difference between pushing and encouraging is kind of subjective and hazy, but my interpretation is that "pushing" occurs when the child has already formed their opinion, and you ...


5

As a former nerdy kid, I'd say that group sports, with their tendency to be full of cliques and popularity contests, were very hard for me. I've always been more at ease with biking, hiking and cross-country skiing - activities that did not depend so much on skill, that were pretty much individual in nature, and that weren't overly competitive. Many geeks I ...


5

There we agreed to make sure that everybody prioritized class events in order to do our best to get a good class. No, you didn't agree. It is possible that no one spoke out against this suggestion when it was made, but that is probably mostly due to an intense social pressure in the situation. Can you imagine someone in the situation saying: "I don't ...


5

I have seen this twice, and did my best to get them banned from all future games. Once, successfully. There is no place in children's sports for an adult who can't control themselves in an appropriate manner. If they remain, the kids will get a very bad example, so if necessary, club together with some other parents to ensure the offending parent is ...


4

This is a great article on age and when to starts kids on martial arts. Every style is different, every association is also different. I have found it to be dojo specific. The instructors needs to gear the class for the different age groups as each stage of life has developed certain aspects of one's body and mind. The head instructor in Japan, who teaches ...


4

As somebody who has studied several martial arts on and off my whole life (starting at age 10) and also taught adults and kids, here's my opinion. If you just want an activity for them to do, I would say that the minimum is age 6 or 7 -- prior to that, I don't think they have the coordination, attention span, self-discipline, and understanding of the safety ...


4

Based on the research I've read about from sources like the Greater Good Science Center, I would emphasize how proud you are of her when she practices and works hard, and how little it matters to you how her skill level compares to the skill level of others--at least in terms of your approval. If she wants to be Mia Hamm, you might point out that Mia Hamm ...


4

Bocce or bowls, similar sports whose popularity depend on where you live, are pretty intuitive even for children. This may not be a good idea if you're trying to use this to replace your scheduled exercise routine, though!


4

A possible option, if you can manage to get it going on such short notice, is having the birthday party as an afterparty to the tournament. I don't know if you can find a place near the tournament grounds that can handle so many kids on such short notice though.


4

An obvious solution is to move the date or time of the party to not conflict with an event that is very important to a large portion of invitees (and which they do NOT have the option to reschedule). If you don't want to change the party time, then perhaps you should consider whether it's a priority for your son's party guest list to exactly coincide with ...


3

Jogging with a jogging stroller is appropriate from about 6 months on up. Our 9 month old loves to just get out of the house and see the sites go by, and his stroller has a see-through plastic "bubble" that can roll out if it's going to be chilly with the wind on him, since he's not actually working as hard as mom or dad.


3

I am a Taekwondo assistant instructor and have taught families who take classes together. I love it when parents take classes with their children because they can help their children to practice at home, they can help keep their kids in line in class, and because martial arts promote greater respect within the family. It's easier to teach that respect to a ...


3

If she has no special health issues, her pregnancy is OK, she is in good condition and has been doing more or less regular physical activity up to now, then why not, as long as she feels OK with it. It is definitely possible to do even vigorous physical activity throughout most of one's pregnancy - if one is in good health and has been practicing regularly ...



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