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1

I found an interesting article about speech development, but it doesn't address your question, so I can only answer with anecdotal evidence. There are people who can stick their pinkie fingers in either side of their mouth and make a high-pitched whistle. Many of us learn the more common form of folding our tongues up and blowing sound out through pursed ...


0

This is normal and I highly recommend ignoring it as much as you are able. My son who is now 27 months started this around the same age. The more I tried to correct him, the more hilarious he thought it was. He now correctly calls me "daddy" most of the time, but will call me "mommy daddy" whenever he is trying to razz me. This is also an age range ...


1

My daughter is 6 and sometimes she calls me mom too, then she takes just a second to realize and calls me dad :-) Nothing to worry about, I guess. I think Mom and Dad are part of the same entity in children's head ;-)


2

My daughter did something like this for a while -- sometimes she would say "Daddy" sometimes "Mummy" but she would use either word for either parent. We tried correcting her for a while, until it dawned on us that "Mummy" meant "I want comfort from a parent (either parent)" and "Daddy" meant "I'm having fun and I want a parent to play with me (either ...


1

To us, we are unique important individuals, but to our children we're just the creatures that supply their needs. My kids are 5 and 7 and they'll still absentmindedly call my wife and I by the wrong name sometimes if they aren't paying attention. Of course, they get very upset if we accidentally call one of them by the other's name. In summary, don't ...


2

I have a son going through this phase... started addressing me as something halfway between "Mom" and "Mamá" (his mother is a native Spanish speaker, I've studied a certain amount of Spanish) at 14 months or earlier, still calls me that often at 20 months. Sometimes I remind him, "I'm your daddy. Yo soy tu papá. Mommy is over there. Mamá está allá." I ...


1

It's worth noticing that around the world, different languages have very similar sounds for parents: Dada, Mama, Nana, Papa, Baba. It is unsurprising, these are the most basic phonemes. The child learns to make their first language sounds looking into the face of a parent, imitating. 'Mama' and 'Baba' are the easiest to 'wire up', as they involve nothing ...


7

Some answers are suggesting to correct thus: "Dada not Mama!". For an infant it is much better to correct more simply, without the negative: "Dada!" The negative is an advanced mental construct that the infant has not yet acquired (as illustrated by the "Not-Pippa" example given by one writer here). In the same way that "Don't think of the blue banana" ...


1

Joel Spolsky mentioned once (probably a podcast, I did not find a reference now when searching) that the personal pronouns are typically the last class of words that a child learns because parents (and other adults) refer to themselves in third person, e.g. "Daddy can't see you", "Please give it to Mommy", etc. What are the good approaches to teach her ...


3

Yes, this happened to us with our eldest son. He was slow learning to talk and didn't see the use of it, as his parents were clairvoyant anyway. Not. We were however, very good at discerning his needs and wishes. Which did not exactly help with his learning. 'Mama' was actually one of his first words, soon followed by 'Papa'. And my wife was quite miffed ...


3

Your post makes me laugh as I reminds me time when my son was younger. He was around 2 years old (I don't remember exactly). He had period when he called me and my wife "mama" and after while he switch and call both of us "dada", and after while whole circle starts from beginning and he called us "mama". So don't worry, just each time when you call "mummy" ...


8

This is no big deal, and you shouldn't sweat it. My daughter is almost 2 1/2 and calls her aunt "Uncle Meghan," and everyone thinks it's hilarious. Both of my kids have gone through the same as yours, and I cemented the fact that my name was not "Mommy" by jokingly saying, "I-AIN'T-CHE-MAMA!" -- which evokes laughter and slowly brings the point home as ...


57

My son (similar age) calls both me and his mum "Daddy". He also has a habit of calling all animals Cows or Sheep. Like Erica says in the comment, it's pretty standard. They've learnt a single word which at the moment means "Parent/Adult/Someone that's not Me". As they learn more words they can elaborate on the distinction. Just reinforce the difference ...



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