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20

Usually children learn the words they need to know to get particular types of attention first, and use them most frequently. So while there may be many reasons for her to choose saying "baba" and "dede" more frequently than "anne" one possibility is that you and grandpa don't pay as much attention to her as her mother. When she wants her mother's ...


17

I'm married to a Speech Therapist who owns her own clinic, so while she's really the best to answer your question, I can tell you from my observations and discussions with my wife that your child would not likely qualify as "delayed" based on your description. We also have a 2 year-old who's speech developed slower than his older sister's so that also gives ...


12

Please see this PDF called the Denver Developmental II. It represents normal milestones in development and is used around the world. The white area in each rectangle are the normals; the blue areas are the "late but not off the chart yet". Off the chart indicates a need to probe further. As you can see (I've added the arrows at 22 months), by now he's ...


11

If you say dadadadada and she repeats it, she is parroting. If she sees her dada and says "dada", then she is talking. Basically, talking is saying something that reflects a shared reality. Children parrot before they talk. Her first word will be when she says something appropriate (usually a noun) spontaneously. Bye (if she's leaving someone), dada when ...


11

The saying I heard since I was a child was "walking by one, talking by two." She'll get there! My son called me 'ball' for quite a while after he could say 'Daddy,' but who gets the lion's share of the kisses and snuggles? :) If you have serious concerns about her development, see your pediatrician. However, this internet stranger's opinion, based on ...


10

If you want to encourage his development, spend time with him and talk to him like you would an adult. Speak to him as though he can understand everything you are saying. If you need to go to the gas station or grocery store, take him with you and explain what is going on while you're doing it. Let him hear you speak with other people. He may not like ...


7

My niece used to say "mommy", "daddy" and the name of her older brother. The dog was "puppy". She took a long time to say "grandma" but they all were suspicious that "grandpa" was actually referring to both grandparents because one day she was taken to one of those zoos for kids and all the animals where "puppy" (so "puppy" was actually the designation for ...


7

If you are worried, you should have his hearing checked first. It is not uncommon for Small children to develop a hearing impediment caused by ear infections, which will have an impact on their speech development.


7

The approach we took with our child was and is to just ask for clarification, or casually correct the word. she responds to something with "uh-huh" and I reply either "I can't understand you, can you please say yes or no?" or if I was sure of her reply, "How about yes?" I have found that making a huge big deal out of it is not especially productive.


6

Anongoodnurse's answer is spot on, but I wanted to add a couple of things. First off, don't forget we as humans are amazing at pattern recognition, to the point that we see it where it doesn't belong. You'll hear her 'say' lots of things that seem like perfect words, once, but not again - because she didn't really say it, she just made a sound that your ...


6

As a mother and speech-language pathologist, I understand the concerns of speech and language development. Some general information to know is each sound of our language has a different range of ages in which your child should correctly produce the sound. By age 8, your child should be able to produce all sounds of the English language, unless second ...


6

I agree with @jeremy but with a slight adaptation. As @jeremy suggested, start the first few times with "I'm sorry, I didn't understand you." This is good to let them know that slang or poor articulation isn't adequate to communicate. However, at some point you have to transition your child to prompting themselves less you get stuck in a cycle of ...


5

If you are worried because you think your child is considerably behind in learning to speak, then you need to have a few things checked. Start out by getting the ears checked. If they seem to be OK, but you're still worried, have your child checked neurologically. Note that it is not uncommon that boys take a bit longer than girls to reach a certain ...


5

That's consistent with my experience as well. If you're comparing him to the kids at preschool/daycare, if he's only been there a month he's going to have a hard time fitting in right away - that's normal. Nonetheless, my son was at daycare since 6 weeks old and still didn't play with others much at two. Two year olds - and even many three year olds - ...


4

Our son did not use whole sentences till the age of two. He said only the last syllable of particular word. We noticed that he is lagging behind in speaking as soon as he was a year old. I took him to speaking games and the therapist there advised me to speak with his pediatrician. At first pediatrician didn't take me seriously but when he was two she ...


3

Peers count for a lot. You can expect them to talk like their peers. Ref. In Raising Bebe, the author had a funny story about her toddler learning to cuss (with French toddler cuss words) from her peers at pre-school. Modeling counts, while you can not expect them to understand immediately which contexts to use whqt, they will eventually use the right ...


3

That all sounds very normal. Children this age play side-by-side more than they play with each other. And language develops at different rates for different kids. Between 2 and 3, vocabulary usually grows to about 200 words. 50 is a good start. For further reading: Speech and Language Developmental Milestones (Department of Health and Human Services)


3

It might be worth getting her hearing checked, a sudden change might indicate a change in the feed-back loop between what she says and what she hears. At age 4, my son's adenoids closed off his Eustachian tubes thus filling his inner ears with liquid and reducing his hearing significantly. Many children's Eustachian do not fully develop until the age of 8.


3

My daughter didn't speak any even remotely recognizable words at 2 years old. We didn't do anything special, and eventually she figured it out. She is 13 years old now, and has had straight A's for 5 years straight, scored in the 99th percentile across the board on her high school entrance exams, played the lead in the 8th-grade play, and won a partial ...


3

I do not know who said that he should know 50+ words. That's clearly not the case with the vast majority of children. Here is a nice chart on child development I read somewhere on this site (do not take this chart as absolute limits, most children that are advanced in one area tend to be somewhat late in another area): Development chart From what you say, ...


2

Age of Child (source: http://childdevelopmentinfo.com/child-development/language_development/) 6 Months Vocalization with intonation Responds to his name Responds to human voices without visual cues by turning his head and eyes Responds appropriately to friendly and angry tones 12 Months Uses one or more words with meaning (this may be a fragment ...


2

I'm just a parent of a little girl slightly older than your son. She has similar problems, but I'm not worried. I recommend to read with him, picture books, let him locate pictures of animals and name them, or ask what they say. Cat, snake, dog... Do not hesitate to read the very same book twice in a row, or more, but you must keep him active and ...


2

Old question, but I'm answering for posterity. Glad this one had a happy ending. I have a thought you may find encouraging--particularly in conjunction with other answers. From two years old to about seven my boy had a lisp and trouble pronouncing "r" properly. His affected speech was not so prevalent that he was difficult to understand or teased by other ...


1

First, I need to prerequisite my answer by saying that you should have your grandchild evaluated by a licensed Speech Language Pathologist. You can also discuss your concerns with your pediatrician and you may want to do that first because many insurance companies will not pay for a speech-language evaluation without a referral from the child's ...


1

You certainly shouldn't be concerned! When she is a little older, standing behind you trying to get your attention while yo are trying to do some work, or just have a conversation, the constant "Dad!, Dad!, Dad!, Dad!...... Dad!" wont be in the least bit flattering :) Seriously, it could simply be that Mum gives her more immediate attention than you do - so ...


1

Anecdotal only but I didn't say anything much for years after my first word. One time my mum threw on the brakes and I fell into the foot-well and my first sentence was "If you do that again, I will pack my bags and move to Granny's house." So I kinda skipped all the steps between around 1 year-old to about 4 year. After that though, no-one could shut me ...


1

I realize I am a bit late for this question, but I only just found it. What are the good approaches to teach her ways to understand and use first and second persons in speech? As you will have found out by now, this was nothing to worry about, because your child presumably has learned it within probably 6 months of you asking this question. I suspect ...


1

My youngest is also 22 months, and is definitely not "speaking properly" by some definition, though he sounds like he's a little further along than yours - he puts 3-5 words together ("Not do that", "Stand up", etc.). Definitely not sentences or anything else I'd call "properly", but quite in the normal range for a child of that age from my experience. ...


1

Speaking in sentences and asking for things in sentences are two somewhat different things. If the problem is just asking for things - ie, he'll talk about things he's interested like trains or cars in sentences - reminding him to ask in sentences is the right approach; eventually he'll learn to do so. My three year old still has trouble asking for ...


1

When raising our baby, the changing table was one good place for practicing sound mimicry. I would make a sound, and she would try to imitate. We started with vowel sounds, then work on consonant sounds. Each time she figured out how to form her lips, teeth and tongue to make the sound correctly, I would respond with excitement and laughter. She loved it, ...



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