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11

Yes, it's normal. The speed of speech development varies widely, but all that's expected from a two-to-three year-old is that they form two-word phrases and speak sufficiently comprehensibly to be understood by their parents, which your son seems to be doing just fine. Boys also tend to be slower to pick up speech than girls. Here's a handy milestone ...


5

Most mispronunciations are not something you can correct by telling the child they are saying it wrongly. One of my children had a persistent use of the n sound where l belongs (eg eating nunch) and I kept asking my doctor who kept saying n is one of the last sounds for children to get right. I kept countering that if my child was saying "wunch" like the ...


4

A professional might count it separately, but it's very common for children that age to use specific words in a general context or vice versa. For example, my kids used the word "Daddy" to mean "any man" for a while. "Ball" might mean "any toy" or "something you throw." That's just a natural part of having a limited vocabulary. As your vocabulary grows, ...


4

Since it isn't really a 100% of the time kind of a deal, I think Dave Nelson has nailed it on the head. My daughter picked up a french accent for awhile at about the same age (after seeing Rattatouille) and I mysteriously developed a southern drawl when I was three as well. My parents talk about me getting dressed up and using the accent when I was wearing ...


4

One technique we were taught, that has helped me (but still has a long way to go, as I always talk too fast when presenting - just look at any of the videos of me online) is to treat full stops as breaths. Every time you hit a full stop, breathe. A full breath. This forces you to slow down, and it helps your thought processes. It works for kids - since I ...


4

Honestly, you are already doing most of what can be done about it, and even this tip isn't likely to make things a whole lot better. This is a common problem with this age group and up through the teen years. The best answer I found was to do what you are doing really - but consistently and refuse to understand when she doesn't slow down. Since she ...


3

The literature on grammar acquisition distinguishes the following three stages. One-word stage (e.g., "mama", "papa" "water", "poop"...) Two-word stage (e.g., "want cookie", "flower blue",...) For everyday purposes, adult-like grammatical competence. In reality, the big jump is transitioning from the one-word stage to the two-word stage. One your kid ...


3

At 4 months old, your baby is simply experimenting with their voice and sounds and trying to make different vocalizations. This is not permanent so I wouldn't worry about correcting any behaviors. Maybe if you are talking about a 2 year old screeching, then some of the answers provided here are relevant. Otherwise for an infant, it's just another ...


3

While you have sign language, have you tried sign supported speech? My eldest son is hard of hearing. For his first couple of years of school, he went to a special school for children with severe speech and language difficulties. He was one of the few children there with a 'technical' hearing problem; most had problems somewhere on the autistic spectrum. ...


3

My kids all went through stages like that, but I had always assumed it was because we live in Alabama. My wife and I have relatively "neutral" American accents, having grown up in Arizona. My guess is it's part of his development of phonological awareness. Age three is when kids generally start becoming aware that words are made up of separate sounds.


3

Most speech concerns are not real worries until a child is 5 or 6. If children continue to have a lisp when they begin elementary school they are generally referred to a speech specialist to work on those sounds. As much as a lisp in a toddler is not a concern, children learn language from imitating what they hear. It is never too young to speak clearly and ...


3

I was a very, very fast speaker as a child, and continued to be so until I was 15 yo or so. While everyone pointed it out, no one really made me feel bad about it, which probably helped a lot. Also my Dad was of the opinion I spoke so fast because I thought too fast which made me feel really good!! But I was constantly advised to speak slower, and I always ...


1

There's nothing inherently wrong with speaking rapidly. The truth is, is that the speaker is understood more often than they are not when enunciation is not an issue. Take, for instance, reading... If you were to occlude the bottom half of every letter in English, one would generally still be able to read. I remember reading somewhere that that's how the ...


1

Once she is old enough (depending on where you are, this is likely between 7th and 9th grades), enroll her in Speech and Debate. In Debate, talking fast is a big plus - but talking fast AND being understandable is absolutely crucial; and in other variants of speech, clarity and enunciation is very important. On top of that, it can be pretty fun, especially ...



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