Hot answers tagged

57

My son (similar age) calls both me and his mum "Daddy". He also has a habit of calling all animals Cows or Sheep. Like Erica says in the comment, it's pretty standard. They've learnt a single word which at the moment means "Parent/Adult/Someone that's not Me". As they learn more words they can elaborate on the distinction. Just reinforce the difference ...


22

Usually children learn the words they need to know to get particular types of attention first, and use them most frequently. So while there may be many reasons for her to choose saying "baba" and "dede" more frequently than "anne" one possibility is that you and grandpa don't pay as much attention to her as her mother. When she wants her mother's ...


17

I'm married to a Speech Therapist who owns her own clinic, so while she's really the best to answer your question, I can tell you from my observations and discussions with my wife that your child would not likely qualify as "delayed" based on your description. We also have a 2 year-old who's speech developed slower than his older sister's so that also gives ...


12

You need to have your son assessed by a licensed Speech-Language Pathologist. It is important that your son gets treatment for his stuttering before the age of 11, regardless of the cause. Studies indicate that after 11 years of age it is much harder to remediate. Keep in mind that 11 is just a typical number based on a standard population. You can find an ...


12

If you want to encourage his development, spend time with him and talk to him like you would an adult. Speak to him as though he can understand everything you are saying. If you need to go to the gas station or grocery store, take him with you and explain what is going on while you're doing it. Let him hear you speak with other people. He may not like ...


12

The saying I heard since I was a child was "walking by one, talking by two." She'll get there! My son called me 'ball' for quite a while after he could say 'Daddy,' but who gets the lion's share of the kisses and snuggles? :) If you have serious concerns about her development, see your pediatrician. However, this internet stranger's opinion, based on ...


10

This is the sort of issue that happens all the time with toddlers and preschoolers: when sufficiently well rested and fed, they're polite and well behaved, but when something's amiss things go poorly. When this happens with us, we address it by triaging the problem first, and then make a choice based on that result. Why did he refuse to ask nicely? ...


9

To some extent: yes, the questions may well be too open-ended. Not even exactly too open ended, just asking for information that he doesn't necessarily have. Better is to ask for more specific categories, and better still is to not worry about any of it: get him to a calm place, then let him tell you on his own what's wrong, if there's anything actionable, ...


8

My niece used to say "mommy", "daddy" and the name of her older brother. The dog was "puppy". She took a long time to say "grandma" but they all were suspicious that "grandpa" was actually referring to both grandparents because one day she was taken to one of those zoos for kids and all the animals where "puppy" (so "puppy" was actually the designation for ...


8

This is no big deal, and you shouldn't sweat it. My daughter is almost 2 1/2 and calls her aunt "Uncle Meghan," and everyone thinks it's hilarious. Both of my kids have gone through the same as yours, and I cemented the fact that my name was not "Mommy" by jokingly saying, "I-AIN'T-CHE-MAMA!" -- which evokes laughter and slowly brings the point home as ...


7

If you are worried, you should have his hearing checked first. It is not uncommon for Small children to develop a hearing impediment caused by ear infections, which will have an impact on their speech development.


7

Some answers are suggesting to correct thus: "Dada not Mama!". For an infant it is much better to correct more simply, without the negative: "Dada!" The negative is an advanced mental construct that the infant has not yet acquired (as illustrated by the "Not-Pippa" example given by one writer here). In the same way that "Don't think of the blue banana" ...


6

Children develop at their own speed. Especially language shows a lot of variation. Some start early and form complex sentences soon, others start early, stay at the one- or two-word stage for a looong time, then catch up and some are virtually mute, then improve drastically and "never stop talking" again. If you search around here at Parenting SE there are a ...


6

First: Pick your battles wisely. There is no need to train your child to use the proper words in each and every case. (And no, this is not the "Aawww, so cute when he says 'Duper!'" perspective, more an "The grass doesn't grow faster when you pull on it.") Even if you suspect "stubbornness" remember that your child has reached an age where he starts to ...


5

Well, it's a gradual process. What are the milestones for speech and language development? The first signs of communication occur when an infant learns that a cry will bring food, comfort, and companionship. Newborns also begin to recognize important sounds in their environment, such as the voice of their mother or primary caretaker. As they grow, ...


4

It wasn't clear from your question, but I'm going to assume in my answer that your son is able to communicate clearly when he makes a concerted effort, but perhaps makes it through a paragraph or two before slipping back. My eight year-old has a frustrating habit of speech where he talks when no one is listening. What I do is simply not shield him from ...


4

I stutter. I started when I was 5 or 6, around the time my dad became unemployed and we needed to move across the country. I did speech therapy for all of elementary school and part of middle school, until I was no longer improving. I was never cured, but did learn to communicate in a way where my speech impediment isn't obvious in most situation. I'm able ...


4

Our son did not use whole sentences till the age of two. He said only the last syllable of particular word. We noticed that he is lagging behind in speaking as soon as he was a year old. I took him to speaking games and the therapist there advised me to speak with his pediatrician. At first pediatrician didn't take me seriously but when he was two she ...


4

My daughter has recently turned 4 and was raised in somewhat the same way. We speak Dutch to her, but she sees a lot of English videos and stories, so she also picks up some Dutch. She started making proper sentences shortly after she turned 3 and is currently doing quite well. She occasionally mixes English and Dutch words and understands that they mean ...


4

This behavior is a normal part of development for a two-year-old. At 24 months a child should have about 70% accuracy of consonants, and by 36 months about 87% accuracy. Producing "b" instead of "f" is one example of a very common mistake a child of this age might make. Of course, if it seems like the accuracy is worse than 70%, or if the child does not ...


3

Age of Child (source: http://childdevelopmentinfo.com/child-development/language_development/) 6 Months Vocalization with intonation Responds to his name Responds to human voices without visual cues by turning his head and eyes Responds appropriately to friendly and angry tones 12 Months Uses one or more words with meaning (this may be a fragment ...


3

My daughter didn't speak any even remotely recognizable words at 2 years old. We didn't do anything special, and eventually she figured it out. She is 13 years old now, and has had straight A's for 5 years straight, scored in the 99th percentile across the board on her high school entrance exams, played the lead in the 8th-grade play, and won a partial ...


3

I do not know who said that he should know 50+ words. That's clearly not the case with the vast majority of children. Here is a nice chart on child development I read somewhere on this site (do not take this chart as absolute limits, most children that are advanced in one area tend to be somewhat late in another area): Development chart From what you say, ...


3

This is an interesting question and kudos for wanting to give your child such a head start in languages. Most long-term successfull cases I know rely on different persons speaking different languages. Some examples: Two parents with different native languages, each using their language with the children. One parent using a learned language only. ...


3

Our son is also 16 months and I was starting to worry slightly as he didn't seem to be saying any words until recently. He didn't even say Mama or Papa. I had read that at one year, children should be saying one or two words in addition to Mummy and Daddy. However, in recent weeks, we suddenly started to understand a lot of words from my son. He currently ...


3

Your post makes me laugh as I reminds me time when my son was younger. He was around 2 years old (I don't remember exactly). He had period when he called me and my wife "mama" and after while he switch and call both of us "dada", and after while whole circle starts from beginning and he called us "mama". So don't worry, just each time when you call "mummy" ...


3

Yes, this happened to us with our eldest son. He was slow learning to talk and didn't see the use of it, as his parents were clairvoyant anyway. Not. We were however, very good at discerning his needs and wishes. Which did not exactly help with his learning. 'Mama' was actually one of his first words, soon followed by 'Papa'. And my wife was quite miffed ...


2

A toddler learn most of his/her early feats by imitation. That goes the same way with language. They essentially repeat what they have heard. Babbling is when they start to do that. The "wah-er-bah-dah" does not sound like anything you'd recognised, but it is their best attempt to say something they heard. My 15 month-old daughter makes a few of those ...


2

Old question, but I'm answering for posterity. Glad this one had a happy ending. I have a thought you may find encouraging--particularly in conjunction with other answers. From two years old to about seven my boy had a lisp and trouble pronouncing "r" properly. His affected speech was not so prevalent that he was difficult to understand or teased by other ...


2

You certainly shouldn't be concerned! When she is a little older, standing behind you trying to get your attention while yo are trying to do some work, or just have a conversation, the constant "Dad!, Dad!, Dad!, Dad!...... Dad!" wont be in the least bit flattering :) Seriously, it could simply be that Mum gives her more immediate attention than you do - so ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible