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11

Yes, it's normal. The speed of speech development varies widely, but all that's expected from a two-to-three year-old is that they form two-word phrases and speak sufficiently comprehensibly to be understood by their parents, which your son seems to be doing just fine. Boys also tend to be slower to pick up speech than girls. Here's a handy milestone ...


11

If you say dadadadada and she repeats it, she is parroting. If she sees her dada and says "dada", then she is talking. Basically, talking is saying something that reflects a shared reality. Children parrot before they talk. Her first word will be when she says something appropriate (usually a noun) spontaneously. Bye (if she's leaving someone), dada when ...


9

Please see this PDF called the Denver Developmental II. It represents normal milestones in development and is used around the world. The white area in each rectangle are the normals; the blue areas are the "late but not off the chart yet". Off the chart indicates a need to probe further. As you can see (I've added the arrows at 22 months), by now he's ...


7

The approach we took with our child was and is to just ask for clarification, or casually correct the word. she responds to something with "uh-huh" and I reply either "I can't understand you, can you please say yes or no?" or if I was sure of her reply, "How about yes?" I have found that making a huge big deal out of it is not especially productive.


6

As a mother and speech-language pathologist, I understand the concerns of speech and language development. Some general information to know is each sound of our language has a different range of ages in which your child should correctly produce the sound. By age 8, your child should be able to produce all sounds of the English language, unless second ...


6

I agree with @jeremy but with a slight adaptation. As @jeremy suggested, start the first few times with "I'm sorry, I didn't understand you." This is good to let them know that slang or poor articulation isn't adequate to communicate. However, at some point you have to transition your child to prompting themselves less you get stuck in a cycle of ...


6

Anongoodnurse's answer is spot on, but I wanted to add a couple of things. First off, don't forget we as humans are amazing at pattern recognition, to the point that we see it where it doesn't belong. You'll hear her 'say' lots of things that seem like perfect words, once, but not again - because she didn't really say it, she just made a sound that your ...


5

That's consistent with my experience as well. If you're comparing him to the kids at preschool/daycare, if he's only been there a month he's going to have a hard time fitting in right away - that's normal. Nonetheless, my son was at daycare since 6 weeks old and still didn't play with others much at two. Two year olds - and even many three year olds - ...


4

One technique we were taught, that has helped me (but still has a long way to go, as I always talk too fast when presenting - just look at any of the videos of me online) is to treat full stops as breaths. Every time you hit a full stop, breathe. A full breath. This forces you to slow down, and it helps your thought processes. It works for kids - since I ...


4

Honestly, you are already doing most of what can be done about it, and even this tip isn't likely to make things a whole lot better. This is a common problem with this age group and up through the teen years. The best answer I found was to do what you are doing really - but consistently and refuse to understand when she doesn't slow down. Since she ...


3

At 4 months old, your baby is simply experimenting with their voice and sounds and trying to make different vocalizations. This is not permanent so I wouldn't worry about correcting any behaviors. Maybe if you are talking about a 2 year old screeching, then some of the answers provided here are relevant. Otherwise for an infant, it's just another ...


3

While you have sign language, have you tried sign supported speech? My eldest son is hard of hearing. For his first couple of years of school, he went to a special school for children with severe speech and language difficulties. He was one of the few children there with a 'technical' hearing problem; most had problems somewhere on the autistic spectrum. ...


3

The literature on grammar acquisition distinguishes the following three stages. One-word stage (e.g., "mama", "papa" "water", "poop"...) Two-word stage (e.g., "want cookie", "flower blue",...) For everyday purposes, adult-like grammatical competence. In reality, the big jump is transitioning from the one-word stage to the two-word stage. One your kid ...


3

I was a very, very fast speaker as a child, and continued to be so until I was 15 yo or so. While everyone pointed it out, no one really made me feel bad about it, which probably helped a lot. Also my Dad was of the opinion I spoke so fast because I thought too fast which made me feel really good!! But I was constantly advised to speak slower, and I always ...


3

It might be worth getting her hearing checked, a sudden change might indicate a change in the feed-back loop between what she says and what she hears. At age 4, my son's adenoids closed off his Eustachian tubes thus filling his inner ears with liquid and reducing his hearing significantly. Many children's Eustachian do not fully develop until the age of 8.


3

That all sounds very normal. Children this age play side-by-side more than they play with each other. And language develops at different rates for different kids. Between 2 and 3, vocabulary usually grows to about 200 words. 50 is a good start. For further reading: Speech and Language Developmental Milestones (Department of Health and Human Services)


3

Peers count for a lot. You can expect them to talk like their peers. Ref. In Raising Bebe, the author had a funny story about her toddler learning to cuss (with French toddler cuss words) from her peers at pre-school. Modeling counts, while you can not expect them to understand immediately which contexts to use whqt, they will eventually use the right ...


1

My youngest is also 22 months, and is definitely not "speaking properly" by some definition, though he sounds like he's a little further along than yours - he puts 3-5 words together ("Not do that", "Stand up", etc.). Definitely not sentences or anything else I'd call "properly", but quite in the normal range for a child of that age from my experience. ...


1

Speaking in sentences and asking for things in sentences are two somewhat different things. If the problem is just asking for things - ie, he'll talk about things he's interested like trains or cars in sentences - reminding him to ask in sentences is the right approach; eventually he'll learn to do so. My three year old still has trouble asking for ...


1

If you worried because you think your child is considerably behind in learning to speak, then you need to have a few things checked. Start out by getting the ears checked. If they seem to be OK, but you're still worried, have your child checked neurologically. Note that it is not uncommon that boys take a bit longer reach a certain speech ability than ...


1

There's nothing inherently wrong with speaking rapidly. The truth is, is that the speaker is understood more often than they are not when enunciation is not an issue. Take, for instance, reading... If you were to occlude the bottom half of every letter in English, one would generally still be able to read. I remember reading somewhere that that's how the ...


1

Once she is old enough (depending on where you are, this is likely between 7th and 9th grades), enroll her in Speech and Debate. In Debate, talking fast is a big plus - but talking fast AND being understandable is absolutely crucial; and in other variants of speech, clarity and enunciation is very important. On top of that, it can be pretty fun, especially ...


1

When raising our baby, the changing table was one good place for practicing sound mimicry. I would make a sound, and she would try to imitate. We started with vowel sounds, then work on consonant sounds. Each time she figured out how to form her lips, teeth and tongue to make the sound correctly, I would respond with excitement and laughter. She loved it, ...



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