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19

The /r/ sound is quite complex to produce and requires refined oral motor skills. It is often one of the last developing sounds in children. As a speech language pathologist, I work with many children who have difficulty with this sound. Because it's a later developing sound, using another sound such as the /l/ for it at 3 years of age is considered ...


17

According to this article, by the time your child is 18 months old, he/she should have a vocabulary of about 20 words, and a vocabulary of 50 words by the time he/she is 2. However.... THIS article from the Mayo Clinic says that, really, by the end of 18 months (so closer to 19 months, really) your child may only say 8-10 words and that this is ...


16

"Boon" is very acceptable for balloon at 11 months. Besides the medial /l/sound being one of the later developing sounds (until around age 7 is acceptable) a child with a 2 word vocabulary has not yet mastered the concept of syllables. Reduplicated syllables such as mama, dada, bye-bye, night-night are often their first successful 2 syllable words. Their ...


13

"Yes, I see the dinosaur!" As far as I've heard and read (I have no source at hand, that I could cite), it is good to repeat the words pronounced clearly and correctly and IMHO it is better for the child if you encourage it with "Yes....". Our son (now 4 years old) is relatively far with speaking. He does not like it at all, when he is corrected and then ...


12

The best way I've found to help with this is to teach them a song where they use the 1st and 2nd person pronouns along with pointing. They would point to themselves when saying I or me. They would point outwards or to someone else when saying you. They will scan their hand across the room or point to multiple people when saying they, etc. This helped my 3yo ...


12

First of all, don't worry too much. Many 2yos have trouble getting pronouns right with regard to person (1st, 2nd, 3rd). The way you're trying to teach person pronouns is suboptimal because if your child imitates you directly, she's doing it wrong. The easiest language learning begins with direct imitation. So, you can "cheat" by using a puppet or ...


11

I took a slightly different approach to the other answers. I simply ignored the screeching, and exaggerated my reactions to everything else. If he smiled, cooed, burped, or even simply made eye contact, I would put on a big smile and talk to him, tickle him, etc.. When he made loud, painful sounds, I made sure my expression didn't flicker, and I gave him ...


11

Yes, it's normal. The speed of speech development varies widely, but all that's expected from a two-to-three year-old is that they form two-word phrases and speak sufficiently comprehensibly to be understood by their parents, which your son seems to be doing just fine. Boys also tend to be slower to pick up speech than girls. Here's a handy milestone ...


11

If you say dadadadada and she repeats it, she is parroting. If she sees her dada and says "dada", then she is talking. Basically, talking is saying something that reflects a shared reality. Children parrot before they talk. Her first word will be when she says something appropriate (usually a noun) spontaneously. Bye (if she's leaving someone), dada when ...


10

It sounds like your baby is right where she needs to be. Normal babies start reaching language milestones at a fairly wide range of ages. Some babies may hit some milestones early, and others late. You may have reason for concern if your child misses several milestones, but it doesn't sound like that is the case with your daughter. The language ...


9

You should repeat his sentence but with the correct form of the word. When he says "A boon!" you could say "Yes, a balloon!". Children learn by copying, and this way you're not criticising you're just joining in a conversation and having fun. http://www.nhs.uk/Planners/birthtofive/Pages/Yourchildsspeech.aspx If your child is trying to make a word but ...


9

As a speech language pathologist, I've been trained in treating stuttering. Yet, when my own child became dysfluent at an early age, I was baffled and concerned. Most children go through a period of dysfluent speech (stuttering) between the ages of 2 and 5 years. There is a normal development dysfluency BUT this is also the age that many with TRUE ...


9

I am a language developmentalist and at 18 months of age I would expect an 18 month old child to have between 6 and 20 words of speech. You have to bear in mind that development does not proceed at the same rate in all children and that 18 months is still very, very young. As long as her understanding of spoken language is improving then that is all that ...


8

I was at the University of Alberta while they were doing a 2-week clinic for people (adults) who stutter. The participants that I spoke to said they had made huge progress in that short time. While we were talking, there was very little evidence of a stutter. Some had come to the clinic virtually unable to talk. So, if your child is developing a stutter, ...


8

The best advice is to ask your pediatrician. As well, at least around here, there is a program run by the city called birth to three where they will come evaluate a child for free and then have a sliding pay scale should services be needed. Check to see if your area has something like this. We used them and they were great.


7

We though our son could hear perfectly too. We could communicate effectively with him, he seemed to hear us from across the room and seemed to have no problems. When he started childcare, we found that he did not learn as much as we'd expected from the group environment and would often ignore the kindergarten teachers. By chance, a doctor mentioned to us ...


7

The approach we took with our child was and is to just ask for clarification, or casually correct the word. she responds to something with "uh-huh" and I reply either "I can't understand you, can you please say yes or no?" or if I was sure of her reply, "How about yes?" I have found that making a huge big deal out of it is not especially productive.


6

As a speech language pathologist, the general rule of thumb is one word is expected at 1 year of age. Some children have many words while some such as dual language learners may be weeks or months later. Your child is not delayed in speaking words. Speech development begins with a child cooing and babbling and moves on to jargon. These milestones are the ...


6

We had our daughter tested by an audiologist who often dealt with children. Although our daughter was fine, the audiologist told us that most parents bring their children in when it's way too late. Some children had gone years without their problems being diagnosed. As Morah said, speak to a pediatrician but also ask about the option of having your child's ...


6

Regarding speech - I was reading an article recently about some research in this area. Scientists divided kids who didn't speak and were about 2-3yo in three groups. All groups had a class where teacher would show cards with animals and say something like "Dog, dog says woof-woof" 1st group had no physical trainings and was a control group 2nd group ...


6

There's not necessarily a correlation between walking and talking, but it is very common for different children to meet milestones at different rates and in different orders. Some things are easier than others, and that differs from person to person, even as adults. Sometimes it's not a matter of competence, but of personality. Some people just plain like ...


6

Turn off the TV! Sorry for shouting, but a toddler should not watch much television, and certainly not "all day" as you state! Our user dave posted this very related answer: The American Academy of Pediatrics have [warned] "that parents should limit the amount of time their infants and toddlers spend in front of any sort of screen and reaffirmed ...


6

As a mother and speech-language pathologist, I understand the concerns of speech and language development. Some general information to know is each sound of our language has a different range of ages in which your child should correctly produce the sound. By age 8, your child should be able to produce all sounds of the English language, unless second ...


6

I agree with @jeremy but with a slight adaptation. As @jeremy suggested, start the first few times with "I'm sorry, I didn't understand you." This is good to let them know that slang or poor articulation isn't adequate to communicate. However, at some point you have to transition your child to prompting themselves less you get stuck in a cycle of ...


6

Anongoodnurse's answer is spot on, but I wanted to add a couple of things. First off, don't forget we as humans are amazing at pattern recognition, to the point that we see it where it doesn't belong. You'll hear her 'say' lots of things that seem like perfect words, once, but not again - because she didn't really say it, she just made a sound that your ...


5

Don't panic. Children develop at different rates, and 10 months is very young. There's no immediate cause for concern. Don't force. Why put pressure on a 10 month old to perform? My investigation into this suggests that she's still a little young for you to expect her to pronounce recognizable words.


5

Our son had a similar issue around his 2nd birthday, where he often repeated the first syllable(s) of a sentence 5.. 8 times and then said the word completely (often but not necessarily in situations where he was excited or nervous). I'm not an expert for development of children and their ability to talk, but I consider him quite ahead for his age (also at ...


5

I am a qualified child developmentalist, I also treat children who have developmental disabilities, including language and communication impairments in children. It is perfectly normal for a child to pass through a stage where they stutter, - the overwhelming majority of children do so. As long as there are no other developmental symptoms and the ...


5

Children with autism are each very different but communication tends to be difficult for most of them. Getting a child with autism is speak is usually a great challenge even for a trained speech therapist, so know that there is usually no quick fix. Observe carefully your child's communication. Encourage eye contact by holding object he desires near your ...


5

It depends. Certain things should be treated right away with therapy but stuttering of certain types, switching vowels or consonants, and many other "issues" may be completely normal speech progression, especially in a 2.5 year old. We got my son's speech checked out for a similar reason and the professional determined that it was normal. She turned out ...



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