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20

Usually children learn the words they need to know to get particular types of attention first, and use them most frequently. So while there may be many reasons for her to choose saying "baba" and "dede" more frequently than "anne" one possibility is that you and grandpa don't pay as much attention to her as her mother. When she wants her mother's ...


19

The /r/ sound is quite complex to produce and requires refined oral motor skills. It is often one of the last developing sounds in children. As a speech language pathologist, I work with many children who have difficulty with this sound. Because it's a later developing sound, using another sound such as the /l/ for it at 3 years of age is considered ...


17

According to this article, by the time your child is 18 months old, he/she should have a vocabulary of about 20 words, and a vocabulary of 50 words by the time he/she is 2. However.... THIS article from the Mayo Clinic says that, really, by the end of 18 months (so closer to 19 months, really) your child may only say 8-10 words and that this is ...


17

I'm married to a Speech Therapist who owns her own clinic, so while she's really the best to answer your question, I can tell you from my observations and discussions with my wife that your child would not likely qualify as "delayed" based on your description. We also have a 2 year-old who's speech developed slower than his older sister's so that also gives ...


16

"Boon" is very acceptable for balloon at 11 months. Besides the medial /l/sound being one of the later developing sounds (until around age 7 is acceptable) a child with a 2 word vocabulary has not yet mastered the concept of syllables. Reduplicated syllables such as mama, dada, bye-bye, night-night are often their first successful 2 syllable words. Their ...


15

I took a slightly different approach to the other answers. I simply ignored the screeching, and exaggerated my reactions to everything else. If he smiled, cooed, burped, or even simply made eye contact, I would put on a big smile and talk to him, tickle him, etc.. When he made loud, painful sounds, I made sure my expression didn't flicker, and I gave him ...


14

First of all, don't worry too much. Many 2yos have trouble getting pronouns right with regard to person (1st, 2nd, 3rd). The way you're trying to teach person pronouns is suboptimal because if your child imitates you directly, she's doing it wrong. The easiest language learning begins with direct imitation. So, you can "cheat" by using a puppet or ...


13

"Yes, I see the dinosaur!" As far as I've heard and read (I have no source at hand, that I could cite), it is good to repeat the words pronounced clearly and correctly and IMHO it is better for the child if you encourage it with "Yes....". Our son (now 4 years old) is relatively far with speaking. He does not like it at all, when he is corrected and then ...


12

The best way I've found to help with this is to teach them a song where they use the 1st and 2nd person pronouns along with pointing. They would point to themselves when saying I or me. They would point outwards or to someone else when saying you. They will scan their hand across the room or point to multiple people when saying they, etc. This helped my 3yo ...


12

If you say dadadadada and she repeats it, she is parroting. If she sees her dada and says "dada", then she is talking. Basically, talking is saying something that reflects a shared reality. Children parrot before they talk. Her first word will be when she says something appropriate (usually a noun) spontaneously. Bye (if she's leaving someone), dada when ...


12

Please see this PDF called the Denver Developmental II. It represents normal milestones in development and is used around the world. The white area in each rectangle are the normals; the blue areas are the "late but not off the chart yet". Off the chart indicates a need to probe further. As you can see (I've added the arrows at 22 months), by now he's ...


11

It sounds like your baby is right where she needs to be. Normal babies start reaching language milestones at a fairly wide range of ages. Some babies may hit some milestones early, and others late. You may have reason for concern if your child misses several milestones, but it doesn't sound like that is the case with your daughter. The language ...


11

Yes, it's normal. The speed of speech development varies widely, but all that's expected from a two-to-three year-old is that they form two-word phrases and speak sufficiently comprehensibly to be understood by their parents, which your son seems to be doing just fine. Boys also tend to be slower to pick up speech than girls. Here's a handy milestone ...


11

If you want to encourage his development, spend time with him and talk to him like you would an adult. Speak to him as though he can understand everything you are saying. If you need to go to the gas station or grocery store, take him with you and explain what is going on while you're doing it. Let him hear you speak with other people. He may not like ...


11

The saying I heard since I was a child was "walking by one, talking by two." She'll get there! My son called me 'ball' for quite a while after he could say 'Daddy,' but who gets the lion's share of the kisses and snuggles? :) If you have serious concerns about her development, see your pediatrician. However, this internet stranger's opinion, based on ...


10

This is the sort of issue that happens all the time with toddlers and preschoolers: when sufficiently well rested and fed, they're polite and well behaved, but when something's amiss things go poorly. When this happens with us, we address it by triaging the problem first, and then make a choice based on that result. Why did he refuse to ask nicely? ...


9

You should repeat his sentence but with the correct form of the word. When he says "A boon!" you could say "Yes, a balloon!". Children learn by copying, and this way you're not criticising you're just joining in a conversation and having fun. http://www.nhs.uk/Planners/birthtofive/Pages/Yourchildsspeech.aspx If your child is trying to make a word but ...


9

As a speech language pathologist, I've been trained in treating stuttering. Yet, when my own child became dysfluent at an early age, I was baffled and concerned. Most children go through a period of dysfluent speech (stuttering) between the ages of 2 and 5 years. There is a normal development dysfluency BUT this is also the age that many with TRUE ...


9

I am a language developmentalist and at 18 months of age I would expect an 18 month old child to have between 6 and 20 words of speech. You have to bear in mind that development does not proceed at the same rate in all children and that 18 months is still very, very young. As long as her understanding of spoken language is improving then that is all that ...


8

I was at the University of Alberta while they were doing a 2-week clinic for people (adults) who stutter. The participants that I spoke to said they had made huge progress in that short time. While we were talking, there was very little evidence of a stutter. Some had come to the clinic virtually unable to talk. So, if your child is developing a stutter, ...


8

The best advice is to ask your pediatrician. As well, at least around here, there is a program run by the city called birth to three where they will come evaluate a child for free and then have a sliding pay scale should services be needed. Check to see if your area has something like this. We used them and they were great.


7

As a speech language pathologist, the general rule of thumb is one word is expected at 1 year of age. Some children have many words while some such as dual language learners may be weeks or months later. Your child is not delayed in speaking words. Speech development begins with a child cooing and babbling and moves on to jargon. These milestones are the ...


7

We though our son could hear perfectly too. We could communicate effectively with him, he seemed to hear us from across the room and seemed to have no problems. When he started childcare, we found that he did not learn as much as we'd expected from the group environment and would often ignore the kindergarten teachers. By chance, a doctor mentioned to us ...


7

Anongoodnurse's answer is spot on, but I wanted to add a couple of things. First off, don't forget we as humans are amazing at pattern recognition, to the point that we see it where it doesn't belong. You'll hear her 'say' lots of things that seem like perfect words, once, but not again - because she didn't really say it, she just made a sound that your ...


7

Regarding speech - I was reading an article recently about some research in this area. Scientists divided kids who didn't speak and were about 2-3yo in three groups. All groups had a class where teacher would show cards with animals and say something like "Dog, dog says woof-woof" 1st group had no physical trainings and was a control group 2nd group ...


7

The approach we took with our child was and is to just ask for clarification, or casually correct the word. she responds to something with "uh-huh" and I reply either "I can't understand you, can you please say yes or no?" or if I was sure of her reply, "How about yes?" I have found that making a huge big deal out of it is not especially productive.


7

If you are worried, you should have his hearing checked first. It is not uncommon for Small children to develop a hearing impediment caused by ear infections, which will have an impact on their speech development.


7

My niece used to say "mommy", "daddy" and the name of her older brother. The dog was "puppy". She took a long time to say "grandma" but they all were suspicious that "grandpa" was actually referring to both grandparents because one day she was taken to one of those zoos for kids and all the animals where "puppy" (so "puppy" was actually the designation for ...


6

We had our daughter tested by an audiologist who often dealt with children. Although our daughter was fine, the audiologist told us that most parents bring their children in when it's way too late. Some children had gone years without their problems being diagnosed. As Morah said, speak to a pediatrician but also ask about the option of having your child's ...


6

Screeching is unfortunately a common first means of communication, and I can wholly understand why you want to discourage that. One way to teach it is to encourage her and interact with joy when the makes all other kinds of sounds, to let her know that these are sounds that please you. When she makes these ear-piercing shrieks, show her your discomfort - ...



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