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21

Did you consider writing something on your own? For example, take a look at Tolkien. Take his story and make a chapter of your own, with your own words. Make it a bit easier. Leave out titles that are hard to grasp, and try to create sentences that are as easy as possible. You don't have to be a writer to do this; you can use what's in the book, just ...


14

I'm not disabled myself, but my daughter has cerebral palsy, so I think about things from her point of view a lot. My opinion is that you should give priority to someone waiting who needs a disabled stall, but don't worry about using it otherwise, whether you have small children with you or not. While I appreciate people who go out of their way to help my ...


12

What about comic books and graphic novels? Many pictures, little text (usually) and a lot of true masterpieces. Some classic books are available as graphic novels. And of course there are many excellent original comic books.


11

Considering that many public restrooms place the infant changing stations in the disabled stalls, I think that this is acceptable.


11

Check out some of the things Terry Pratchett has done. Even when he writes for children and young adults and the language is simpler, the ideas communicated is still the same advanced Terry Pratchett ideas. I've read many of his young adult book sand enjoy them just as much as his "normal" books. If your reference to "Mittens the Kitten" is this: ...


8

One excellent supplement to books is to use closed captioning when the television is used. This puts the words being spoken on the screen in tandem with what the child is watching. While it is not as riveting or entertaining as the reading material can be; it helps address the other side which is to help raise the reading ability.


8

I have the same concern with my children with ADD for similar reasons. I found that playing games like Candy Land, Chutes and Ladders, Zingo and as they get a bit older games like Guess Who, Sorry, and games of that ilk really help them. They enjoy the personal experience they have with a parent and they learn to sit, wait their turn, and finish out a ...


8

Aliel, this is obviously very painful for you and for your son, but I think you might be over-reacting to the situation. From what you've written above, these are some of the assumptions you seem to be making, which I think may not be justified: That your 5-year-old son's perception that his teacher is victimising him means that the teacher actually is ...


5

You are not going to get an accurate report on the day's activities in the classroom from a five year old. In fact most 13 year olds don't report accurately on what's going on. I arranged to spend two full days in my child's classroom. I sat at the back, and had a laptop, and tried to work, although I actually found the noise and chaos made working ...


5

It sounds like you might be leaning toward homeschooling. If that's the case, bear in mind that you don't have wait for the end of the year. For our son, we didn't even wait out the week, let alone the semester. We had been pondering homeschooling for a while, but one Wednesday he had a particularly bad day with a substitute teacher, and that Friday was ...


5

As a former preschool teacher I'd like first to point out that toddlers are known for having little to no attention span ADHD or not. As a teacher that spent time in a specialized classroom with middle school students where a majority of my students had severe ADHD in addition to other learning/behavioral disabilities, the first and most important things ...


4

Perhaps look for books for adult learners of English as a second language (ESL). I think some libraries have separate sections for these and they may include simplified versions of adult stories.


4

If you can afford counseling, that might be a good idea. Be sure to find someone with experience with transgender and gay issues. It sounds to me as if your child is having anxieties due to gender and disability issues (something (s)he can't control) and is transferring to something (s)he can control. It will be important to find a place where (s)he can ...


3

One thing that struck me when reading your question is whether or not the bad teacher knows that your son has a speech impediment? My younger brother has some minor physical and perception-related handicaps that are not immediately visible, and people often react with anger because he's clumsy and seems to never notice other people around him, crashing into ...


3

It's important to understant the developmental progress of a child so that you can be sure to set appropriate expectations. For example it's not appropriate to expect a child with the developmental capacity of a 2 year old to sit still or be quiet. Talk with your doctor about the behavioral, emotional, adaptive, linguistic, and motor development of the child ...


3

I don't see why there would be anything wrong with using a disabled toilet, whether you have small children or not. The toilets are there for everyone to use and sometimes you may need to wait to use a toilet because others are using it. A disabled toilet is there to give extra room to a person who may need it, but I don't see why needing that extra room ...


2

When we were traveling, my wife used to take my daughter to the disabled toilet if it was unoccupied - it was just so much easier. That is until I saw a disabled girl needing to go while there were using the toilet and I saw just how upset she got. After that, we avoided using it as much as possible and when we did, we were as fast as we could be.


2

Unfortunately, there still isn't a lot of understanding ab out the causes of SPD. which is probably why you are getting conflicting information about it. Having only been defined in the (70's I think), not a lot of testing has happened (studies in behavior psychology just take longer. There are limitations to what this science can do - particularly when ...


1

It kind of sounds like your child might feel a bit out of control and needs a bit of help forming structure around their life. Something you can do is to sit down with them and discuss solid achievable goals. They need to differentiate between achievable and useless goals. Tell them that having goals, such as being "not good enough", aren't achievable and ...


1

First of, I feel bad for your son going through all this at such a young age. I agree with CreationEdge regarding your first question. "look into the school district's complaint policy. It's time to go over the teacher's head" but you should first make sure(I think you really are) that your teacher actually having mean behaviour towards your son and that ...


1

You discipline them the same as your other kids. Some techniques work better than others, but that's true of any child, and you can't generalize what techniques do or don't work to all special needs children. Mostly what you change is your expectations. Things take a lot longer to learn and you have to cut them extra slack.


1

I'm pushing 40 and I still have these issues. If there was a way to 'learn' how to fix ADD, I'd sure love to see it. ;) Alas, there really isn't. There's coping strategies, though. A big one that really helps all children (and many of us ADD adults) is a consistent schedule. Perhaps set up a daily schedule and put it up on the wall. 8:30 breakfast. 8:45 get ...



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