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11

Don't worry, children will not starve! Unless other wise directed by your doctor due to a medical condition, don't fight over food. If she doesn't want to eat she won't. I do not recommend giving her just what she wants, this may take on a life of its own and make you into a short order cook. Unless you know for certain your child doesn't like what you ...


10

(The tl;dr version: keep trying. Take a break, then try again. And if that doesn't work, try again.) Babycenter would seem to indicate that you're doing all of this correctly: You can introduce solids any time between 4 and 6 months if your baby is ready. Until then, breast milk or formula provides all the calories and nourishment your baby needs and ...


8

If it continues for three full days or more, or if she has a fever, see your family's doctor. It could be anything from an illness to a food sensitivity, or something I haven't thought of. Reduced appetite and unusual tiredness can be normal during a growth spurt, but normally kids sleep soundly when that's the case.


6

With twins, it's going to be chaotic sometimes. Don't worry too much and go with the flow. Try and see what works (the next day it may be all different :-) It really depends on their personalities - one may be fast eater while the other is slow. One may be eager to try out new tastes, while the other reluctant (as you note in your other post). One may like ...


5

When my girl was a baby, berries were on the "avoid" list because at the time, there were fears that early exposure would lead to allergies. More recent thought on the matter though, is that a lack of exposures might contribute to allergies so strawberries have actually been removed from the "no no list" and because they are so nutritious added back into ...


4

When I was feeding my children baby food, I read in a parenting magazine that it takes 7-10 tries of a food before your child knows whether or not they like it. Some foods they like right away, others you have to keep trying. I'm pretty sure I tried this out, and my kids were stubborn enough that if they didn't like it the first time, they weren't ever ...


4

I would treat it like breastmilk, myself. Follow the usual guidelines for how long you can keep breastmilk out at room temperature. Most sources say it's okay for up to 6 hours, if your house isn't too warm.


4

@balanced mama's answer covers everything I was going say, but, I would add that any time you add a new food, you should aim for the purest form of the food. As in, it should be by itself, or, at least have very few other ingredients. Strawberry Yogurt melts typically have several ingredients, many of them processed, and so IF your baby has a reaction to it, ...


4

I think Marie Hendrix's answer to this question will offer you a lot of useful suggestions. I have had a lot of luck getting my son to eat foods by following her advice and making eating more fun for him. One trick that works more often than not is to take turns sharing the food. If my son isn't eating something, I'll take some from his plate, and make a ...


4

I have a set of almost 2 year old twins and here is a list of what worked best for us when they were starting out. Alternate bites We mix up one bowl of the food we are going to spoon feed them and alternate bites. I had them in high chairs next to each other and sat in front of them so I could reach each one at any time. Finger foods We found that ...


4

Being a twin, I've just asked my parents what they did: Use one spoon and feed both twins alternatingly, when only one parent is available. When both parets are there, feed the twins simultaneously. It worked for my parents; my sibling and I survived :-)


3

I'm not an expert (we did BLW but not in a terribly organized manner), but I would tend to say, not very much. Baby-led weaning, from what I know, is mostly about teaching the baby to learn how to eat; and while feeders are nice to use for teething (which is what we used them for), they don't really teach the baby how to eat very well. To the extent that ...


3

Almost certainly, since children at that age change their preferences constantly. My son has been running hot and cold on (eg.) avocados ever since he started eating solids: sometimes they're the best thing in the world, but -- usually after eating them often for a while -- he seems to get bored and refuses to touch them. We pause for a while, try again ...


3

I remember being sick worried thinking why my lo wasn't eating at that age, but that was just a phase. We used to think he was the only child who doesn't like to eat, but after talking to friends and reading online, I found out many babies go through the same stage at that age. Other things I tried at the time and they worked were, change the timings of ...


3

We aren't sure if this is because she does not like the taste or if she isn't ready for spoon feeding. Try different foods (other grains, veggies, fruits) to find out. Even though they are twins, they may have different taste. Don't try to introduce new foods too much too fast, though - children need time to adapt. So approximately one new food per ...


3

Looking at peanut butter... remembering baby poop... not seeing much difference... could you be more specific in what you notice? I've never tried the "Earth's Best" brand, but carrots often cause constipation or other troubles when introduced as a first food. My advice is to wait on carrots until your son has been accustomed to gentler foods (fruits, baby ...


2

I think that what you describe is a fairly normal reaction when introducing solids. Try leaving out these products for a few days and see if the rash goes away. Try another brand (or even other foods) and see if the rash returns.


2

Most doctors do recommend rice cereal as the first food, as there is almost no worry of allergic reaction. As well, most common thought says don't put it in the bottle as there is no benefit to this as it is so thin that it doesn't teach swallowing of solid food. (obviously the twin with major acid doesn't fall into general instruction, as it was given to ...


2

This is probably a question for your pediatrician, since your child's weight gain and other factors affect this. The common information seems to be that water can't substitute for breast milk/formula, and that even the solid foods your infant eats don't give them the complete nutritional set needed. Our son loves drinking water, and we sometimes need to ...


2

Be careful when giving your child water or other liquids that you are still giving the child enough milk/formula. Water is much easier and may comfort your child, but it takes a long time for the child to eat enough food and get enough nutrients from it, so I was very cautious about giving my child water/juice. I would recommend speaking to your ...


2

From personal experience, it depends on the child. Like adults, some kids will happily drink more water than others. What is important is that when they start solids it is important that they start to also drink water to avoid dehydration. As soon as my child began solids we started giving her water in a plastic sipping cup that had been boiled and ...


2

My daughter is officially the world's worst eater. She didn't start really feeding herself until she was well over 12 months old, and her diet is still pretty minimal (but at least we've moved beyond just yogurt as our primary source of nutrition). Here are some thoughts that I try whenever C is in an especially anti-food stage: Is she bored? If you ...


2

Eating off a spoon has to be an unusual experience for them. I imagine that many times you have taken things away from the children that they have tried to put in their mouths, so it must be terribly confusing until they get the hang of the idea. Having said that, the thing that kids do best of all is mimic. So for sure try other foodstuffs, purified ...


2

If by "local rash" you mean a red patch on the chin or something, odds are very high it's got nothing to do with the foods you are feeding him, particularly if it's something like rice that virtually nobody is allergic to. Most babies start drooling at the same age as they start eating solids (in fact, it's considered a sign of readiness), and most often ...


2

The American Academy of Pediatrics no longer recommends avoiding citrus fruit explicitly; see this resource for more detail as to what they do recommend. (Largely, any food.) The primary concerns now are honey (botulism) and nitrates in food (spinach, beets, green beans, squash, and carrots are specifically called out as potentially containing higher ...


2

The only thing I'd add is that yogurt is great for kids, yogurt melts less so because they are usually very sweet. Why are you wanting to give these? If it's because they're good for teething, I'd say that is okay, although odds are you can come up with something better - plain crushed or smaller cube ice is excellent, for example, or any of several ...


2

My boy has gone a few days without pooing once or twice in his 8 months of life. I think up to 4 days at most. We've asked doctors about it, and they say it's not unusual, and everything should be fine as long as they are still passing liquids regularly. If you think about it for a moment, look at how fast your baby is growing, that size is coming from ...


2

Constipation in infants starting solid foods is not uncommon, and may not, in fact, be constipation. If your child is not uncomfortable (no obvious abdominal pain, crying, arching his back, attempting to pass stool without success), and is passing soft stool without difficulty every 5 days or so, it's fine. If, on the other hand, any of the above are ...


1

I always considered a spoon to be the only "food feeder" a baby needs. Why have her learn to use a mesh bag unless that's what she'll use as a grown up? It doesn't make any sense to teach her to use one gadget (which is gross and really hard to clean, BTW) only to have to teach her to use another later. I think the most effective "food feeders" for babies ...


1

As long as you can not see any obvious health issues (coughing, scratching, pain or worse) it is unlikely to be an allergy. If you want to be absolutely sure, you need to see a doctor, however I doubt your little one will love to get about 20-30 needles into his arms for the test. Alternatively you can try small doses of what you think might cause an ...



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