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2

I never thought about it before, so here are a few things that just popped into my mind : You can maybe play "hide & seek" : your wife hide the device somewhere while still connected and your kid has to find "you" back sing-a-long with a little organisation you can probably also read him a book (while your wife turns the pages) have him make and send ...


1

If she's remaining calm and the other person isn't getting mad at her, let her try to resolve the situation herself. If the other person starts getting annoyed or she starts getting frustrated, redirect her and amuse her yourself. It's a good thing for toddlers to have to deal with situations where others don't react the way they want sometimes. It helps ...


1

I'd say let him play on his own as much as he wants to. Make sure he can come and get you guys if he gets distressed, but if he's happy, there's no problem. If he never engaged in social play with adults, or only when adults forced him to, then that could be a sign of a developmental issue. But if he absolutely refused to play alone ever, that would also be ...


-2

I think it depends on the context and age of the child. I doubt a baby would be harmed by witnessing their parents have sex, as long as they aren't having sex with the child. However, an older child might be tempted to imitate what they saw their parents doing, which could lead to inappropriate behavior (eg trying to have sex with a peer). If they do engage ...


1

Your son is logically correct. In the absence of a higher purpose or deity, life is indeed meaningless, The only meaning being the meaning that we choose to give it. If the meaning you live by is just something you've picked out of the air, something you've made up in your head, then that meaning has no reality at all. I would imagine that your son has ...


1

It looks like he came to a reasonable conclusion provided all the information available to him. I am a little alarmed by your statements He spends most of his time alone outside in a forest and the only time I speak with him is when he comes for dinner, breakfast and lunch. When he's home, he rarely talks to me other than on eating occasions. ...


3

You have an astonishingly bright child for 9 years old. In fact, he appears to be so bright, that my response is not one that I would tell a "normal" 9 year old, but rather one that I would tell to an intelligent adult who can make up their own mind. I went through a similar phase myself, except I only came across it in my late 20s, rather than at 9. I ...


0

Like your son, I was very interested in deep philosophical questions from a young age --my own children are the same way. That's just how some people are wired. As he gets older, he'll probably become interested in the vast treasury of literature that composes the philosophical tradition. However, no less an authority than Plato warns against children ...


1

I agree with pulp_fiction's answer - this kid is just a very introverted individual. Don't panic. Try to offer him lots of opportunities to socialize, but do it on his terms. He like science and math? What about clubs or camps. Take him to a meetup at the Smithsonian. Another question is does he like to game? He kind of sounds like a gamer. Try taking ...


1

Life is only meaningless if you require that it should be meaningful for something that trancends human life and humanity, like a god. Re-define meaning as the chosen and self-determined meaning of your own life and it's suddenly meaningful. Your son's example with the 2-hour room is a bad one, since life isn't two hour, and we have a past, and it's not ...


-2

Color me skeptical as well. The son didn't talk until six — presumably that was an ordeal, but this post reads like the mother is considering all of this for the first time. Putting aside my doubt. Sure, life is ultimately meaningless. You still have to engage with the world. There's still joy to be found. Which your son already appears to understand. That ...


9

Show him Star Trek, the original series (Kirk, Spock, McCoy & c.). From episode 1 on. Seriously, if there's a simple way to communicate optimism, inclusion, love for science and empathy for other beings, it is this sci-fi show. Brilliant as he is, he will surely appreciate the ongoing debate between rationality (Spock) and passion (McCoy), and the ...


7

Life is, indeed, meaningless. There's nothing wrong with your kid. I was just like him - I had zero friends and didn't like talking to anyone. Then I gradually began to become more social, and now, in my mid-thirties, I have friends begging to hang out with me every single day of the week. Life is wonderful - but yeah, still meaningless overall. Don't ...


26

Take him to a psychologist. Not because he has a disorder, but because he is highly intelligent and both you and he need to learn how to deal with this gift. Your son needs peers who share his intelligence. I don't know where you live, but any psychologist worth the name knows of local organizations that help highly intelligent children socialize with other ...


6

Oh my GOD! Your son is terrific. He is 1 in a million. Don't push him for anything(at least for now). First delve into his mind and "study" all the things he thinks. If you want to have conversation with him, you are gonna have get into his mindset. First of all, believe what he said is true then question him seriously about the statements and their ...


4

Congratulations - your son has discovered nihilism at the age of nine. My question is - how would you react if an adult you knew and cared about made such a speech? Personally I'd find it an interesting conversation to have, to which I would probably disagree with their position thoroughly. My answer to the nihilist question is 'Life is to be enjoyed, and ...


0

I would first consider the age of the other child who was filling the hole. if the child is of about same age or younger than your son then I would simply assume that if one child is enjoying by digging a hole then other is enjoying by filling it. If your son is hitting the other child for filling the hole then I would ask him to wait and see what the ...


4

So, let's first agree that you can't instruct a child how to behave. It's often difficult to instruct an adult. The question was what are the tools to influence child's behavior. Here they are: personal example, role play, storytelling, training (just like you train dogs;)), consequences. Let's have a closer look how these tools can be applied in the ...


6

You live in a society, where (as has been noted by the previous posters) life is most definitely not fair. Still, we need to be resourceful enough to avoid hitting. Your child hitting someone who is not hitting him - i.e. not a situation of self-defense - is inappropriate. He can't be allowed to solve a disagreement, dispute, or show his displeasure by ...


-2

Not all problems can be resolved peacefully unless you are willing to capitulate and that is certainly frustrating. We make a big deal about fairness, but life isn't fair and neither is everyone you are going to meet. That being said, it sounds by your description of events, that it is generally your child that escalates a conflict to a physical altercation. ...


1

You've hit upon one of the great dilemmas of human society. In school we are taught to NEVER HIT ANOTHER PERSON EVER OR YOU WILL BURN IN HELL! But at the first sign of political disturbance, we declare war. The problem is that "Everything can be resolved through communication" is a lie. Most things can be resolved through communication, but only if the ...



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