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I have a different sleep disorder. It doesn't prevent me from working, but it causes a lot of sick days sometimes. In order to feel my best, I have to sleep 11-12 hours on weeknights and 14-16 on weekends, which means I often don't have a lot of time for anything other than work. Either that, or I am tired all day. Let me put it this way. Sleep seems ...


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This is not medical advice. 1) rule out other factors. Make sure he does not have thyroid problems, sleep apnea, drug or alcohol misuse problems, etc. 2) explain that you are supporting him during his time of illness but that you expect certain behaviours in return. i) he must try to maintain sleep hygiene where possible. ii) he must work hard to help ...


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That seems normal to me. Or rather, one of the many things that can be considered normal. Many babies do feel like they nurse for hours on end, especially ones this young. It's not because there's a problem with you or with the baby, it's just what some babies do. They aren't eating meals and they aren't nursing just for food. Being close to mama and ...


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Young kids, and babies in particular, may often not have consistent sleep patterns (they are, after all, growing and changing so quickly and so constantly; plus, there's that teething thing...). Good sleepers can turn into sleep fighters, and bad sleepers can all of a sudden start snoozing through the night, and that can all change again and again. I think ...


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In the absence of other symptoms such as a raised temperature or difficulty breathing, this sounds like the normal process of a baby learning how to sleep and to self-settle. All humans go through cycles of lighter and deeper sleep in the night, often waking briefly several times. As adults we've mostly learnt to quietly go back to sleep, usually without ...


-2

I am a 49 year-old male and prefer to sleep with another person (was married 21 years), but when no one is there, I often hold a pillow or blanket, or place one behind my back. I had two stated reasons for getting married and one of them was to be allowed to sleep with someone. (You can guess at the other.) I feel that sleeping alone is not normal, and ...


2

Many of the things you describe sound to me like the opposite of fighting sleep. Whining, throwing head from side to side, rolling her body are (seemingly strange) things that many babies do to try to self sooth, i.e. perhaps she is coming into light sleep and does these things to try to resettle and not wake up. So you could see this as a good thing as ...


0

I think moaning , crying, whining are pretty normal when babies wake up from a nap. While babies love to sleep, there are some who just dont like it . One of my twins is always sleeping, whereas the other us just.not interested and with great difficulty would sleep for a few hours. But if you are worried, its better to take them to HV/ pediatrician.


1

I guess its normal. Even.when i was a teen, I used to keep my pillow next to me and used to sleep by hugging it. But mostly it was to reduce my anxiety and provide comfort. Yeah.. So its normal ( hopefully, oe else I am not normal lol)


1

We had similar problems with our daughter, who is now almost 14 months old; she used to wake up during the night to eat, one or two times per night. We tried making routines but didn't notice any significant change. In our opinion she was indeed waking up because she was hungry. We noticed improvements when we managed to give her less milk and more "solid" ...


2

However, this doesn't mean he doesn't look for milk when he wakes at night. I think most sources agree that a 9 month old shouldn't need to feed at night so why is he still looking for milk? He eats reasonably well in the day. My wife still breast feeds our son of 1,5 years old. Its only since a few weeks he doesn't wake up anymore at night to ...


5

I never read any books on sleep and we mostly did our own thing. My personal, unscientific observation is that babies are very different when it comes to sleep, and what works for one child will not work for others. Some parents read a book and works perfect for their kids, and then if it doesn't work for their friend's kid are convinced they are 'doing it ...


3

First off, there isn't a definitive answer, because if there were someone would've made a mint off of selling it. Instead, a hundred different people sell different solutions, largely because each situation is different. Some of what you list above is him expressing his opinion. Why does he not sleep as easily next to you, even recently fed? Because ...


2

Comfort objects are completely normal for small children. Does that mean he fears something? Is he feeling insecure or something?http://scholar.google.co.uk/scholar?q=~child+%22transitional++objects%22 Yes, probably - but that's ok. If he had no fears - of anything at all - then that would be distinctly abnormal. Growing up in the big world is ...


1

As you have asked a while ago: Hope you are better now! But as maybe more parents will check your question and the answers, I'd like to add my five cents. Ida has given an excellent list of hints, most likely your answer can be found there. Practical advice: when your baby wakes up when you put her down, you might be triggering the Moro reflex: try ...


2

From what you describe about the baby's feeding patterns, it sounds like the baby is not actually feeding for the whole time he is latched on. At the start, it can be difficult to tell the difference between nutritive sucking and comfort sucking. You can try feeding the baby in a quiet place and see if you can hear him swallowing. For much of the time that ...


1

Maybe you've already found your answer, but it is possible that your 3 week old was trying to increase your milk supply for the days ahead? Both of my babies nursed a lot (!!) at 3 weeks. I felt like a human pacifier. Then, they went back to the usual 3-4 hour wait between feelings.


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Not necessarily, but you can fix some time table based on his sleeping habits, so that it will be even good for him and you too


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Why do u want to wake up your baby to feed? Does the baby sleep the whole night without waking up? If so, then make sure u give a good feed just before he goes to sleep. There is no need to wake.up the child at night just for a feed. Babies will ask food themselves by Crying if they are really hungry. And just consider yourself really lucky to have a baby ...


1

You actually might not have to wake to feed. Infants will sometimes be able to nurse even while they are sleeping. I would definitely ask your doctor at your 1 month checkup (make sure growth is on track). We had issues and were told to let ours drink as much as she wanted and then let her sleep as long as she wanted unless it was getting close to 5 hours. ...


0

I won't wait the babies cry then feed him,because crying is the late sign of hunger. You can see lots of sign that determine if the baby is hungry, such as they keep on moving their head and mouth (although their eyes are close you can notice that they are looking of something). This probably would happen if 3 to 4 hours have passed. You don't need to ...


0

If your child is okay with it, and you are okay with it, then I think it should not be a concern. I put my 10 year old to bed at 9 p.m. and she has to wake up at 6:30 a.m. That is at most 9.5 hours of sleep, and waking up in the morning is not always easy. I think she would be better off with 30-60 minutes more sleeptime.


2

Put a heating pad in the crib beforehand, let it warm up and remove it just before putting in the baby. Along with the advice about waiting for deep sleep and being gentle, this really helps. Again, do not leave the heating pad in the crib with the baby.


0

I recently had a baby boy (about 3 eeks now). He cries alot between the hours of 10pm to 4.30am almost on a daily basis. I tried several activities based on the advised of Doctors and other health practitioners without any solution. I have now come to realize that if you give him a 'sleeping bath' say around 11pm, he sleeps almost immediately until around ...


1

You are far too nice, and your 7-YO has learned, subconsciously, to manipulate you to get what she wants. Be clear that after 9pm is your time, she will get nothing other than directions back to bed. She is not hungry - you saw her eat dinner. She is not thirsty (leave a bottle of water in the bedroom to halt this complaint) and at 7 she can use the ...


0

Pamela Druckerman in French Children Don't Throw Food believes that babies may cry between their 2-hour sleep cycles and that French mothers wait few minutes for their babies to fall back asleep or take them for a short walk around the house without feeding them. The author described a case of frequent feeding by an American mother as an extreme opposite to ...


1

Offer an incentive to do something extremely boring: Reading from a Chemistry, Math, Philosophy textbook Listening to a poetry audiobook Any Netflix tv show on Quantum physics Beats the heck out of counting sheep, but if it actually stimulates her mind instead of putting her to sleep: you get a genius! You can't lose.


0

My 7 year old doesn't sleep well but I find that this works. I recommend you give her a bath at 7pm to relax her as a shower will wake her up. Then it is time for you and the baby until 7:30. Then take your daughter up to bed after teeth brushing for story time and a cuddle, just you and her. She shouldn't have any food after brushing her teeth or before ...


7

There is little risk of suffocation so long as you place their feet to the foot of the bed, use a hard mattress and keep the bed/cot free of obstructions. The advice for placing a child on their back to sleep is due to a correlation between that and the number of deaths attributed to SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome). SIDS is not suffocation and it is ...


2

You probably need to accept that baby wants to be sleeping with you and learn to simplify the feeding process, such as by co-sleeping. This can last 2 years, but it does end, as @Ida says. To add to @Ida's answer, make sure that your partner is taking a fair share of the load to give you a chance to sleep for more than 20 minutes at a time. This may include ...


10

So this doesn't seem too unusual to me. Many babies prefer to be held, and some more than others. A few suggestions: Have you tried swaddling? The feeling of being wrapped mimics the feeling in the womb, and my babies would not sleep without being swaddled. have you tried a swing? Some babies really like the gentle rocking motion (again, this mimics the ...



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