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As a parent from opposite side of allowing childern to sleep in same bed, I can tell you info from same feeling group of parents: The kid is communicating that something bad happened to them It might be something trivial (like having issues with friend in kindergarten) or something serious (feeling sick, feeling threatened...) You can try to change ...


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We found that the best way to troubleshoot this problem was to closely examine her routines--specifically when she was getting up, when she was taking naps, and what she was doing before bedtime. After reviewing this, a few things became clear: She did not have a consistent wake and nap schedule, waking between 9-11:30 AM and going to bed around 10 PM (but ...


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In my experience 5 months is a little early to even start trying to get a breastfed baby to sleep without the boob. That works better around 9 or ten months, if at all. (The nighttime feeding being the last my kids gave up, at age 13 months for my middle child and at 15 months for my youngest.) That being said, I do sympathize with your desire to help ...


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I would suggest at least initially offering a variety of pillows. Different people have different pillow preferences based on how they sleep; a back sleeper wants a firmer, thinner pillow, a side sleeper wants a firmer, thicker pillow, and a front sleeper wants a softer, middle-thickness pillow, most commonly, but even there you see a huge range. As a ...


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I often used to accompany my Mom when she used to go shopping to buy things for me. This is something I learnt from my Mom when she used to select my pillows when I was a little girl. You should press the pillow before you buy. It shouldn't be too hard or too soft. Children's posture and spine gets damaged if the pillow is too hard or too soft. An ideal ...


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If your baby is still only a few weeks old, try leaving the lights on at night. When my Boy was born we had the same problem. I noticed that he was squinting all day and seemed sleepy in general, then at night extremely alert (his passport picture was taken at 3am!). I came up with the theory that the lights irritated his eyes and made him want to keep ...


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There's not just one answer to that question, because it varies by the child and the situation. Could be 2-3 months, could be much longer (easily could be 6mo+). There's also a second issue with your question: 'waking up to nurse' versus 'waking up hungry'. If they're waking up actually hungry, then you need to feed them (or find a solution to feeding ...


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In our experience, it's very hard to get an infant to sleep without nursing if he/she is in the same room as Mommy, as the infant knows where the milk comes from. We didn't sleep train, but certainly when we needed to share a room (such as during hotel stays) it was much harder to get our sons to sleep as babies than when they were in a separate room. It ...


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It may just be that his body is just not making enough of the sleep hormone melatonin. That could be the simple explanation. Take him to your doctor.


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First and foremost: When a child of that age cries, then that means the child is distressed. The reason we usually cannot let a baby cry is that, over millions of years, crying has become a statement of "something isn't right!" and hearing a baby cry has become a reminder that "something needs to be made right!" It's built-in – both into the baby and the ...


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I never wake my newborn to change a diaper. Poop or pee. If she has diaper rash that would be a different story. Sleep is so precious in the early days.


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I would talk to your pediatrician about this. At around 2 months my son would not sleep for more than an hour at a time if he was swaddled. The pediatrician said some babies are like that and if we can maintain a good room temperature through the night then we should stop swaddling. If the rocking is a full body rock she might not like the swaddle, if it ...


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I think she may be hungry when this happens, but it's not enough to fully wake her because she's swaddled. The swaddle helps babies sleep longer because it suppresses the startle reflex. Without the swaddle she probably would wake crying for food. Not to mention, a 3mo definitely should still be waking for night feedings especially if she's breastfed. ...


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Many babies like tactile sensations on their body when going to sleep, I personally think this is why so many children like a stuffed animal in the bed with them. There's nothing wrong with your baby doing that, maybe its a sign that your baby is seeking comforting sensations. A baby-safe stuffed animal (one that has no buttons or pieces that could be pulled ...


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Besides the other excellent answers on your question: there is a "feature" in our bodies that allows us to ignore hunger and thirst (to some extend) for the first few hours after waking up, presumably so we can go and hunt our breakfast without our stomach interfering. So the behavior of your child seems to be perfectly normal.


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If your child is on the small side, you were probably told to feed him often. Ours were both under 6 pounds, and our pediatrician wanted them fed every two hours until they hit 10 pounds. Man, that was a long 4 months or so for my wife! After that, we fed them on an their schedule, and that was still at least once a night until maybe seven or eight months. ...


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My child was very premature so I spent every single day for 5 months in a NICU and never heard a single doctor say you should wake your child during the night for any reason. They did say if your child sleeps a long time you should slip a bottle in their mouth at around 4-5 hours and let them eat in their sleep. The NICU doctors all said that sleep cycles ...


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If your pediatrician has explicitly told you to wake your baby up, I think you should do that. However, the pediatrician should give you the exact amount of time your baby should have between feedings if that is the case, in my opinion. What I often hear is that you can't expect a baby to sleep through the night with no feedings before a certain age, and ...


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I know a lot of people say 'by so and so age, a baby should be able to sleep through the night'. However, almost every parent I know have reported their babies wake up at least one time a night until 12 months, many longer. (What I suspect is that they don't NEED food at night from a medical standpoint, which tiny babies does). When your wife picks up the ...


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The most simple answer would be to restore the pacifier. Pacifier use up until 12 months or longer isn't any issue If the only thing that has changed is the pacifier let them keep using it. As with most things in life you have to make a choice. Is sleeping through the night, for you, your wife and you child more important than the reason you decided to ...


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I am old school. I am also involved in special education. It is my opinion, that Babies need nutrition for brain development, learning & motor skills. If the baby is in the low percentile weight wise I would feed the baby and not let the baby go more than 7-8 hrs "at night" without a feeding. Infants need to be fed during the day, they need to learn days ...



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