Tag Info

New answers tagged

-1

My husband and I are going through the EXACT same thing. To a T. For a very long time our 2 & 3 year olds slept like angels! We might have had to put them back to bed 1 time, but mostly they went right to bed without an ounce of hassle. For the past month or so our 2 (almost 3) year old will NOT go to bed. We put him down, say prayer, daddy leaves the ...


1

We have a six month old boy, and to me, it sounds like your child may have gas in his stomach, or even some stomach reflux problem (as other responders have pointed out). If it is only gas, patting him while his chest is on your shoulder could relieve the pain. Here's a trick that we found extremely helpful: after breastfeeding, keep the man in an upright ...


0

This is just speculation, but babies can be very sensitive to the mood of the person holding them. If your wife is troubled by this problem then she probably tenses up when she holds the babies, and they sense this and get upset, which reinforces the problem. If so then some relaxation techniques and maybe cognitive therapy for your wife might be beneficial. ...


2

@Stephie nailed it, but I'll add a couple more suggestions. If you don't currently swaddle your son, try it. In the last trimester, babies are crammed quite tightly in the uterus, and tend to find being swaddled snugly to be comforting. We swaddled both of ours as long as we could do so safely. Our elder child didn't sleep until she was two, so we tried ...


3

Your question covers a few points, which is usually discouraged here but as you are a new parent and new to this site I'll let it slip. A few suggestions: If your baby always cries when in a horizontal position, I suggest talking to your healthcare provider. Some babies have reflux problems (similar to heartburn in adults), which can be really painful. ...


-2

If you put a mitten and then a sock in the hand it will help because she or he might take the mitten off.


1

From personal experience which happens to match what Dr. Harvey Karp suggested in the Happiest Baby on the Block: I am much more vigorous with my calming techniques (rocking, shushing, etc.) than my wife is. I believe the baby responds more to me because of that added vigor, especially when the baby is extremely upset. A similar difference in techniques ...


4

Ask your doctor. When babies are very young, they might not wake up when they need to to feed, and fasting through the night could be dangerous.


1

It really depends on the baby. Most seasoned parents would likely let the baby sleep and not disturb the baby. The reasoning being, 'If the baby were truly hungry, he would wake up.' Even adults wake up from hunger. Also, sleep is extremely precious to both parent and child. So by breaking the baby's sleep, you're screwing up a 'good thing' for both ...


0

For the type of swing you have, there should be no problems with your child sleeping in it as long as you follow the safety precautions of strapping them in. I have had multiple conversations with our pediatrician about where our daughter can safely sleep. From one-week-old through her current one-month-old, she has successfully slept in her crib twice. ...


-1

All babies are different with their sleep/feed pattern. I would leave him be, 8pm - 5am is brilliant. Pretty sure he would wake sooner if he was hungry.


1

I personally would not recommend waking your baby up for any reason. When your baby is ready to eat he will let you know. There is no reason to wake him and and force him to eat. The only exception I would say would be a newborn who hasn't eaten yet. Since your baby is two weeks old, I would let him rest as long as he needs to and feed him when he wakes ...


5

This is perfectly normal and you shouldn't try to prevent it. He will soon learn how to roll over on his back again. If you are worried about him doing it in the middle of the night then I would recommend taking out all of the blankets and pillows from his crib. In fact, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics babies shouldn't sleep with blankets ...


6

That's very common. The recommendation is to still put them on their back to sleep, but anything they do under their own power is okay. It's actually when parents try to prevent this that babies get into trouble. Don't try to put pillows or toys or blankets as barriers to rolling over. It probably won't be long until he can roll both ways. In the mean ...


0

No it's not a problem. She's getting enough sleep. She's active when she's awake. And she's happy when she sleeps. There are many places in the world where her afternoon-nap-late-to-bed pattern applies to adults too! Obviously, it might be a 'social' problem if she is supposed to be at school and awake. But (I'm biased), that's a problem with society, ...


2

The process you are talking about is called "sleep training" and there are a lot of approaches to it. In general the aim is to make your child learn to fall asleep on its own. I can refer you to babycenter's sleep problems page where you can find a lot of information about the methods you can use. In general there are two groups of methods: no tears and ...


3

This sort of thing isn't limited to separated parents. My oldest (who's 3.5) is very similar, but with "daycare" in place of the other parent. He naps consistently every day at 12:30 on the nose for 3 hours at daycare (or until recently did; I think that time is going down a bit now that he's older). Best napper they've ever seen - and has since he was a ...


3

Children like routine. A framework allows them to feels safe and then start to explore the world and their place in it. People need routine for good sleep. People who have problems with sleep need to start quite a rigid routine and stick to it. So, try that first. You and your ex should try to agree a routine that you both try to stick to. This will ...


0

It they are ok with the crib bed set so there is no need of a pillow for the kids under 2. It will be suffocation for the kids while using it. If you would like to use the pillow for the LO so you need to wait till they move from the crib to bed. orelse you can use a small pillow while he is still using the crib. So you have to be aware that you should be ...


5

I haven't been able to find anything remotely official (e.g. NIH study), but found this so far: John Pearce and Jane Bidder, authors of "Baby and Toddler Sleep Program: How to Get Your Child to Sleep," warn parents to wait as long as possible to introduce a pillow, preferably until a toddler reaches 18 months of age or later. (src) The main reason to ...


2

When a child under 6 months old cries it's usually to tell us that they need something. They are telling that they're hungry, or cold, or want a cuddle, or in pain. When a child under 6 months cries you probably want to address the problem - change a nappy or provide a feed or do some winding to relieve trapped air or just have a nice cuddle. There is an ...


5

A rule of thumb for how much sleep your child should be getting: at 4 years old a child needs about 11 hours 30 minutes sleep. At 5 years old she needs 11 hours. Both of these are overnight with no day time naps. I got those numbers from this UK NHS website. http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Childrenssleep/Pages/howmuchsleep.aspx Sleep is very important to a ...



Top 50 recent answers are included