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A two year old is able to change her environment to preserve breathing even in their sleep. Young infants aren't, which is why parents don't introduce blankets or loose toys until later on. Don't threaten to take away blankets - it's not worth the fight and is not a health hazard. Just don't use a heavy blanket. Covering her head is perfectly normal, and ...


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The most important thing to do is reassure her that even though this is unpleasant, and it is important it doesn't mean that it is significant (as in something to get worried about). Maybe you could find some books on dreams (vet them beforehand to make sure they will calm her fears, not aggravate them). If she is "traumatized" by the dreams it will ...


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I'm not expert, but didn't we all dream about some bad things. Dreams are some kind of expression especially in 10 year old when they have really big imagination. Those dreams expres some aggression, but i think that's normal... only in dream expressions are multiplied... as brain does not have anything better do to so all is more intensitive. She is ...


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I have same problem with our 2 year old except she takes of her pjs! Iv tryed every way! And iv even done leaving her and watching her during the night and she woke up to cooled don't do this! My partner is medicly trained and was doing core temperter checks hole way through and we woke her and warmed her up. The only thing we can do is while she is in a ...


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Contrary to what you might think, children sleep well with a certain level of noise, especially if it's the familiar sounds of the family doing whatever they usually do or the voices of people they trust. It can be very reassuring, especially for smaller children. That's the reason some parents leave bedroom doors open a small crack: You hear the baby/child, ...


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I wanted to add that babies, while they should sleep on their backs, they may be laid down on their side. This too will seem as if they are still being held in cradle position. This of course after you have verified that the baby is on deep sleep or almost there. It works both ways for me and Yes, it does depend on the baby's mood for that night.


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I have 3 kids 10/7/5 and with all 3 of them when they were around the ages 2-6 when they were overtired they would fight sleep and be very uncooperative at bedtime. So, in my experience it is normal for overtired children to fight going to bed. Professionals agree: From WebMD If your child is overtired, Nicholas Long, PhD, a child psychologist at ...


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Although it's hard to change the way that you've been putting your child to sleep now that it's such an ingrained habit, it's not too late - you can do it. From when they were tiny, I would let my babies go to sleep in my arms and then I'd put them in bed and that's how they were used to going to sleep too. The way that I transitioned them was: Make sure ...


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My pediatrician suggested melatonin for the EXACT SAME THING YOURE GOING THROUGH. It is a nightmare. I'm sorry to be able to relate to your frustration. Try the melatonin. The gummies do not work. Get the liquid and mix it in with a drink or there are quick dissolve. This seems to help my 2 year old. There are nights that it doesn't work at all. I'm TRYING ...


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Children with ADHD often have co-morbid (all that means is that they happen at the same time) conditions, such as OCD; up to 25% of kids with ADHD may have OCD as well. It's very commendable that you're in touch with your child about this and you are understanding and open with him. Your experience would be the same with an adult with OCD as with a child. ...


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I stutter. I started when I was 5 or 6, around the time my dad became unemployed and we needed to move across the country. I did speech therapy for all of elementary school and part of middle school, until I was no longer improving. I was never cured, but did learn to communicate in a way where my speech impediment isn't obvious in most situation. I'm able ...


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Actually you may be asking two separate questions, I will only address the sleep issue. Cause Try to look at the situation like this: Your child needs to get X hours of sleep on an average night You let your child sleep till 11:30 Now suppose that your child appears to need 10 hours of sleep every day, given his average wakeup time you would expect him ...


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About the stuttering, like John Yost's comment, you should help your son stop it as soon as possible before he get used to speak like that - then it hard to change, especially when he get older. About the sleep patterns, maybe get him sleep at 9pm (or a bit later depend on his old bedtime routine) and wake him up at 7am (or a bit later, again depend on his ...


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You need to have your son assessed by a licensed Speech-Language Pathologist. It is important that your son gets treatment for his stuttering before the age of 11, regardless of the cause. Studies indicate that after 11 years of age it is much harder to remediate. Keep in mind that 11 is just a typical number based on a standard population. You can find an ...


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Not getting enough sleep can lead to sleep being more restless, and waking up. If he isn't getting a nap, try getting him to take one, or move bedtime earlier. Make sure his room is conducive to sleep. A comfort item, a nightlight, a few toys but nothing too stimulating. I know this can be harder for parents who are limited on space, but if possible, ...


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My seven-year old (boy) is the same --and I was the exact same myself as a kid. My biggest piece of advice would be to not do the second dinner. A full stomach makes it harder to sleep, and no child who gets three meals a day is starving. For my son (and myself) plenty of exercise is a huge key to good sleep, preferably throughout the day, but right before ...


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I have an eight month old who used to do this same thing. What worked for me: Give him five minutes or so before going to him. A lot of times, my baby would be at a light point in her sleep cycle, and start stirring and crying, but would still have her eyes closed. If I would let her fuss for a few minutes, she would often move back into a deeper sleep ...



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