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1

My son was a bed wetter until he was 8 and his father and I split. I mean it stopped as soon as he left. Maybe stress?


1

It really should pass, however I know that the addition of shame can prolong and even make the issue worse. Waking her up with break up her sleep and make her more tired. My experience is that bedwetting is best solved with rewards and celebration of success. Ultimately if it continues to 10+years old there may be trauma that is contributing to the ...


0

Anyone considered speaking to your gp or school nurse about this? My daughter was about 7-8 yrs old when I stsrted having issues with her not sleeping, she would sing, talk to herself, read books out loudly etc, I finally got her seen by the doctor and sge was referred to a phycologist who ran some tests and we discovered my daughter has severe adhd ...


4

My wife is the school nurse at an outdoor school (sixth grade camp) and this problem is very common among the sixth graders (10-11 year olds) she sees. They've developed procedures so these kids can attend successfully without the other kids knowing. As annoying as this is, it will pass. Adding shame, even unintentionally, will help nothing and hurt a lot. ...


6

Bed wetting, even at 7 years old, is common. About 1 in 40 children at that age wet the bed. Children usually grow out of it. Stop waking her in the night. That doesn't help. Make sure she is drinking plenty in the day time. This will help her train her bladder. She should reduce the amount she drinks in the evenings. Make going to the loo last thing ...


1

For us it's been about routine. We do the same thing every night; dinner, bath, story, bed. Part of it is that learning to go to sleep is actually a thing, especially if you're not particularly tired. In times when we've changed timezones we've used exercise to great effect, and general stimulus; cutting out TV since that uses fewer calories and less brain ...


0

The typical reading a story helped me. For whatever reason, I decided the "Phantom Tollbooth" would be fun to read to her at that age. The irony of her falling asleep in the Doldrums! It seemed that a calm, peaceful voice in a structured setting (i.e. her listening and not talking since I was reading) helped mellow out her hyperness. Our psychiatrist ...


5

Something's scary up there. While typically the imaginary monster is under the bed, sometimes you can trick it by sleeping somewhere else. (If I were a scary monster and couldn't find the kid I was planning to eat, I'd look on the floor next to the bed... luckily, monsters are stupid and rarely read Parenting.SE.) Generally I'd expect/hope that she'd ...


0

I suggest spirited games of "monster", "hide-and-seek", or any other game that get that child to run for an hour+. You'd might be amazed how quickly they crash. I was forced to take a kettle bell class in order to have the stamina for the games; the health benefits were an unexpected bonus.


2

Our baby was full term but smaller than usual (5 lbs 6 oz, 4lbs 11 on discharge). The pediatrician advised us to feed her every 2 hours which we essentially did even through the night. (I breastfeed so this frequency also really boosted my supply.) Though most times she would ask to feed, there were times I had to wake her to feed without demand, in order to ...


-2

Your Baby will tell you when he/she is ready to stop swaddling. They will start to roll or kick and squirm out of the swaddle. The real question is are they ready let go of the need for swaddle even though they can escape the swaddle? You will know this as well as they will not sleep as well or as long. Sometimes the moro reflex will continue to wake ...


0

Put the heat up in his and/or room and if that dose not work than tuck them in tight it worked for me when I was a kid.


0

Hungry ? (She drinks her last bottle of milk around 8pm.) Could well be hungry. Offer her more milk (when she cries in the night) and see if it helps. Maybe teething? (every night, don't think so) Could be every night. Tried teething gel? Tried baby painkiller e.g. Calpol Infant? On a scale of 1 to 10 (where "1" is "I am mildly concerned ...


2

This sounds like a pretty classic case of "night terrors", named not because the baby is terrified, but because he appears to be terrified. Typically, it is seen in preschoolers (as early as 5 month, but peaks at 3.5 years of age) occurs at the same time after falling asleep every night in the early part of sleep happens during deep non-REM sleep when ...


0

As a child, I experienced this frequently. It turned out to be night terrors which caused hyperventilating which worsened the night terrors and so on... One thing that my mother did with me was tell me to imagine myself falling asleep in a superman cloak which was impervious to everything. Children are incredibly susceptible to suggestion. I think this ...


0

Answering my own question here: What worked was getting her to eat more. The main trick in doing that was to give her one thing at a time. in reverse order of desirability. So, if we had spaghetti and meatballs, we would first give her some vegetables to eat, then some meatballs and lastly the yummy creamy pasta. This way she would eat vegetables until ...


1

We have a neck pillow with no padding at the back, just a length of fabric holding two kidney-shaped pillows together. It worked so well for the toddler I ended up buying a bunch more, so the whole family has their own to use as travel pillows. I'll post a picture later. It was made by a local SAHM-business and we got it years ago, but similar things may ...


1

We also have this problem. It helps a bit if the child seat allows a bit of recline, and if it has an impact shield aka a 'wedge' (instead of a harness) then that means that if the seat is in the upright position then the child can sleep leaning forwards on the shield. We have this type here: ...


2

I have a different sleep disorder. It doesn't prevent me from working, but it causes a lot of sick days sometimes. In order to feel my best, I have to sleep 11-12 hours on weeknights and 14-16 on weekends, which means I often don't have a lot of time for anything other than work. Either that, or I am tired all day. Let me put it this way. Sleep seems ...


1

This is not medical advice. 1) rule out other factors. Make sure he does not have thyroid problems, sleep apnea, drug or alcohol misuse problems, etc. 2) explain that you are supporting him during his time of illness but that you expect certain behaviours in return. i) he must try to maintain sleep hygiene where possible. ii) he must work hard to help ...


0

That seems normal to me. Or rather, one of the many things that can be considered normal. Many babies do feel like they nurse for hours on end, especially ones this young. It's not because there's a problem with you or with the baby, it's just what some babies do. They aren't eating meals and they aren't nursing just for food. Being close to mama and ...


0

Young kids, and babies in particular, may often not have consistent sleep patterns (they are, after all, growing and changing so quickly and so constantly; plus, there's that teething thing...). Good sleepers can turn into sleep fighters, and bad sleepers can all of a sudden start snoozing through the night, and that can all change again and again. I think ...


0

In the absence of other symptoms such as a raised temperature or difficulty breathing, this sounds like the normal process of a baby learning how to sleep and to self-settle. All humans go through cycles of lighter and deeper sleep in the night, often waking briefly several times. As adults we've mostly learnt to quietly go back to sleep, usually without ...


-2

I am a 49 year-old male and prefer to sleep with another person (was married 21 years), but when no one is there, I often hold a pillow or blanket, or place one behind my back. I had two stated reasons for getting married and one of them was to be allowed to sleep with someone. (You can guess at the other.) I feel that sleeping alone is not normal, and ...


2

Many of the things you describe sound to me like the opposite of fighting sleep. Whining, throwing head from side to side, rolling her body are (seemingly strange) things that many babies do to try to self sooth, i.e. perhaps she is coming into light sleep and does these things to try to resettle and not wake up. So you could see this as a good thing as ...


0

I think moaning , crying, whining are pretty normal when babies wake up from a nap. While babies love to sleep, there are some who just dont like it . One of my twins is always sleeping, whereas the other us just.not interested and with great difficulty would sleep for a few hours. But if you are worried, its better to take them to HV/ pediatrician.


1

I guess its normal. Even.when i was a teen, I used to keep my pillow next to me and used to sleep by hugging it. But mostly it was to reduce my anxiety and provide comfort. Yeah.. So its normal ( hopefully, oe else I am not normal lol)



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