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11

Well, you don't need to do anything, but the sooner you can comfortably get your family to a regular sleep routine that both you and your kids can count on, the happier you'll all be. We got both of our kids to where they could be in bed, (quiet and seemingly happy) by the time they were about five months old. It was hard, especially for my wife, but ...


10

Is it possible that she is afraid? This is the age when children usually start to be afraid of things, and especially of darkness. Ours did too, although it was not so problematic as your case. So try to discover the underlying reason. If it is fear, first of all, if her room is too dark, you should install a night light. This helps to gradually make her ...


9

A lot of parents hate giving up that extra hour in the evenings, but the best way to get your son to wake up an hour later is to put him to bed an hour later. 15 month-olds just plain don't need as much sleep as 5 month-olds. The great and terrible thing about parenting is that as soon as you get one part down, it changes. Other than that, we generally ...


8

Our son was the same. Have you tried using a night light? We started with one that was rather bright, but not so bad that it would ruin his sleep. Then after a while we moved to a smaller one, in the corner of his room. The whole process took weeks, and included rewards for nights spent with only the night light.


8

In this circumstance I am a fan of the idea of a "sleep reminder," which I first read on an internet bulletin board. A sleep reminder is something that will stop your baby from playing and indicate that it is nighttime. A sleep reminder has two related goals: Get your child to stop playing and sleep. Continue to promote independent sleep, if that is a ...


7

Why Short Naps Happen Inability to Handle Partial Wakings Your child is waking up after reaching the light sleep portion of a sleep cycle. If your 4 month old learns to fall asleep independently through some form of sleep training - the level of crying sleep training needs to involve can be up to your family - then it may solve this problem. The drive to ...


5

You could give the little one a wind-up torch, to have nearby when he wakes up in the night. If you charge it before he goes to sleep, he can use it when he wakes up. A torch has the specific job of dispelling the darkness - rather different to toys which just light up when turned on. This distinction might have some psychological value.


5

Our youngest wanted a light so we got a teddy bear that glows gently for ten minutes before fading out and turning itself off. This was bright enough to keep her happy - she could cuddle it close, dim enough that it didn't disturb her sister, who was in the same room, and didn't require us to come and turn it off. If she wakes in the night, a quick ...


5

Most babies have growth spurts at 7-10 days, 2-3 weeks, 4-6 weeks, 3 months, 4 months, 6 months, and 9 months approximately. I don't think it's comfort feeding since, when you put her down without feeding her, she wakes up again a few minutes later. I'd be more inclined to believe that she's either gearing up for or in the middle of a growth spurt and ...


5

For a newborn, no this is not a problem at all - it is perfectly normal. Your baby has spent the last few months held really tightly, so this new world is definitely a shock to the system. What many parents do is move to swaddling - with the arms tightly wrapped - to help baby sleep easily. It actually sounds like your baby is doing quite well - many won't ...


5

Babies are unique individuals. Some babies certainly do learn to fall asleep on their own very quickly. Others don't. My first one still doesn't fall asleep very well - at 2.5 years old. My second one goes to sleep very well - not perfect, but probably average or above average. In terms of age-related steps, the biggest one is solid foods. Once the ...


4

Make sure there's no reason for him to wake up. The temperature is suitable, and he's tucked in well. His blanket and/or sleeping sack covers him and isn't tangled around him. The room is totally dark, except perhaps a small nightlight. Your home is as quiet as you can reasonably make it. Perhaps add ambient sounds? Our toddler also had a period of ...


4

I always do it like this: Say to him he is going to bed. He doesn't want to because he is playing (somethings he wants to himself). I let him put down his toys by himself, telling him to do so. I have a moment of patience, but when it takes too long, i pick him up and put his toys down for him. Most of the time he chooses to do it him self. I let him kiss ...


4

As I see it, there are two ways to approach this one: Approach Number One: Embrace your Snuggler My daughter was very much like this when she was a baby. Desperate for a break once in awhile I tried "crying it out" but since she also had reflux, she just got herself worked up so much she threw up all over her crib. It took less than a week for me to look ...


4

There are a wide variety of "cry it out" techniques. I am vigorously opposed to most of them. Some of the 'gentler' techniques are valuable for sleep training. They work within two weeks, they do not allow the child to get too distressed, and they support the parent and child through a short but difficult transition. "Cry it out" is the term used for the ...


4

We did not "sleep train" in the sense your husband is referring to and our daughter is now a fabulous sleeper (at seven). Idon't think it is required (nor do I think it means automatically happier kids or more engaged parents). However, as with all things there are trade-offs to be considered on either side. In my experience if you sleep train through ...


4

In our experience, it's very hard to get an infant to sleep without nursing if he/she is in the same room as Mommy, as the infant knows where the milk comes from. We didn't sleep train, but certainly when we needed to share a room (such as during hotel stays) it was much harder to get our sons to sleep as babies than when they were in a separate room. It ...


3

It may be worth trying controlled crying. I'm told this is often effective from about a year onwards. Trying this with our one-year old we had to endure 1 terrible night, 1 bad night, 1 ok night, then she was sleeping through. It feels cruel, but it does seem to work. Now when she cries in the night we know there's something really wrong, like a dirty ...


3

To add to the above excellent answer. About middle of the night wake ups: Go to her and have her try to verbalize why she woke up. This is the time when nightmares start. Also try to think what was introduced to her that day that could, in a child's mind, become a nightmare. Then come up with a solution to her problem. For example, my 4-year-old woke ...


3

Lots of GREAT advice here....just wanted to add: What we do with our 3 year old son, based on what we read in an article, when he has a nightmare: we tell him, "It's over now," as opposed to "it was only a bad dream." Saying it was only a dream creates a barrier between the two of you -- the child isn't old enough to fully understand that you can take the ...


3

Most of the work you will need to do for this is during the day. Lots of tummy time - at least as often as he eats in the day. When he is on his tummy hold a toy in front of him and bring it around in his periferal vision until his head tilts so far back that it flips his body over on his back. This will help him learn how to flip and get used to the feeling ...


3

Somewhat counter intuitively, I seriously recommend you look at his daytime sleep. The kids at that age need a solid - up to 2h - daytime nap. If they don't get that, it can really impact their night time. This was our experience - twice. It takes a bit to wrap your head round, I admit! I'm not suggesting this is an authoritative guide but has some food ...


3

I lived through the same situation when my daughter was a baby. Some ideas that I found helpful were tightly swaddling her in a blanket (I think it helped minimize those jerky movements babies sometimes make when sleeping, inadvertently waking themselves up), using a fan to generate white noise in the bedroom, putting a warmed cherry-stone pillow in with her ...


3

Having a comfort object that helps fall asleep is not a bad thing for a child. While it's certainly possible that he/she will play with that object more as he/she grows, for most children that's not a huge problem; in fact, the ability to quietly play while going to sleep is very helpful, as it helps the child calm down sufficiently to fall asleep. My ...


3

Our daughter continued breast feeding until she was over 2. The way we stopped was to provide her with warm milk as a substitute and simply to say that "Mamma's milk has stopped." She was old enough to understand what this meant, and accepted it. In don't think it is a bad habit. Plenty of studies show the benefits of breast milk (so long as you are willing ...


2

There are a variety of clocks available for toddlers which signal to them when it is okay to get out of bed. The idea is similar to what Morah Hochman suggested, but is built into the clock. Many of the clocks also provide ambient sounds and other sleep aides besides indicating that it's okay to get out of bed. A friend of mine used the Okay to Wake clock ...


2

I also beleive that if you leave him some quiet toys to play with in his bedroom he will play by himself for that extra 45ish minutes. Put a digital clock in his room and above the hour number make a sign that says 6. Tech him that when the numbers match he can come get you.


2

It's possible that this is just a sleep regression - you yourself mentioned the "eight month crisis" (sometimes known as the 9 month sleep regression, but the timing varies by kid) which is a common time for bad sleep. With these "the only way out is through;" it's quite possible that no matter what you do the wakings will continue until the underlying ...


2

If he is crying anyway cry it out seems to be the way to go. When he awakens, check his diaper, if he is cold, etc but don't look at him, don't come right out and snuggle or rock him and don't make eye contact and don't say anything. You have checked and he is okay so let him go back to sleep on his own. The other thing I would check is sleep tremors. He ...


2

Have you got an established bedtime routine? My daughter was difficult until she learned key phrases "8 o clock" - "bedtime" - and "sleep sleep milk milk" or "bed bed". Sometimes if she is ill, or overexcited there may be protest, but normally she will walk to her bedside herself. Myself or mummy tuck her in, give her the tous (saying there names), and she ...



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