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2

Only you can decide whether or not any problems arising from contact to his father outweigh the benefits. However, in general I believe it is important for a child to have contact with both parents, to the extent possible and practical. From your question it is unclear if there is behaviour by the father that poses a danger to your son (such as violence or ...


1

You might try allowing contact via email (or "snail" mail), a way which is safer and hopefully less threatening for your son than face to face or a phone conversation. Maybe you could invite your ex to write your son an email (through one of your addresses so you could monitor what is going on) and if your son eventually wants to write back (don't give him ...


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Your son has been hurt by your ex. It is completely understandable that he doesn't want to interact with someone who has caused so much pain. Relationships don't come equipped with a magic reset button. Just because your ex has made some changes in his life doesn't mean he gets a pass from your son for the last 7 years. He has lost your son's trust. If ...


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It seems like your son has a valid reason to be upset. Maybe if his dad demonstrates changed behavior over a long period of time, your son will be ready when he's older.


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You answered yourself when you mentioned she has 'autism', high functioning or not. My nephew who has a more serious level of autism also finds it hilarious when my brother gets angry at him. He seems to enjoy egging my brother on as well, almost provoking angry outbursts. Laughter, to some extent, is better than if she begins to have meltdowns herself. Best ...



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