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17

There's been no research that I know of connecting early sign language learning to speaking sooner or better in general. However, learning sign language can make a huge difference in diagnosing speech disorders early enough to treat aggressively and successfully. By age 3, my son couldn't even say "mama" or "papa". After checking his hearing, oral muscle ...


6

It is probably different between children, but I will tell you our experience: Before we had our first child, we thought parents who taught their kids "sign language" was weird. We weren't planning on teaching our kids how to sign. When our first child was one year old, we would take her to the library and she would grab some board-books - the ones she ...


5

The two we started with first have been 'diaper change', and 'milk'. Our thinking was, focus on those words that will let our daughter express her needs as early as possible. She's only 9 months old though, and just hinting at signing diaper change when she needs one.


5

Yes! Research does indicate that hearing children who learn sign language talk more than their same-age peers. Here is a resource for the study. http://deafness.about.com/od/babysigning/f/signspeech.htm The study involved 103 11-month-old hearing babies. The babies were divided between a group learning sign language, and a group that did not learn ...


4

Just as the others have noted, we too used sign when our kids were small to reduce frustration. Now, that they are older (7&9), we use sign language to give them silent cues (remember thank you!) or ask questions at a distance without drawing attention (hungry? bathroom? ready to go? come here!).


4

We used Signing Time DVDs for our children and it's great. They have Baby Signing Time (which our toddler grew out of pretty quickly), and then just regular Signing Time. A 20-minute DVD is part of our 2-year-old's every-day morning routine, and she loves it. She doesn't think she's learning, she just likes to do Signing Time. Our local library has quite of ...


3

You may be confusing happiness or satisfaction with emotional health, the two are not the same things. Emotional health is another name for mental health, where good is simply the absence of a disorder. What you are really asking is if teaching your child sign language is likely to prevent your child from having mental health problems, the answer to which is ...


3

"More" Bunch your fingers together, on both hands, and tap em together. It's a gross motor skill which makes it 'best' in my opinion. My experience with this was . . . surprising. I'm not much on ASL, but my first wife worked with disabled and was 'proficient' so i was a more than a bit familiar. One day, my 2 yr old walked over to me sitting at the ...


3

Sources- Talking Hands by M. Fox & an ASL class I took. I see you are sold on the idea of raising a bilingual kid-- me too, baby just arrived last month, and we're doing Russian, English with ASL. Since I live up the road from Gallaudet, I thought might as well learn real ASL and not baby ASL. Baby ASL is anywhere from 20-50 signs that are used just ...


3

Like David said, signing may or may not improve verbal communication. And if you're not careful, you can run into the problems efalcao mentioned. That being said, I think teaching your infant/toddler/child to sign is a wonderful idea. We started with our first child at 6 months (and it wasn't just signing, we also talked and sang to her as much as ...


2

I'm not sure, but I can give you one example where signing hurt us: Our kids first and most-used signs were "please" and "thank you." We'd frequently say "can you say thank you?" and they'd sign it and we'd smirk in our triumph of parenting. ....Well, nowadays (at about 2 years old) they can say a lot of words, but we're unable to get them to actually say ...


2

We used and can highly recommend Sing & Sign DVD's - my son loved it. In the U.K. there are also group meetings and an online resource. "Sing and Sign's original and unique approach has revolutionised baby signing in this country. Everyone knows nursery rhymes and action songs are great fun and musical activities help stimulate language ...


2

We found a book (not sure how widely available) called, not surprisingly, "Baby Sign Language, A Practical Guide to Signing with your Baby" by Alison Mackonochie published in 2008 by Parragon that I would recommend. It has big photos of how to do a fairly comprehensive list of signs. We have tried to teach our son some practical signs as well as some fun ...


2

I disagree with your book's suggestion. Children don't learn spoken language by their parents focusing specifically on one word until that's mastered. Instead, learn a small group of simple signs and use them consistently. Just as with a child's first spoken words, the first sign can be individual. The practical signs like those people have suggested: ...


2

More is easy and handy. But then your young toddler will use it whenever it might be remotely useful, and suddenly you find yourself dealing with a constant torrent of "more, more, more" signed at you. For that reason I think the book that recommends "please" as a good first sign is very useful. That way when your child is demanding something, they are ...


2

My son signed "milk" yesterday-- although he hasn't done so in context. His first word was "Mam", which he used exclusively to mean he wanted milk. So under the theory that kids talk about what they care about, milk is on the top of the list. I take it you are doing baby sign language (20-50 signs to smooth communication until they can talk). That said, ...


1

We started with just signing ourselves for awhile. ASLpro was not known to me then, but I've used it since and it is a WONDERFUL resource. I recommend it to you now. At about 5-6 months we introduced "my baby can talk" videos to Alice. When she was about 18 months to two years we added the "Signing Time" Videos, but she still often wanted the "my baby ...


1

I'm currently in the process of learning ASL to teach my upcoming child. Most baby ASL systems are recommending parents learn about 50 words used as one or two word setences, without really any intention of learning full ASL, which has upward of 10,000 signs and a grammar that is as complex as any foreign language. In a world where small things have small ...


1

Being a mother of twin boys, we taught them ASL signs with an awesome DVD series starting at 2 months. I believe the DVD series was called 'Signing Time'. If anything, it was amazing being able to communicate with them sooner which alleviated many frustrations. It bridged a gap until they could start using their words. When they can't say it, they sign it. ...


1

There are all sorts of advantages to teaching your child ASL that especially apply during the first two years of life. These advantages include an average (spoken) vocabularly larger than that of non-signing peers of the same age as well as an even larger vocabulary in sign than their non-signing peers have, earlier and clearer communication development (on ...


1

Our daughter learned many signs on her own by looking at children's board books that showed the signs. Sometimes we would read the books with her and show her the sign and point to the picture on the page, but most of it she picked up on her own. We just went to our library and got a few books in the board-books section that dealt with baby signs. Here ...


1

We used signs from around 6 months. They are from a community course and are baby-suitable adaptations of the German signing language. Here are the ones we use most, in the order in which we introduced them: Milk: hold a hand in the thumbs-up gesture and then open and close the four fingers several times. This looks like grabbing the bottle. More: hold ...


1

This site has a video dictionery of ASL signs, but no direction on which ones to start with. I recommend starting with the word "more"/"again".


1

Here in Austria, there is the concept of a community college where the general public can enroll for specific classes on a wide range of topics. One such topic was baby sign language (which is completely different from deaf people's sign language!). You can also ask your pediatrician or even the local library for references about such classes in your ...



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