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18

Going through strollers for 5 kids (2 of which are twins), we've been learned quite a bit about what is good and what isn't. When it comes to price, here is what we've learned: Avoid the ultra expensive primary stroller - We test drove some ultra expensive strollers, and have had friends who have owned them, and there wasn't a single thing that the ...


13

Time to buy a money box/'piggy bank' We bought our son a Thomas the Tank Engine money box and we often randomly give him the small change from local shopping trips. He enjoys putting the coins into his money box and pretending to count the money occassionally. Now, when we go shopping and he latches onto something he likes the look of, we simply ask "okay, ...


12

I suggest a simple habit. Never buy toys on impulse; no matter how difficult the merchandizers make it for us. (Toys in the check out lane, really?) Each time explain that the child can think about getting the toy and give reasons on the following day. Let them know that if you approve of the reasons, on the next trip to the store you will get the toy if ...


9

I think an expensive stroller is definitely worth it, but only because good quality costs money. There are some silly-expensive brands out there that are worrisome in terms of ergonomics, for both the child and/or the parent; avoid those. And then some strollers are expensive simply because they're made right. The stroller shouldn't start to fall apart ...


8

We did buy special soap for our first child (it is very expensive) but by the time the third and fourth came around we didn't have time to wash their clothes separately and we found it completely unnecessary. I would use regular soap (without perfumes) and see what happens. If your child seems to be having a reaction (rash) then speak to the Doctor about ...


8

I believe that the suggested age range is almost exclusively dictated by the risk of swallowing parts and other dangers. Generally, if my child has any kind of (safe) pleasure out of a toy, then I would not hesitate to let him play with it. Who cares if it's designed for a three-year-old? If my 2yo likes it, I won't stop him. (And it gives me a (false?) ...


7

Back when our little one came along we faced the same issue, so I'll share some of my experiences. Price Does Not Indicate Quality We discovered that some of the expensive strollers were really not any better than some "cheaper" strollers, so price is not a good indicator of quality. Get a "Stroller/Carseat" Solution Some strollers are more of a "complete ...


5

I find that I need to closely evaluate where my child is preforming (schools can help with this). Two of my children had excellent fine motor skills at a very young age and therefore were able to do some toys (such as beading) much earlier than recommended. As well, and possible more to the point, there is a law change about what is require at age three and ...


4

I would recommend a travel stroller one that can be used when the baby is older. Ours was around $200 my son used it all the time until he was around 2 or so. He still used it most of the time until he was 3. He still on occasions tells me he does not want to go to the store and I will offer the stroller and his Explorer or some books and he is much happier. ...


4

Our experience as first-time parents was: it's a bad idea to buy a lot of stuff up-front at all, and when you do buy, it's probably best to always buy the moderately-priced version first and only upgrade if you discover you have to. The issue is that parents and kids are different. Some things that other parents say their child loved, our child would have ...


4

Our twins just turned 5. Here are some things that worked for us. Pardon the long list, our twins have very different temperaments and we've found that very different things work for each of them: One responds better to talking, and the other needs consequences before the talking sinks in. I'm also giving our tactics for dealing with the rudeness that I ...


4

I'm facing the same problem and there's a hidden problem here that lurks hidden in the dark: Constant want and depression. A child that will get everything he/she wants will become a depressed child. I see it with mine. I don't know any other 8 year old who has the following (for the asking): XBOX 360 with Kinect, newest iPod Touch, iPad, his own computer ...


4

Greenmountain sells diapers that come in sizes of upto 40 lbs. You can probably just get away with just the large size, but if you're more comfortable, use the extra large. If it's too big on your baby, you can fold it (that's what we did) at the top. Are you into sewing? If so, you can also sew your own pre-folds. Word of caution: Our daughter is 13 ...


4

Here are some things we do with our 4 year old: If we are shopping with my son and he is going to get something we ask him to take the item and the money to the teller / cashier himself. In this way he can see how the transaction involves money being spent and it doesn't come back. The same as Ethel mentions in her answer, we explain that money is earned ...


4

Manufacturers typically list an age range that a typical child of that age could utilize most or all of the features of the toy in the way the manufacturer envisions the toy being played with. This may or may not match your personal considerations of what you find age-appropriate. For example, when my son was 7 months old we purchased a plastic toy keyboard ...


3

We find that the age guides are a bit of help from a safety perspective, but we can judge ourselves what we know will be safe for him. For our boy, anything that he can crawl on top of needs supervision, since he became obsessed with trying to walk since he hit 8 months old. Therefore, things that are suggested for his age aren't necessarily safe for our ...


3

The desire of the human flesh is what we all need to learn to overcome. Your child doesn't understand math and doesn't understand where the money comes from either. So he's not going to understand the value that money represents. The value that your child needs to understand, is the value of patience. You can start teaching them this at home. Here's what ...


3

I've often heard the advice to dress like an onion: We've learned from sports clothing that it's practical to wear several layers of relatively thin clothing, so that you can peel off layers according to the temperature. Here's an example: Undergarments should be able to transport moisture away from the skin; then have a layer of e.g. cotton clothing ...


3

What we did successfully with my kids from 4 (from 3 with the youngest) was to let them know that they could spend their weekly allowance (at that age 20 pence) and earned pocket money on something 20p or less, or save it to get something bigger that they want. Our youngest is now 5 and she is perfectly capable of saving her 50p a week for a few months to ...


2

A stroller is entirely optional if you only have 1 small child. Infant carseats typically snap in and out of a base that is secured in your car. This works well for bringing a sleeping baby in to a store or in to your home. You can buy drop-in strollers for these carseats, but they're not necessary. I always carried the carseat in by hand. It's easier to ...


1

Both of our children have sensitive skin (to the point that it seems like looking at their skin cross-eyed causes a breakout, and they would have rashes anywhere the clothing would touch) and we switched our whole family to Charlie's Laundry Soap (you can get it on Amazon for approximately the same cost as other detergents) on our pediatrician's ...


1

I'm from the US, so I'm not familiar with the brands available where you live. Here, though, the most popular "baby detergent" is Dreft. If you compare the ingredients in Dreft with most other laundry detergents, you don't find much of a difference. I have the feeling that the same thing would be true of baby detergents in the UK. I agree with @morah; ...


1

We've had some really bad experiences with stroller shopping that were somewhat different from what other people have posted, so I'd like to point out a few things. Price is not how you shop for strollers. Our first single-kid stroller was $400 for a "Travel Solution" that included the stroller and infant car seat. It was a rebranded Graco that was sold ...


1

We have two children of our own and operate an in-home childcare, so we have had some experience with good and not-so-good strollers. When our first child was born, we were given a Single jogging stroller by Baby Trend. It worked fairly well for our purposes, but it wasn't terribly durable and wasn't really made for speed. We passed it on before our ...


1

My answer would have to be, "It depends". We have an umbrella stroller for traveling and for use in the house when our baby was very young (before he could crawl around on his own). We got both an inexpensive Chicco one as well as a somewhat more expensive MacLaren. They both worked pretty well, except that we actually travel with the MacLaren because ...



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