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15

It seems you're having difficulty expressing the idea of "not sharing" in positive terms. If you call it "taking turns" it's a lot easier to encourage in a positive way. "It's his turn to play with the legos now. It's your turn to play with these velcro stars if you want." Kids that age really glom onto the concept, because it reconciles the need to ...


9

I have three kids. The way we handle this is that if it is in your room, it's off limits and the others have to ask before they can come in your room and play with it. If it is in a common area, then it is fair game and it's strictly first come first server. We also have a "new toy" rule. The first two days you have a toy, you get first priority of ...


7

Alone time is tough, perhaps sharing specific time for each one with another parent so both get a chance to do a task/craft with each child. My wife and I take time with the older one, I will watch the younger and she and he will do something they like to do together. I sometimes will take the older out for baseball or do some work outside and my wife will ...


7

We had our daughter in our room until she was 6 months, our son until he as 9 months. The benefits we found were: Night time feeds are a lot easier - it is a lot easier to get the baby when they are a few feet away. You only have to heat one room. If the missus needs help for some reason, you are already there. You can hear you child breathing, thus tend ...


6

This is a good question. We have a 5yo, 3yo, and 20 month old twins who often have toy ownership confrontations. Dealing with ownership issues is a constant task for us. Generally, in our house it is a free-for-all, meaning that anybody can play with any toy, even if it was a gift given to one child specifically. Our reason for this choice is that with four ...


5

In combination with the concept of "taking turns" you can also talk to your little one about "projects." What I mean by that is best illustrated by giving you an example from home first, and they I'll explain how it applies out in the world. The home example is also a way to "practice" the idea. First, he'll need to know to offer help rather than just ...


5

I think it's a valid concern, but not very serious at this stage. One thing it's difficult to tell from the question is if your son's focused on Elmo when he's moving him out the way, or if he's focused on the instrument. If the latter, then over-excited grabbing at things is pretty normal and harmless for what is basically a bundle of instincts wrapped in ...


5

He can't share nicely with Elmo as Elmo won't take turns or offer an instrument when he is done with it. Instead, explain to your son every time he does it that Elmo is a toy and might break if you treat him this way. It is not about teaching sharing it is about teaching him to take care of his toys.


5

Developmentally they're at the age where sharing is an alien thing, so what you're seeing isn't necessarily a bellweather for problems down the road. That being said, the best luck we've had teaching our 21-month-old to share is modelling the desired behavior. When he picks up something that's interesting to him but that we'd rather he didn't play with ...


4

I have twins who are 2.5 years old. At 18 months consider having the kids take turns with a toy and not play with it at the same time (another form of sharing). First it's Sam's turn and then it's Alex's. You can use a timer so after 2 minutes they have to switch toys. Be very encouraging, thanking them for sharing and playing nicely together. At this ...


2

In my opinion this is very common behavior. He probably wants to both be part of what B does, and maybe to retaliate. Our 3 year old does this quite common to his little brother, 13 months old. He still love his little brother, I and I bet A loves B a lot still. Does A share well with kids his own age? At 4, he is probably used to having some 'discussion' ...


2

First of all, I love the fact that I get to tell one of the forum mods "YOR DOIN IT RONG!!!11" IMO wait till the move. If it's planned and it's in the pretty near future (couple months), there's no reason not to wait. Every routine you have is going to be restarted anyway, and you'll even have to start some new ones. Regardless of how you try to plan it, ...


2

Crafts can often be done on two levels: one kid working on a different project than the other kid. That way, both children can have a reasonably challenging project. This can also help when the older kid wants to play with an 'older' toy: have one kid work on a project which challenges him, which the other would find boring; that way they will both be ...


2

My little one is only 1 year old and so doesn't do structured activities well, but when this situation arises I try to find a similar substitute for him so that his older sister can do her thing. For example, if she is painting he might be colouring with crayons.


2

We were perhaps a bit too conservative in our approach - we encouraged our lot from the start to come and ask us if they could go and play with another child, which gave us the opportunity to say, "No - that boy is busy," or, "You're a bit too big to play with her." On reflection, this probably made our kids, well, at least our eldest, a bit reticent to go ...


1

A lot of parenting at this age comes from just making your best call and teaching the child the "way it is" for them. If you look around the world, kids just learn to adapt to whatever, from the richest mansion to the poorest village -- what they are given is what is normal. It is your job to choose what is best for them. I wouldn't worry about it. ...


1

Given the new information you've offered, it takes a while for the oldest to fully grasp how fragile baby really is, as well as the ramifications of new baby, accept those and grow into being the trusted and helpful older sibling (in my case, I went back and forth between my "evil side" and my "good side" right up until I left for college). All joking ...


1

I agree with Valkyrie. To add a technique, tho, you could also try sitting and playing with one or the both of them a few times. Emphasize when you're giving stuff to them. Emphasize when you don't want them taking the knives that you're playing with at that particular moment, especially when there's other knives on the floor between you just itching to be ...


1

Why should he have to share with Elmo anyway? In his little play world, your son is president, king and dictator for life. Bossing his toys about provides a useful outlet. --- EDIT --- In response to this comment and downvote: I don't think this is a constructive answer. Can you expand further to explain why you think this is a useful learning premise? An ...


1

On your specific questions, what I've found works for my 3 1/2 and 1 yr old. Take the "older" activity to an unreachable place (the kitchen table the smallest one can't reach) so that the activity is "safe" and you don't frustrate the older one by having to do everything over again Have the older one teach things to the smallest one, or give her/him things ...



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