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38

These things you list are a part of our lives, either because we use/do them or other people we know or see use/do. Discovering things through friends is rarely a good idea. That's how myths are spread, "you can't get pregnant the first time", "masturbation will make you impotent", ... "drugs are good". You should give your children the important ...


19

Who do you think will be more likely to provide answers in a way that you would want your children to learn about drugs and sex, you as the children's parents or their peers (whose parent's might also evade the subject)? I don't know about you, but I trust my judgment on and knowledge about these subjects more than those of other children. Of course, given ...


18

Teaching them the correct name is very simple, it doesn't require having to make up names, or work out what to translate as, and as they grow up they won't face any embarrassment in class from using a 'baby' name for something others know the 'grown-up' name for. And I'd certainly be more embarrassed for them to use a play word than the correct terminology. ...


17

While each child is unique, there are some commonly observed sexual behaviors typical for a 5 year old child (so called Normative Behavior) and some behavior that is of a concern (Symptomatic Behavior). The following wikipedia article describes some of these behaviors: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_sexuality#Normative_and_non-normative_behaviors The ...


11

Call the police. Call child protective social services. Edit: Some people may be confused about how the chold is getting access to these men. A ten year old child is not within eyesight all day. The parents may be as protective as they can be but they are no there all the time. Grooming creates a psychologically very strong bond between the abuser and ...


9

Most of the other advice in this topic is excellent but a small item to add: This shouldn't need to be said but there seem to be a lot of parents in this world who prefer to try to control their children through lies. If you lie about sex, drugs and alcohol once they catch you in one lie they won't trust your other advice on the matter.


8

Sex is part of life. Hiding it away until any specific age is unlikely to lead where you want to go. Better to make it part of life. Our kids were raised on David Attenborough's TV shows, so animal reproduction was always part of their background knowledge. My wife is an R.N., so she discussed human reproduction in age-appropriate ways whenever the subject ...


6

This varies dramatically from kid to kid. Some discover it as toddlers and never forget, others not until well into their teens. Because the libido spikes around puberty, this is the most common time to start regular masturbation (usually as a tween), especially for boys. A lot of young women don't start masturbating regularly until a bit later due to a ...


5

Sitting children down to "tell them the facts of life" or educate them about drugs etc is a stressful proposition for parents and children alike; it often feels confrontational and uncomfortable for all involved. A proactive education is very important in some areas and a reactive approach (responding to their questions) is better in others but which occurs ...


5

It's not uncommon for children to find out that there is a pleasurable feeling down there. After all, it's not like it's switched on once they are 18 - although many parents would wish that to avoid awkward conversations. I think the first post goes past the innocence pretty fast and focusses on problems. I'd not scold him for having feelings. But the ...


4

I started "pullin it" just to see what it would feel like at 11. At about 12 and a half, I started doing it until ejaculation, and doing it a lot. Don't talk to him about it. I'm 13 and thank god my parents haven't found out/talked to me about it. Just let him google stuff when he has a problem. It's worked for me. Source I'm 13 years old


3

While children are very young I like using simple expressions like "bottom", "privates", and "chest". However once children are old enough to start noticing specific parts I would move on to correct names. I feel this way because using correct names too young can be confusing and refusing to use correct names at all can have negative effects you would ...


3

Dreaded? By whom? Ok, to be totally honest, the first time, I was sitting in a bar, chatting and drinking coffee, and I was totally unprepared for the out-of-the-blue 'where do babies come from?' But the question comes back, every now and then. Usually it is enough to give true and honest answers, at a level the child can understand. I answer the ...


3

I winced before clicking and was extremely relieved to learn that the problem is sartorial, not sexual. You need to let your son know that it's none of his darn business what clothes his sister wears. Call him on his hypocrisy and emphasize that he doesn't get to control his sister. Different households have different standards of modesty. If your son was ...


2

This is a procedure we apply (works also for activities other than sex): Make sure toddler is asleep Turn on your wireless baby monitor Do whatever you need in any room (except bedroom), break and check when you hear some noise from monitor.


2

Ask the child to excuse your for a minute. Then, dress up quickly and attend to the child's needs, if any. If he/she brings up the topic, then you might have to discuss about sex. If he did not see much, you could probably pass it off as cuddling. If he saw too much, then you will have to explain everything to him, obviously in a way that he can understand. ...


2

I'm not a parent, rather a child, and as someone who's relatively recently (I'm nineteen, so not that recently, but still) been on the other side of this everlasting dilemma, I'm inclined to err on the side of keeping the conversation natural, but firm. In other words, I consider myself fortunate that I was never sat down and talked to about the "birds and ...


2

I'd say start with the real names unless it makes you too uncomfortable to discuss issues like hygiene using the proper names. Being open to discussions is more important.


1

I believe it is important to speak to kids on their level without dumbing down the vocabulary. If they need to know what something is called, then they should be told what that thing is. Whether it's a body part, an injury, an illness, or a bodily function. I think it's equally important to teach them the proper words. Males do not have pee-pees. They ...


1

Just like any other subject, the answer isn't one or the other, but both. If your child is learning to play an instrument, there's a place for normal daily practice and a place for band camp. For sex education, there's definitely a place for ongoing collateral education, but when your child reaches certain points or when it comes up (sex ed at school, ...


1

This other answer by zdenekca has covered most of the things. I would like to add couple of things. I guess it's time to tell your son few things about private body parts. I would definitely tell him that the private body parts should not be exposed or allow to touch anybody other than very close person, like yourself (mom) and that too only when it's ...


1

Many children are aware of sex, but are appaled at the thought of their parents doing 'it'. Perhaps you can use this. Check how your son feels about his parents and 'the dirty deeds'. This might be a question aimed at him together with some friends. If they react apalled, you know you've got them. Warn him: what has been seen, can not be unseen!



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