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11

An adult who has been assaulted should consider calling the police. If for some reason that is not possible they should consider getting in touch with a local domestic violence helpline. A young adult who has been assaulted in a house where there are other younger children who are also at risk of violence should strongly consider calling either the police; ...


8

To me, the most complicated part of this is explaining a) why you don't want to forgive, or trust (or both) your uncle, and b) why you don't trust your mother's judgement on the matter enough to allow her to see your son. (Not that I'm questioning either element - you know the situation - but explaining the above to your child.) Presumably your child has ...


5

On the parent side: Talk to the host parents to make sure you know what the plan is. Will there be a party? Games? Pillow fights? Food? Candy? Bedtime rituals, bath, brushing teeth, prayers? Are there house rules? Get a guest list so you know what other kids will participate (are you okay with who is on the list?). Make sure you agree with the plan. Also, ...


5

This is an old post but ima post for the benefit of anyone else that may need it... First to do is leave immediately. go where? neighbor, quik trip, whatever, but get away from the danger. "but what if they follow" can't worry about that. Stimulus, response. Fight or flight, get out. 2nd thing is call the police asafp. 3rd thing if you can stay put, do ...


5

First of all, do not sneak off. I simply cannot stress this enough. I may sound 'sky is falling' but it's absolutely true that doing so regularly could lead to abandonment issues. You have to say bye, and he has to know it's coming and he has to get used to it. I think the sitter should start with routine. Soon as you're out the door, it's time to start the ...


5

Short answer: tell the the truth Long answer: My father went to jail... twice for the same offence, one time for a short period, 6 months in which my mom told us nothing, and one time for 2 years, and my mother spoke openly about it towards me and my older sister, we also visited regularly and my dad always had writings to give to us or nice drawings. ...


4

I would suggest to tell him in advance, and then just remind him the day before the other kid is actually leaving. In my experience, drawing something nice for the other kid, or drawing a cartoon on where he's going helps. I did some cartooning when we were moving, and my kids loved it. They wanted to see the adventure, and sometimes, they wanted to see the ...


4

Part of your job as a parent is to introduce realistic expectations for your child when the world does certain things. Mommy, Daddy or both will probably need to be inaccessible for protracted amounts of time in order to work, even if one or both don't leave the house to do so. I kind of think 'vanishing' dodges that, at any age .. but we all lose idealism ...


4

I would provide much less information to your children than you have listed here. It would go something like this. Uncle Joe has a problem in his head and he hurts people on purpose. Not just people, but children like you. I won't allow him near you in case he decides to hurt you. (Optionally: it's a very small chance, but even a small chance is too ...


4

I agree with Henry, you need to make sure that someone is there that is compassionate towards the child to ensure he is comforted when mom isn't around. One thing that I did for my little guy was let him carry around a picture of him and mom together. When he would start crying I would let him know that mom had to go to work and would be home before he ...


4

Some people believe in attachment theory quite strongly, and would apply it to this type of case. If your child has an insecure attachment, the best approach is to try and secure that attachment. Make sure that you are not expecting your child to grow up too quickly. When mum has to go, she has to go, just step in there and try and comfort your little one ...


3

What a horrible dilemma! As I see it, your problem comprises three distinct elements: Your mother has little or no sense of what reasonable boundaries consist of. She also lies when it suits her purposes, and for some reason has prioritized her relationship with her son over the safety of her grandchildren Your uncle has even less sense of boundaries than ...


3

Have your friend move out! As soon as possible. But that is only the first step, and you have to make sure it works - so prepare before acting: It sounds like that situation is in fact life-threatening, and that calls for serious action. The first step would be to get out harm's way immediately, and that in itself isn't as easy as just getting up and ...


3

The clear answer is illness. Even a 9 yr old understands sickness. This sickness is one that can cause harm to others because ability for self-control is damaged. Until the illness can be cured, it's simply too dangerous for the person to be around. The idea of illness in others can be very important in these circumstances. It's especially important as ...


3

First, it depends on the child's age and maturity. I think the parent can preper the child for what is about to happen by narrating the near future in a way the child can understand. for instance: "mommy will play with you now, and then mommy will give you a big hug and three kisses and will go. you will stay with daddy, and when it is dark outside mommy ...


2

You should definitely tell your son before the last day. Probably the morning on the first day you know they will meet, in good time before you leave home. Talk to him about it, and encourage him to talk to his friend about it. It is surprising how well kids are able to handle such things in their own way, if they just have some time to process it. The 3 ...


1

Well, I have no easy answer for you. Just remember that crying is only a child expressing his opinion. It's up to YOU to decide if that opinion is correct or not and whether it deserves attention. Of course, responding to crying is BUILT INTO us biologically and can't be ignored. But your logical brain should always trump biology. Your job as a parent is ...


1

Separation anxiety in children is a function of our culture. In other societies where the child is raised within a large group, and care is often passed on from one family member to another, the child rarely reacts to the absence of a parent. It's a fairly easy Google search to find many anthropological studies that reflect this. The lesson we can draw ...


1

We began preparing our kids for sleepovers by starting with late nights out. They would stay at a friend's house until a specific time and then come home. After a few repetitions, my kids would usually ask to stay over for the night. We found that starting slow and expanding was easier for the kids than being overwhelmed with the thought of an entire night ...



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