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English will come if she's living in the United States. She hears it everywhere, she'll be speaking it with most of the people she interacts with. You couldn't stop that if you tried. If you think knowing a second language would be good for her, how else will it happen for her?


2

Unless your daughter is learning disabled, all children have very good (mind bogglingly fantastic) language acquisitions skills-- in particular they can learn a language by mere exposure, which doesn't work for adults. Adults can be said to have a knack for picking up a 2nd or 3rd language-- usually not, adults study for years and still are incompetent--, ...


1

Well if you want your daughter to accelerate her english and an immersion school would help her learn at her own pace isn't that by definition the incorrect choice? If you want her to catch up in English then I do think a great standard school would work, you could also get her to a speech therapist. I am not sure what a French immersion school is, were ...


1

In the delivery room where I had my babies, there was a sign; "You don't need to rear kids, they just copy everything you do." (Without making a judgement on this) if you are the sort of person to whom possession of status symbols is important, then your kids will be too. Period. If you can say "I don't need a new X because the old X is still working", ...


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It depends on whether it furthers their interests in life. If my parents had not bought me very expensive computers and consoles which I wanted for the sole purpose of playing video games, I'd be a loser right now. All my knowledge and the reason I even have a job is because of what I learned optimising my computer for playing video games and modding my ...


0

Yes if you want your child to be another mindless consumer drone. Lets all buy into the status quo after all it fuels the corporate profits. Seriously people wake up and smell the roses, oh yeah another great corporate created holiday roses on valentines day :) Lets spend 49.99 on a dozen of roses when you can buy the whole bush from the nursery for 5.99 ...


1

My 6yo has SM. First, if she has SM, you should give up any expectation that she might talk in your class. Without the chance for her to practice whispering in front of you, it is not likely she will make that leap. Let her know that you will sometimes ask her a question but that she can find other ways to answer if she is not ready to speak. The less ...


3

Your child is going to learn how to face the world based on how you face the world. For example, did you buy an iPad because everyone else has one or because it was a tool to use? Do you buy a particular shirt because it has a logo on it or because that was an appropriate shirt? Do you buy a particular pair of shoes because they say "Nike" or because ...


10

As a young adult (19) I think it would be good for me to input in this conversation as a child of this generation. I would first like to explain my background. My parents were/are pretty low income (£10,000 a year) so during school i often did not have a lot of what the other kids had. For example my trainers weren't the newest, it took 2 years after the ...


20

Like the others, I disagree that you should buying your child "everything". But I feel there is an important distinction other answers don't bring to the point, although some skirt it. When your children asks for something "everybody has", ask yourself: is it a status symbol, or a tool prerequisite for participating in an activity common among its peers? ...


3

The key is to make independent evaluations of the value to your child. What other parents are buying or giving in on shouldn't be your deciding factor at all. Marketing is driven by peer pressure and the attitude of "keeping up with the Joneses" will teach your children bad financial practices and set them up for an inability to succeed well in life as it ...


9

When I first read this question, the first word that came to my mind was bullying. You're in a kind of "damned if you do, damned if you don't" position here, and you need to choose 1) what's really best for your kids, and 2) what heartache you want to face. First, do you have the means, and live a lifestyle, that allows you to give your child everything ...


18

I think that money is not the most important factor here. I think that the reason the children usually have these costly toys (and I mean toys, since most kids do little more than play on them) like smartphones, laptops, tablets, PSPs, etc. is not because their parents care about them; it's often because they actually neglect them. The device is not ...


31

When confronted with these issues for the first time, we asked ourselves these questions: Can we afford to have everything all our peers have? If not, when and how did we learn to not to let this bring us down? Do we calculate our self-esteem depending on whether we can buy the same things our peers do? Seeing some of the things their peers have, do we ...


4

The purpose of Talented and Gifted programs is to provide extra opportunities to students with high levels of ability, talent, or potential. This is important to keep in mind, because the fact that your son was referred to as an "average student" is irrelevant to whether or not he would benefit from a TAG program. Many gifted children wind up being ...


1

I think you need to do one or more of the following: Get the father involved. I am sure he can spare at least 45 minutes to his child every day. Every person that is around the children is partially responsible for its education (not instruction, different things). Put the child on a daily schedule. Have a set time for everything. Bath, meals, ...


0

Oh come on. If you don't tell him, you will never hear the end of it. What bad could happen? Yes. It is a bad word. Not appropriate for a 6 year old kid. Does it hurt them? No. Chose your battles, or you will have more...that's what I always think with my kids. I have 3 year old triplet girls, and all of them have asked about the f word, blame pre school, I ...


1

I was in the same geometry class with one of my sisters when I was 15 and she was 14. I was in the same band class with my other sister when I was 17 and she was 14. At those ages, it was neither an advantage nor a disadvantage for me. We didn't sit together in class, and if we did, we wouldn't have been allowed to talk in class anyway, the same as any ...


6

Unless there are special considerations that you neglected to mention, this sounds like a bad idea. You're essentially making the younger sibling skip a grade with no good reason. Furthermore, the younger sibling's work will be forevermore implicitly compared against the older sibling's work, no matter how hard you try to avoid making those judgements. The ...



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