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16

Part of this answer depends on how much you teach, and trust, your child to question what he has been taught, and to allow him to arrive at his own conclusions. Leading by example is probably the most important factor in this. Your son likes the stories. Can you let him hear all the stories, i.e. take some time in Protestant, Jewish, and Muslim classes, as ...


11

There is a very simple reason why you should not do your son's homework: The results of homework assignments show the teachers whether what he taught was understood. Think of the following scenario: Teacher teaches subject A. Homework covers subject A. Most homework is returned mainly correct. ->Teacher assumes it to be understood and moves on to ...


11

I think the key question to ask is, Is your son capable of not believing what he's told in his Religion class? If he's capable of disbelieving it, then he's not being brainwashed, and there's no great crisis. You would do well to discuss with him that the facts in religion are less settled than they are in most of the subjects he's learning at that ...


9

DISCLAIMER: I consider myself an agnostic, and have recently been leaning toward the atheist end of the agnostic spectrum, but I think I'm significantly more inclined toward the possibility of God's existence than you are, and I happen to know a decent amount about the Catholic Church and to have a pretty healthy respect for it (though I have never ...


8

I agree with the points in Stephie's answer. The first step is to stop doing his assignment for him, not only is it cheating, he simply isn't learning. The entire purpose of schoolwork is to educate him. However, that does not mean completely disconnect from his homework. Make homework (or makeup work) a priority. He should have a designated time to ...


8

Aliel, this is obviously very painful for you and for your son, but I think you might be over-reacting to the situation. From what you've written above, these are some of the assumptions you seem to be making, which I think may not be justified: That your 5-year-old son's perception that his teacher is victimising him means that the teacher actually is ...


7

Ultimately, this is a decision you and your family need to make. There's no right answer. How you feel is fairly common; the feeling that the churches are 'taking advantage' of children to indoctrinate them is from one point of view a logical one. My family isn't all that different, though I would say my wife and I are closer to being "agnostic" (I use ...


6

Disclaimer: I live in germany, so i had my religious education in german schools, but i'm 47 right now, so my experience is 30-40 years old and might be a bit outdated. However, i don't think that very much has changed since then. Also, i was baptized as a (protestant) christian, had 13 years of religion at school, and consider myself an agnostic now. So, ...


5

It sounds like you might be leaning toward homeschooling. If that's the case, bear in mind that you don't have wait for the end of the year. For our son, we didn't even wait out the week, let alone the semester. We had been pondering homeschooling for a while, but one Wednesday he had a particularly bad day with a substitute teacher, and that Friday was ...


5

You are not going to get an accurate report on the day's activities in the classroom from a five year old. In fact most 13 year olds don't report accurately on what's going on. I arranged to spend two full days in my child's classroom. I sat at the back, and had a laptop, and tried to work, although I actually found the noise and chaos made working ...


4

This is the 2010 paper discussed in the CNN article: Côté SM, Petitclerc A, Raynault M, et al. Short- and Long-term Risk of Infections as a Function of Group Child Care Attendance: An 8-Year Population-Based Study. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(12):1132-1137. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.216. Children contract infections around the time they ...


4

I think children go through a phase at that age. I'm 43 and German. My parents are atheists. My father by conviction (1st generation), my mother by tradition (3rd generation atheist). At age 6 I joined the protestant version of the religious education classes at my school, because it was taught by my favourite teacher. I drew lots of camels. Age 11 after ...


4

I think you may find some insights in my answer to a related question, but I also have some advice specifically for your situation. Treat it like school Your son is taking classes, so it's your responsibility as a parent to be involved with his course materials, help him to learn, and help him develop critical thinking and analytical skills. In this ...


3

It's hard to answer without having a lot of detailed knowledge of the classes that really even you probably don't have, but I doubt it would be a net negative to enroll him in a pre-school, as long as it's with some age-equivalent children. You don't say enough detail about that; is it mixed 3.5-5.5 year olds? Or is it all 3 year olds? Even if he is ...


3

I suggest that you provide her with lots of leggings to wear under her short skirts. Leggings are very trendy now, and wearing a short skirt over them gives the look that is "in" right now, but the body is better covered. I've seen this look from some young teens I know, and it allows them to remain stylish, while maintaining a certain level of modesty. I ...


3

I can see that you are very conflicted and I imagine that is difficult. Normally, I don't respond to threads like this, but considering the subject, I felt compelled to share my experience in this area. Perhaps it will help you! I was raised in a very religious Protestant home. I genuinely believed in God, 7-day creation story, and Adam and Eve. I was ...


3

One thing that struck me when reading your question is whether or not the bad teacher knows that your son has a speech impediment? My younger brother has some minor physical and perception-related handicaps that are not immediately visible, and people often react with anger because he's clumsy and seems to never notice other people around him, crashing into ...


2

There are a few things at work here, that seem to be combined in your question. The first is the concept that your child should be exposed to diseases at a younger age in order to avoid sickness at an older age. Much of your immune system works such that once you are exposed to a particular antigen (such as a protein from a virus or a bacteria), you ...


2

You do have every right to be concerned: if the course was merely education of religion, your child would not be singing songs. If you pull him out to protect him from these perceived dangers, there is no way for you to rationalize to him why except "it's for your own good". You can't explain to your child that passing the offering plate without putting an ...


1

First of, I feel bad for your son going through all this at such a young age. I agree with CreationEdge regarding your first question. "look into the school district's complaint policy. It's time to go over the teacher's head" but you should first make sure(I think you really are) that your teacher actually having mean behaviour towards your son and that ...


1

The decision of whether to allow a child to attend religious services is a complicated one. As a general rule, a large number of people believe "Religion is good, as long as it's my religion. You know, the right one." That attitude can make it difficult to trust the religions. I found a few quotes that feel dissonant to me. Before going into my opinion ...


1

In the end, it is really something you need to discuss with your son. The decision as to what path he goes down will ultimately be his. If not now, then as he grows toward adulthood. It doesn't matter if his choice is the same as yours, or if it is different. It doesn't matter if he chooses agnosticism, atheism, or a faith shared by his friends. He ...


1

If you have trained him well, he will be able to discern truth from error, and you must respect his ability to do so himself. There is no danger in exposing a person to an idea that you believe is false, because if it is in fact false he will determine it is so. The real danger is in withholding from your son information which you believe to be false (in ...


1

Our family is approaching this same decision. I found this quote from user what helpful there is a difference between "encouraging your child to learn about religion if they're interested in it" and allowing a religious institution time alone with your child on a regular basis. I suggest teaching your child that: No human is perfect Anyone can make ...



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