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1

You're looking for a "smart baby monitor". However, asking to have a baby monitor that comes with both a proprietary viewing device and and mobile app is probably asking too much from the manufacturers. Developing hardware to view the baby monitors requires the manufacturer to have: More materials costs Increased engineering costs for developing the ...


1

We've used Lorex monitors for years. They can broadcast to Skype. Their hardware tends to be a little fragile, but otherwise works well. This looks like the new model... http://www.amazon.com/Lorex-LW2731-Recording-Monitor-Wireless/dp/B00ARJQRLU We use this older model, which has a dedicated monitor, but no mobile app. ...


0

You could use any ip camera(such as a foscam or drop cam) and simply buy a low cost tablet as the monitor device. Any Android or iPad device would do the trick. Amazon kindle fire for example is very low cost and would work with any ip camera. Or you may already have an old iPod touch or tablet that you don't use or could be used for this that would cost ...


3

A couple of things here stand out to me. First, in general, crib time outs aren't a good idea. They are convenient, but they also create negative associations with the place of sleep, which causes problems later on; around this time children often go through a phase where they don't like to go to bed (as they're starting to be aware of the ability not to!) ...


1

I have been doing some reading up on tantrums recently as my LO is a similar age and started to have them too. I found this link quite helpful - http://www.babycenter.com/0_tantrums_11569.bc as it helps you to see things from their point of view as well. Regarding timeouts it suggests to make the timeout last for about one minute per year of his ...


13

I personally think 21 months is time for a bed he can get in and out of himself - my parenting style leans towards independent kids. That doesn't help with the tantrums though. I have 2 suggestions you can consider: Ask him to go sit somewhere specific, where you can sit next to him. We used a stair, and if he didn't stay put we would go sit with him. ...


5

You might have to abandon the crib/Pack&Play as a time-out spot for now, and pick a corner of the house or a room with, perhaps, a few cushions or other soft things he can sit on/amongst. There he can have his meltdown safely until he cools off. Of course the downside of this is that someone needs to stand guard over him and make sure he doesn't leave ...


2

I don't believe there are any existing products for that specific strap. However, I do have a DIY solution that can be just as easy, depending on your car seat model. This solution would work for my son's car seat and his booster seat both, but I can't tell from the picture you posted if it would work for your model. If you search for "strap slides" or ...


5

This is a problem we faced for a time with my now three year old; not exactly the same (we had a problem with him getting out of the harness/unbuckling it rather than loosening it), but works out to the same thing. By two and a half or so he was capable of both unbuckling himself and buckling himself. (This is with a new-when-he-was-1 Evenflo carseat ...


5

According to the CPSC, you should not resell it and should disassemble it prior to discarding it. Is it okay for me as a consumer to resell, donate or give away a crib that does not meet the new crib standards? A consumer should not resell, donate or give away a crib that does not meet the new crib standards, such as trying to resell ...


0

Ultimately if you teach her to stay away from boys then that will probably end up with her either hating them or completely rebelling against you. I think what you want to achieve is better done by giving her the linguistic tools to say what needs to be said and to whom it needs to be said. If she doesn't like the way someone touches her, her body is ...


8

I suppose you refer to the situation India, which has even hit inernational press lately? (No bashing intended, I commend your awareness and foresight!) Please consider what you want to achieve: You want her to realize that there are some bad men that can do horrible things. That means, not all men are bad and a general "stay away from boys" would be too ...


15

That's absolutely fine - in fact it helps him to develop. How can I help my child to stand? Your child can be held supported in a standing position from an early age This allows the child to experience the feeling of their body weight through their feet. They may bounce up and down. They do this to develop the strength in their ...


4

As someone else has said above, if it was painful for him to do this he would stop. I believe any movement they are making is only helping to strengthen their muscles so that there is less risk of joint problems when they are older. Stronger muscles will help to support joints. My daughter loved to bounce when she was younger (less than 1 year old), she ...


8

No, there is no health risk. Your grandson is actually doing something healthy — building his leg muscles to be able to stand more easily, and to raise and lower himself in a more controlled, coordinated way. Sounds like he'll be walking in the next few months!


7

There are seats you can get for babies to bounce in, which my daughter loved, but her orthopedic doctor said not to use for risk of hip problems. However, that was an external device for a child who already had a high enough risk of hip problems that she had an orthopedic doctor. My guess is the person who told you had heard similar advice, perhaps ...


21

I can't think of any risk in this normal behavior (yes, this qualifies as normal) in a normal baby (contrast this to children who engage in abnormal activity, e.g. head-banging, who are putting themselves at risk). If anything, your grandson is showing good strength in his legs, good balance (he's not falling over with movement), and good large-motor ...


0

Those people saying that kids internet usage should not be filtered are in for a life of pain, especially when their children develop mental problems, depression and addiction. Being liberal with your children and talking to them is not the same as opening the door and letting them into a porn shop and allowing them to browse the material whilst at the same ...


9

I would suggest a Mother's Helper (also called a Kitchen Helper). This allows your toddler to hang out in the kitchen with you - and even help out with simple tasks, which in my opinion is a great start to being a helper with kitchen tasks like doing the dishes or cooking. The toddler stands inside of it, and is able to reach the counter (put it where ...


1

You don't need a door to the kitchen in order to divide it off - you can get little baby-fences that are kind of like baby-gates but wider. Example: That's a 'BabyDan Configure Gate' but there's a bunch of different brands. With most of them you can buy extra modules to go on each end, to make it as long as you like. Of course you can make the gap ...


3

My kitchen also has an "open" plan, so a baby gate wasn't an option. If a playpen or other enclosure isn't possible, or if your son is too distraught at being "abandoned," consider putting him on your back. A back-carrying position keeps a toddler satisfied at being attended to, but away from any dangerous kitchen activities. This can be achieved with a ...


6

If you can't separate the area there's little you can do. Toddlers do follow parents whenever they can, for us it happens even if one parent is engaged in play with the child and the other does something - our LO will "switch" and go from one parent to another with no apparent reason. You can try to ignore the child disturbing your work in kitchen whenever ...



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