Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

30

I think you are reading too much into it. Your three-your-old calmed herself down and contented herself with quiet play instead of napping. She is playing with dolls because that's what many three-year-olds do. And while she wasn't napping, she was having quiet play which is a restful alternative. The ability to entertain oneself is an important life skill!


27

Yes, I think that children's online activities should be monitored but I don't think it's feasible in practice except for very young children. Older kids will always find a way to circumvent your control -- but the good news is that they get more computer-literate in the process :-) To me it's the same as having someone supervise small children at the ...


26

Toddlers happen to be "designed" with the right height and mass that they very rarely injure themselves when falling from their own height. Mostly what you need to worry about is them falling from higher than their own height, like from furniture or stairs, falling onto something sharp, or something heavy falling on them. Most of the falls you are worrying ...


21

Seems unsafe to even try anything like that. I recall our hospital had a whole bunch of things they said not to do with pacifiers that pretty much all revolved around the notion of "don't do like your grandmother did." (if you look at old pacifiers, you'll see they have 4 holes, two on each side... those were for tying ribbon behind the baby's head to keep ...


21

I can't think of any risk in this normal behavior (yes, this qualifies as normal) in a normal baby (contrast this to children who engage in abnormal activity, e.g. head-banging, who are putting themselves at risk). If anything, your grandson is showing good strength in his legs, good balance (he's not falling over with movement), and good large-motor ...


18

No, there is no way to safely do what you describe. Please keep your children in their seatbelts and child seats at all times. I understand what you're trying to achieve, but even if you find a working solution, the risks are immense. Sitting upright with a relaxed head in a collision is safe. So to speak, if the head has already fallen forward before you ...


16

No. I would not risk it. Usually the manual will say not to use the unit if it's damaged, or even to use it if it's older than a few years. Parts may look just little bit damaged, but that little bit can cause a failure during an accident that will leave your little one hurt. Of course, like everything else, there's a tradeoff between cost (in this case ...


16

Taking care of an infant is a full-time job. Are you doing that and working at the same time? That's hard. Kids mimic whatever they see. They want to do whatever it is you're doing, especially if it looks like you're enjoying it. If they see you touching a device a lot (smartphone, laptop, drill press -- whatever gadget or machine it happens to be), they ...


15

For babies and toddlers, setting it on a high shelf should be sufficient. Also, choosing a pistol with a grip safety is a great move -- little hands simply don't have the span to hold it down properly while pulling a trigger (as opposed to "thumb safeties" which are buttons or switches easily manipulated by small hands before firing). Additionally, unlike ...


15

That's absolutely fine - in fact it helps him to develop. How can I help my child to stand? Your child can be held supported in a standing position from an early age This allows the child to experience the feeling of their body weight through their feet. They may bounce up and down. They do this to develop the strength in their ...


13

You can buy corner guards to go on sharp corners. Cables can be routed through cable ducts And there are various ways of securing a television However - and I guess this doesn't really answer the question - what I've ended up doing is not leaving my baby unsupervised near the entertainment system, and giving a firm "NO!" and then moving him away when he ...


13

American Pediatrics Society recommends around the age of 6 before they are allowed to bathe alone; however, a quick google search will tell you that many parents start around the age of 4. However, usually parents who leave their kids alone make sure that they have no music on, and can hear the child clearly wherever they are. They also check in on the child ...


13

Yes, it's uncomfortable. No, it's not a concern. My personal experience (having traveled many thousands of km/miles in the summertime as a child) is that high temperatures while driving is not a serious concern. When you don't have A/C, then your best defense against heat is to be smart: Passengers will be thirsty. Bring lots of drinking water, but avoid ...


13

You or your neighbor should definitely contact an authority. You've described child neglect which is reportable to authorities. To not report it would cause harm and could lead to worse problems. Because there is concern about (abuse or) neglect, a trained professional, such as a doctor or fireman, should be called. One way to deal with this would be to ...


13

While I agree with Torben's answer, the core of this question applies to situations other than just working vs. babysitting. Sometimes a parent may want to check email, do some shopping, or participate in a wonderful online parenting question and answer community. The issue of a baby wanting to play with technology isn't just limited to ...


13

I hear a couple different things here, so I will approach them 1 at a time. First, your girl... News flash: ready? She's 3. 3 year olds don't know much about anything, let alone how to effectively defend themselves to a bully. So that's where parents come in. Most adults don't even know how to effectively handle a bully. She likely can't even remember ...


13

To me, the most complicated part of this is explaining a) why you don't want to forgive, or trust (or both) your uncle, and b) why you don't trust your mother's judgement on the matter enough to allow her to see your son. (Not that I'm questioning either element - you know the situation - but explaining the above to your child.) Presumably your child has ...


13

I personally think 21 months is time for a bed he can get in and out of himself - my parenting style leans towards independent kids. That doesn't help with the tantrums though. I have 2 suggestions you can consider: Ask him to go sit somewhere specific, where you can sit next to him. We used a stair, and if he didn't stay put we would go sit with him. ...


12

You should never secure a pacifier to a child's mouth. Doing so could obstruct a child's breathing, prevent stomach contents from clearing the mouth or airway if refluxed or regurgitated, and decrease oral sensory awareness if the child's senses perceive the device as offensive. It is important that you consider why the pacifier is falling out. Questions ...


12

We had to go by size and strength rather than age. Our oldest is small for her age, so she and her sister started together. I went by "big enough to push the lawn mower and smart enough not to stick their hands underneath." That turned out to be 12 for the oldest and 10 1/2 for the second. Our third started when he was 10, but mainly because he wanted in on ...


11

One day, your child is going to learn how to climb stairs safely, how to go down them safely (on his bottom at first, sitting down on the step and descending, sitting down, one step at a time), how to climb onto the couch and get back off, etc. He's going to fall quite a few times between now and when he will have mastered staying upright on two feet - and ...


11

I think that is a very bad idea, because it is likely to have the opposite effect -- cool rather than scary -- so in effect you'd be teaching your kid pyrotechnics. After all, there's a reason why Hollywood flicks are full of explosions. I'm sure a 5yo doesn't understand whether it's sensible to play with fire indoors. Do you really want him to play with ...


11

In answer to my own question, this is one approach I've thought about, and it would be age dependent, so something like: 0-7 years, no unsupervised access. 8-13, unsupervised access allowed to a white list of sites, everything else blocked. 14-16, no blocking, but everything logged, so I can keep an eye on them. 16+, no blocking, no logging. (Presumably I ...


11

An adult who has been assaulted should consider calling the police. If for some reason that is not possible they should consider getting in touch with a local domestic violence helpline. A young adult who has been assaulted in a house where there are other younger children who are also at risk of violence should strongly consider calling either the police; ...


11

Ultrasonic waves cause some heat and vibration, so prolonged exposure can theoretically have a negative impact. The last article you cite shows 30 minutes of exposure in fetal mice can mildly disrupt their neuronal development. Rat neuronal development occurs much more rapidly than human development. The rat's gestational period is about 23 days, ...


11

The US EPA recommends keeping young children from freshly painted rooms. I would look into paints that off-gas fewer chemicals if I were to paint around a baby or young toddler. You can find several. Here is a list of five and here is a Consumer Reports comparison. Purely anecdotally my mother threw me into a backpack to paint our home when I was a ...


11

We mounted ours to open onto the landing, away from the stairs. We believe this has the following benefits: it's safer when it's not fully closed: if the locking mechanism hasn't really locked, so it is just leaned to, it still won't allow the child to fall down the stairs. it's easier to operate: especially when it's open, you don't have to reach into the ...


11

Let me provide a few separate comments: "Nap time" is often also called "quiet time" because sleep is not mandatory, but the point is being quiet (and calm) for a while. So it's not a problem in my view that she doesn't actually sleep in that time. Many children of that age have outgrown the noon nap anyway. But it's good to still practice a bit of "quiet ...


11

I would agree with your wife as long as there aren't any circumstances/details that you haven't mentioned that would change this situation from two normal children playing together to...something else. First, the key here is supervision. If your wife is willing to supervise, there is no opportunity for the 9 year old to expose your 3 year old to "typical" ...


10

In Australia it is the law that all pools have child safety gates around them. If that's not the case where you are from, I'd strongly suggest investing in one anyway, and being strict about keeping the gate closed. From NSW Commission for Children and Young People Between 1996 to 2005, there were 245 children and young people who died as a result ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible