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1

Perhaps you could negotiate an agreement with your wife, that limits the aspects of her religious indoctrination that you find the most damaging. Perhaps your negotiated solution would involve compromising on a choice of religious institution. (Some couples in your situation are able to meet halfway in a Quaker meeting house, a humanistic Judaism group, or ...


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To me, the Jewish identity is not just about obeying the Torah verbatim. It's mostly about the community and the cultural identity. The community is very tight-knit, of course, which is one of its strengths. It seems clear to me that rote obedience to ancient prescriptions is not what most Jewish people consider fundamental to being Jewish. I went to a ...


0

Watch David Attenborrough's nature shows a family staple. We used to gather on the big bed with a computer and watch them together. There are dozens, many on Netflix. My oldest is now studying conservation biology in college. Just coincidence? Maybe . . . .


3

I just have to suggest it here. I believe that there is a natural progression where most teenage to college age people reject completely rightly the belief of their parents because it is not their own. That's perfectly normal. You have to now find for yourself what do you believe. It may turn up to be the Flying Spaghetti Monster or perhaps another Christian ...


3

I would be concerned that you might be a "believer in Science" just as your wife is a "believer in Christianity," and so I will discuss that potential pattern first. If those words resonate with you, that phrasing may help reframe the situation to help you identify solutions which may be less apparent with other wordings. Science is, at its heart, an ...


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Many children grow to a place where they don't share their parents religious faith but that doesn't mean they don't share any values. However, if you allow your Christian faith to define your entire identity to the point where it's difficult to co-exist with those who think differently, then it's you who has created your own problem. Children are not born ...


3

Regardless of what beliefs you try to instill in your daughter, at some point she will be exposed to multiple points of view and decide for herself. I believe in myself, science and God. Now would be the time to remember Hamlet's lament to Horatio. "There are more things in heaven and Earth, Horatio, Than are dreamt of in your philosophy [science]. But ...


3

I have to think what would I want to do with my daughter. Fortunately for me my wife and I are pretty much inline with each other on the topic. In other topics we are not. In the ones we are not I ask myself. Why not? I certainly hold sway with my daughter just as my wife does. We both bring our unique life experiences into play to mold our daughter as ...


4

It is important to teach your children to think and act logically. If you teach your daughter to question what she is told, read and listen to arguments on all sides of a question, and then come to a conclusion, you will have succeeded as a parent. One important thing to teach are logical fallacies. See this site: http://www.fallacyfiles.org/whatarff.html ...


5

You can control what your daughter practices (i.e., you can declare that she will not be taken to church and not participate in communal worship) while she lives in your house and is in your care. However, you can't control what your daughter believes. As she grows up, she may embrace atheism, or she may be curious about and drawn to religion. What I think ...


1

There is nothing in the field of 'science' that proves God doesn't exist and most scientists who are athiests will say scicene can't prove he does exist either. So you're saying your personal FEELINGS are that you do not believe in God. You're an atheist. The term and/or field of science has nothing to do with your confliction. I ask that you ask ...


18

It seems the conflict is not about your daughter, but about you and your wife. You disagree about religion. That obvious point being said, your daughter should not become the center of a belief battle between you and your wife. To answer simply your main quest : No, you cannot insist your daughter to be non believer in religions., but neither can your wife ...


15

Can I insist them to come in my way or I should keep calm? If you live in a civilized society, then, practically speaking, you can't insist that anyone "come in your way". I would like my daughter to believe in herself and science. It may surprise you to learn that many people believe both in God and in science (I would phrase this as, "If you're ...


3

"For me there has been no serious difficulty in reconciling the principles of true science with the principles of true religion, for both are concerned with the eternal verities of the universe." - Henry Eyring, chemist These words from Dr. Eyring have motivated me in my own life as I simultaneously pursue a Ph.D. in astrophysics while being very active in ...


6

Wonderful question! If you can steer away from the dogma that the written Word is literal truth (with all the contortions you have to go through to reconcile internal inconsistencies), you can focus on the bigger picture. Science and exploration comes naturally to small children. Fill a balloon with helium and watch it float up. Plant seeds or bulbs in the ...


0

It strikes me that discussion of science and religion, while seeking out different kinds of truth, need not get wrapped up in questions of certainty and belief, at least not in the first place. First, both religious faith and science involve radical kinds of doubt: faith without doubt is pretty empty (no 'leap') and science without doubt is just incoherent. ...


0

To answer the part of your question about how should you teach science and help engender a passion for science in your kids, I would suggest that focus on science as experimentation and investigation of the world we live in. What happens when we add this to that, count how long between thunder and lighting. What falls faster, a feather or a leaf. How big ...


11

Science is a tool. Whether it is good or bad depends on who wields it. For all the controversy, things that allegedly conflict between science and religion rarely come up in practice. Personally, I find an evolutionary process to be a rather logical way to effect a creation for someone with infinite time and insight. Even if I didn't, I had to spend all ...


5

Science and religion need not be in conflict. You may be able to teach your children that science and religion both have parts to play in teaching people about life, the world, and the nature of God. There is no need for religion to teach one about the nature of molecules, nor is there need for science to teach about the nature of sin or spiritual ...


18

I personally don't think that science is inimical to faith and faith-based values. It can be a magnificent way to explore the intricacies of creation. You're probably versed in Ancient Near Eastern culture. There is nothing deceitful about a God who communicates with His people in a way they can understand, and in the ANE, that was through stories. ...


39

Rest assured that science and religion are not neccessarily a contradiction. Some of the best scientists of past and present time were deeply religious - and came from different religious backgrounds. As one commenter wrote, Georges LemaƮtre being one relatively modern example. The question of how to connect religious beliefs and teachings and scientific ...



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