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42

Rest assured that science and religion are not neccessarily a contradiction. Some of the best scientists of past and present time were deeply religious - and came from different religious backgrounds. As one commenter wrote, Georges LemaƮtre being one relatively modern example. The question of how to connect religious beliefs and teachings and scientific ...


39

As the other answers suggested, it's very likely that whatever you put will come of as weird. Still, it's an honest and reasonable sentiment, so it's kind of frustrating that it can't be expressed as such. Here's my best effort (to be placed in relatively small print at the bottom of the invitation): Gifts are welcome, but not necessary. If you would like ...


24

I don't think you can really tactfully put it on the invitation. In fact, many would say the invitation shouldn't refer to gifts at all. Registries are quite often communicated by family members and not the invitation - although I find that silly, personally, and certainly would add it to mine. However, what I would typically do is ask your parents or ...


21

I personally don't think it's polite to invite people to a celebration while telling them how they should and shouldn't gift you. While I am not an atheist, I would still be somewhat taken aback by that kind of announcement on an invitation. The gifts at celebrations are certainly appreciated, and baby showers in particular are supposed to be oriented ...


19

I personally don't think that science is inimical to faith and faith-based values. It can be a magnificent way to explore the intricacies of creation. You're probably versed in Ancient Near Eastern culture. There is nothing deceitful about a God who communicates with His people in a way they can understand, and in the ANE, that was through stories. ...


19

It seems the conflict is not about your daughter, but about you and your wife. You disagree about religion. That obvious point being said, your daughter should not become the center of a belief battle between you and your wife. To answer simply your main quest : No, you cannot insist your daughter to be non believer in religions., but neither can your wife ...


16

Part of this answer depends on how much you teach, and trust, your child to question what he has been taught, and to allow him to arrive at his own conclusions. Leading by example is probably the most important factor in this. Your son likes the stories. Can you let him hear all the stories, i.e. take some time in Protestant, Jewish, and Muslim classes, as ...


15

Can I insist them to come in my way or I should keep calm? If you live in a civilized society, then, practically speaking, you can't insist that anyone "come in your way". I would like my daughter to believe in herself and science. It may surprise you to learn that many people believe both in God and in science (I would phrase this as, "If you're ...


13

While you should not lie, you can tell half truths. So rather than telling them about your lack of religious belief, you could instead tell them you were raised Jewish just like them. I would however suggest that you talk to your sister about it, tell her that you don't want to lie but want to respect her wishes, so if they do ask, how does she want you to ...


11

I think the key question to ask is, Is your son capable of not believing what he's told in his Religion class? If he's capable of disbelieving it, then he's not being brainwashed, and there's no great crisis. You would do well to discuss with him that the facts in religion are less settled than they are in most of the subjects he's learning at that ...


11

Science is a tool. Whether it is good or bad depends on who wields it. For all the controversy, things that allegedly conflict between science and religion rarely come up in practice. Personally, I find an evolutionary process to be a rather logical way to effect a creation for someone with infinite time and insight. Even if I didn't, I had to spend all ...


11

Live and let live. While you will obviously want to go along with the show at the bar mitzvah, if the nephews ever ask about your beliefs, I see no reason to lie, even by omission. If your sister's feelings are hurt because you tell your nephews that you do not believe in God, then quite frankly that's your sister's problem, not yours. Also, I'll disagree ...


9

DISCLAIMER: I consider myself an agnostic, and have recently been leaning toward the atheist end of the agnostic spectrum, but I think I'm significantly more inclined toward the possibility of God's existence than you are, and I happen to know a decent amount about the Catholic Church and to have a pretty healthy respect for it (though I have never ...


9

It's possible to not adhere to someone else's beliefs without undermining those beliefs This is a concept that took me some years into my adulthood to really understand. In my youth, I was fervently anti-theistic agnostic. Then I spent time as a very devoted member of an almost fundamentalist sect of Christianity. Now, I've comfortably settled into a ...


8

If you have a registry, I assume that you will simply not include religious items on it. If people mostly buy from the registry, problem solved. I think it would be rude to say you don't want a certain type of gift, whether that is religious or whatever. Like if you said, "Please, no orange shirts, because I hate the color orange", I think that would be ...


8

The title of your post "How can I..." asks a slightly different question from the content, "should we say..." I will answer the latter. In a word, no. You should not mention it. Look at your fundamental motivation. You want to avoid causing your friends and family to waste money. That is an admirable desire, but how your extended family does or doesn't ...


8

Ultimately, this is a decision you and your family need to make. There's no right answer. How you feel is fairly common; the feeling that the churches are 'taking advantage' of children to indoctrinate them is from one point of view a logical one. My family isn't all that different, though I would say my wife and I are closer to being "agnostic" (I use ...


8

I wonder, does your mom have other things to talk about? Clearly she used to. Have things changed? If they have, you can find things to do and talk about together. A book you're both reading, etc. You can't control how your mother speaks, how she thinks, what she believes, etc. You can only control your own actions. But you can talk to her about it, and you ...


7

Wonderful question! If you can steer away from the dogma that the written Word is literal truth (with all the contortions you have to go through to reconcile internal inconsistencies), you can focus on the bigger picture. Science and exploration comes naturally to small children. Fill a balloon with helium and watch it float up. Plant seeds or bulbs in the ...


6

Disclaimer: I live in germany, so i had my religious education in german schools, but i'm 47 right now, so my experience is 30-40 years old and might be a bit outdated. However, i don't think that very much has changed since then. Also, i was baptized as a (protestant) christian, had 13 years of religion at school, and consider myself an agnostic now. So, ...


6

Science and religion need not be in conflict. You may be able to teach your children that science and religion both have parts to play in teaching people about life, the world, and the nature of God. There is no need for religion to teach one about the nature of molecules, nor is there need for science to teach about the nature of sin or spiritual ...


6

At the moment its just a ritual like saying "please" or brushing hair; she is too young to understand the theology. Later you can discuss your beliefs (or lack of them) and the extent to which she should continue respecting her grandparents beliefs. If she notices that you don't follow this ritual then thats probably a good time to start explaining that you ...


5

"No religious gifts thanks!" I don't know what your friends are like, but I think many religious people would not be offended by knowing your preferences.


5

You can control what your daughter practices (i.e., you can declare that she will not be taken to church and not participate in communal worship) while she lives in your house and is in your care. However, you can't control what your daughter believes. As she grows up, she may embrace atheism, or she may be curious about and drawn to religion. What I think ...


4

I think children go through a phase at that age. I'm 43 and German. My parents are atheists. My father by conviction (1st generation), my mother by tradition (3rd generation atheist). At age 6 I joined the protestant version of the religious education classes at my school, because it was taught by my favourite teacher. I drew lots of camels. Age 11 after ...


4

I think you may find some insights in my answer to a related question, but I also have some advice specifically for your situation. Treat it like school Your son is taking classes, so it's your responsibility as a parent to be involved with his course materials, help him to learn, and help him develop critical thinking and analytical skills. In this ...


4

It is likely that at some point, children will naturally become interested in questions like "where did we come from", "why are we here" or even "why do people think there's a magical man in the sky" (It depends on who they hang out with.) Probably the best way to let them pick without imposing, is by telling them "lots of people believe lots of different ...


4

Possibly something along the lines of: Gift are welcome, but not necessary. If you do wish to bring a gift, please consider something from our Baby Shower Registry or a contribution to the baby college fund.


4

There's nothing to suggest that an answer to this question would be different than the answer without the religious context. Since the difference between indoctrination and education is muddled at best, and intentionally divisive at worst, I'm not going to address that terminology beyond this. Your question is really many questions, and these are the ...


4

"For me there has been no serious difficulty in reconciling the principles of true science with the principles of true religion, for both are concerned with the eternal verities of the universe." - Dr. Henry Eyring, chemist These words from Dr. Eyring have motivated me in my own life as I simultaneously pursue a Ph.D. in astrophysics while being very active ...



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