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16

Part of this answer depends on how much you teach, and trust, your child to question what he has been taught, and to allow him to arrive at his own conclusions. Leading by example is probably the most important factor in this. Your son likes the stories. Can you let him hear all the stories, i.e. take some time in Protestant, Jewish, and Muslim classes, as ...


11

I think the key question to ask is, Is your son capable of not believing what he's told in his Religion class? If he's capable of disbelieving it, then he's not being brainwashed, and there's no great crisis. You would do well to discuss with him that the facts in religion are less settled than they are in most of the subjects he's learning at that ...


9

DISCLAIMER: I consider myself an agnostic, and have recently been leaning toward the atheist end of the agnostic spectrum, but I think I'm significantly more inclined toward the possibility of God's existence than you are, and I happen to know a decent amount about the Catholic Church and to have a pretty healthy respect for it (though I have never ...


7

Ultimately, this is a decision you and your family need to make. There's no right answer. How you feel is fairly common; the feeling that the churches are 'taking advantage' of children to indoctrinate them is from one point of view a logical one. My family isn't all that different, though I would say my wife and I are closer to being "agnostic" (I use ...


6

Disclaimer: I live in germany, so i had my religious education in german schools, but i'm 47 right now, so my experience is 30-40 years old and might be a bit outdated. However, i don't think that very much has changed since then. Also, i was baptized as a (protestant) christian, had 13 years of religion at school, and consider myself an agnostic now. So, ...


4

I think children go through a phase at that age. I'm 43 and German. My parents are atheists. My father by conviction (1st generation), my mother by tradition (3rd generation atheist). At age 6 I joined the protestant version of the religious education classes at my school, because it was taught by my favourite teacher. I drew lots of camels. Age 11 after ...


4

I think you may find some insights in my answer to a related question, but I also have some advice specifically for your situation. Treat it like school Your son is taking classes, so it's your responsibility as a parent to be involved with his course materials, help him to learn, and help him develop critical thinking and analytical skills. In this ...


4

There's nothing to suggest that an answer to this question would be different than the answer without the religious context. Since the difference between indoctrination and education is muddled at best, and intentionally divisive at worst, I'm not going to address that terminology beyond this. Your question is really many questions, and these are the ...


3

Find a community of like-minded folks. With most religions, this is your church, synagogue, mosque, temple, etc. It is somewhat harder with atheism or agnosticism. The key is not necessarily practicing the religion, but much more giving your kid a way to feel connected, and know that even if classmates are all Other Religion, there are still plenty of nice ...


3

I can see that you are very conflicted and I imagine that is difficult. Normally, I don't respond to threads like this, but considering the subject, I felt compelled to share my experience in this area. Perhaps it will help you! I was raised in a very religious Protestant home. I genuinely believed in God, 7-day creation story, and Adam and Eve. I was ...


2

You do have every right to be concerned: if the course was merely education of religion, your child would not be singing songs. If you pull him out to protect him from these perceived dangers, there is no way for you to rationalize to him why except "it's for your own good". You can't explain to your child that passing the offering plate without putting an ...


1

In the end, it is really something you need to discuss with your son. The decision as to what path he goes down will ultimately be his. If not now, then as he grows toward adulthood. It doesn't matter if his choice is the same as yours, or if it is different. It doesn't matter if he chooses agnosticism, atheism, or a faith shared by his friends. He ...


1

If you have trained him well, he will be able to discern truth from error, and you must respect his ability to do so himself. There is no danger in exposing a person to an idea that you believe is false, because if it is in fact false he will determine it is so. The real danger is in withholding from your son information which you believe to be false (in ...


1

The decision of whether to allow a child to attend religious services is a complicated one. As a general rule, a large number of people believe "Religion is good, as long as it's my religion. You know, the right one." That attitude can make it difficult to trust the religions. I found a few quotes that feel dissonant to me. Before going into my opinion ...


1

Our family is approaching this same decision. I found this quote from user what helpful there is a difference between "encouraging your child to learn about religion if they're interested in it" and allowing a religious institution time alone with your child on a regular basis. I suggest teaching your child that: No human is perfect Anyone can make ...



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