Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

If his father is in his life, your 10 year old son can't be shielded from his choices. Though there's a cardinal rule about not speaking ill of your ex to your son, that doesn't mean you can't discuss your own views respectfully and honestly, especially when he asks. Speak frankly about what the foundations should be for good relationships whenever he asks ...


0

One reason may be that they are conscious of the fact that too much close contact may (and is likely, at least in popular perception) to lead your significant other to be resentful. "Mama's boy" and all that. As such, they may be consciously letting you set the pace of interactions to what would cause the least amount of strain between you and your gf. ...


1

It's not uncommon for people to develop a stormy relationship with one or the other parent during adolescence, even under the best of circumstances --one might even argue it's part of nature's plan. Personally, I had a good relationship with my parents, and I still elected to go live with my grandparents during the last years of high school. I wouldn't ...


1

I am at the parent end of a similar situation - 23 year old son who lives at home "part time" and with his girlfriend the rest of the time (20 miles up the road, closer to their respective colleges). I decided that being welcoming to him and his girlfriend (both well into adulthood, and in a long term stable relationship) should take priority over my ...


2

With grown siblings, the dynamics of "who calls who" and similar are often very opaque and confusing. They are usually, however, not for a conscious reason but are simply trained behavior on autopilot. I have a similar situation. My parents divorced when my sister and I were in high school. My dad remarried and got three younger stepchildren, and we lived ...


5

I can understand why you feel sad about this but I would suggest that perhaps there could be a more positive reason why you are having this experience rather than that your parents are upset with you or don't want to see you. It sounds like you are very mature and independent, particularly in comparison to your brothers. The situation with your handicapped ...


23

Both my parents and my in-laws had similar issues when I first got married, so I think it's not that uncommon. I would try not to read anything bad into it. It's just a period of adjustment. First of all, consider that people naturally spend most of their leisure time with the people they live with. Think of when you were still living with your parents. ...


10

It's important for a young adult to establish him or herself as an independent individual with his or her own life. Whether consciously or subconsciously, your parents are perhaps trying to help you with that process. Especially now you are to be married, your spouse needs to become the new most important person in your life. In addition, with two ...


3

First, please let me express my sympathy, both for the loss of your brother, and now for the isolation from them that you feel. I don't know what's going on in the minds of your family members. Before you moved out, were they happy in your choice of a girlfriend/fiancee? Were they disappointed when you moved out? Did they help you move? Did they rely on you ...



Top 50 recent answers are included